Mechanical Puzzles
Jim Storer


Copyright (c) James A. Storer 2016.

Table Of Contents

Burrs - 23

Knot Shaped Three Piece Burrs
Wood Knot - 31
Cross Keys (a.k.a. Three Piece Puzzle) - 32
Knotted Cube - 33
Oskar's Blocks - 34
Shaekel Knot - 35
Cheers - 36

Standard Shaped Three Piece Burrs With A Single Trick
Segerblom Knot - 37
Sideways Burr - 38
Sonneveld Three Piece Burr - 39
Triple Play - 40

Standard Shaped Three Piece Burrs
Just The Three - 41
3 Piece Burr Yamaosa - 42
Three Open Windows - 43
GigaBurr & GigaBurr II - 44
Cubie Burr & Cubie Burr #2 - 45

Burrs With Four or Five Pieces
JA6PB - Just Another 6-Piece Burr - 46
Switch Board Burr - 47
Accordion - 48
Octo Burr - 49

Standard Six Piece Burrs
Simple 6-Piece Burr - 50
The Puzzle (a.k.a. Double Cross) - 52
Mikado Block Puzzle - 54
Yamato Block Puzzle - 56
Devil's Knot - 57
Misfit Puzzle - 58
Coffin's Improved Burr - 60
Bill's Baffling Burr - 61
L5 Notchable - 62
Computer's Choice 3-Hole - 63
Computer's Choice 4-Hole - 64
Eight Is Enough - 65
Compter's Choice 5-Hole - 67
The Piston Puzzle - 68
Computer's Choice Unique-10 - 69
L46AA Notchable - 70
Mega Six - 71
Love's Dozen - 72
139 Burr - 73

Non-Standard Six Piece Burrs
Twelve Points To Insanity - 74
Dragon Fly - 75
Butterfly - 76
Explode-A-Burr - 77
Programmer's Nightmare - 78
Holey Astigmatism - 79
U-Nam-It Burr - 80
Bill's Ball Bearing Burr - 81
Blind Burr - 82
Luxemburr - 83
Around The Bend - 84
Frantix - 85
Dovetail Burr - 86
Lock Nut - 87
Missing Notch - 88
Three Pieces Puzzle - 89
Tri Again - 90
Zauberflote - 91
Zig-Zag Knot - 92

Six Piece Plate Burrs
Chen's Six Board Burr - 93
Chocolate Dip Burr - 94
Gordian Knot - 95
Bent Board Burr #2 - 96

Burrs With More Than Six Pieces
Japanese Shape Burrs (a.k.a. Kumiki Puzzles) - 97
Drueke Burrs - Bill's and Marian's Puzzles - 99
Uranus - 100
Miyako Wooden Puzzle - 101
The Aeroplane Block Puzzle - 102
Sydney Harburr Bridge - 103
Bill's Ball Buster - 104
Hectix (a.k.a. Hexsticks, Notched Hexagonal Sticks) - 105
Locked Blocks - 107
Block Puzzle Senior - 108
Satellite Burr - 109
H Burr - 110
Sears Tower - 112
Wausau '81 - 113
Wausau '82 - 114
Wausau 83 - 115
Wausau 84 - 116
Burry Joint - 117
Lassen Risti - 118
Old Oak Of England - 119
Lattice - 120
Quadlock1 - 121
The Pacco Puzzle - 122
Q.E.D. - 123
Miyako 21-Piece - 124
Binary Burr - 125
Visible Burr - 126
SM24 Burr - 130

Multi Burrs
Fusion Burr - 139
Four Burr Stick - 140
Four Burrs - 142
Lost Day (a.k.a Eight Burrs) - 143
Berserk BurrCirc - 144

Framed Burrs
Oskar's Cube - 146
Two Piece Oddity - 147
Pair Dance - 148
Three Sticks Trapped - 149
Three Trapped Sages - 150
Pandora's Box (a.k.a. Internal Combustion) - 151
Spacemine - 154
Locked Sticks - 155
Two Halves Cage - 156
Constrained Burrs - 157

Burr Sets
Simple 6-Piece 6-Solutions Burr Set - 158
Burr Set JCC - 159
CCH Level 1 Key Piece Burr Set - 160
Interlocking Puzzles Burr Set - 162
Interlocking Puzzles Burr Set #2 - 167



Cube Assembly - 170

Pieces Made from Unit Size Cubes
Soma Cube - 171
Half Hour - 172
IP Five Piece Cube - 173
Coffin Quartet - 174
Four X - 175
Bedlam Cube - 176
Century Cube - 177

Pieces Made from Rectilinear Non-Cubic Shapes
Patio Block - 179
Patio Block MPA - 180
Splitting Headache - 182

Pieces Based on Polyhedral Dissections
Quadro Cube - 183
Diagonal Cube - 184

Pieces With Interlocking Connections
Cubes And Pegs - 185
Cubes And Pegs Version B - 186
L-Bert Hall - 187
Five Minute Puzzle - 188
Corner Block - 189
Pieces Of Eight - 190
Groovy Cubes - 192
Twenty Cube - 193
Rik's Kiddy Wrapping - 194

Manipulation of Connected Cubes
Folding Cubes - 195
Hinged Cubes - 196
Kev's Snake Cubes (a.k.a. Serpent Cubes) - 197
Cubra Cubes - 198



Packing (including 2D Shapes) - 199

Checkerboard Puzzles
Checkerboard (a.k.a. All Square Novelty Puzzle, Check-A-Board, ...) - 200
Sectional Checkerboard Puzzle - 201
Chequers (a.k.a. Famous Bug House Puzzle) - 206
The Bug House Puzzle - 208
Famous Baffling Checkerboard Puzzle - 209
XceL Checkerboard Puzzle No. 1 - 210
XceL Checkerboard Puzzle No. 2 - 211
Gyro Checker Board Jig Saw Puzzle - 212
Draught Board Puzzle (a.k.a. Krazee Checkerboard Puzzle, Zebas Puzzle,...) - 213
Adams Idiot's Delight Checkerboard Puzzle - 216
Japanese 19 Piece Checkerboard Puzzle - 217

Richter Tangram and the Other 36 Anchor Stone Puzzles
Anchor Puzzle Tangram (a.k.a Caricature, Cut-Up Square ... Richter No. 8) - 218
The Nine (a.k.a. All Nine, Richter No. 1) - 228
Lightning Conductor (a.k.a. Richter No. 2) - 230
Egg Of Columbus (a.k.a. Columbus' Egg, Columbian Puzzle, Richter No. 3) - 234
Patience Prover (a.k.a. Richter No. 4) - 237
Trouble Killer (a.k.a. Richter No. 5) - 240
Heart Puzzle (a.k.a. Richter No. 6) - 243
Kobold (a.k.a. Richter No. 7) - 249
Circular Puzzle (a.k.a. Richter No. 9) - 250
Cross Puzzle (a.k.a. Richter No. 10) - 253
Not Too Hasty (a.k.a. Richter No. 11) - 257
Pythagoras (a.k.a. Richter No. 12) - 260
Tormentor (a.k.a. Richter No. 13) - 266
BeQuiet (a.k.a. Richter No. 14 /3) - 271
Sphinx (a.k.a. Lott's Stone Puzzle, Richter No. 15 / 16) - 274
Magic Egg (a.k.a. Miracle Egg, Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 16 / 17) - 277
Wrath Breaker (a.k.a. Richter No. 17) - 279
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 23 - 282
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 26 - 283
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 27 - 284
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 28 - 285
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 29 - 286
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 30 - 287
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 35 - 288
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 36 - 289
Richter Summary - 290

Some Other Richter Puzzles and Games
Richter Piccolo Nr. T1 (a.k.a. Richter Picco Nr. T1) - 298
Richter Hamleys - 299
Richter Trench and Zoo Puzzles (a.k.a. Schutzengraben, Zoologischer-Garten) - 300
Richter Star Puzzle - 303
Richter Puzzle Mosaic No. 3 - 306
Richter Meteor 1 - 307
Richter Meteor 6 - 308

Other Tangram-Like Puzzles
The Classic Tangram (a.k.a. Richter Anchor Puzzle) - 309
Daddling - 310
Pythagoras - 311
Voodoo - 312
HiHo - 313
Sherlock Holmes - 314
Scrambled Egg - 316
121 Puzzles - 317
ELZZUP - 318
PIC-TUR-ETT - 323
King Tut's Puzzle - 325
HIQU - 326
Shape By Shape - 327

Other 2D Puzzles With Polygonal Shapes
Four Piece Square (a.k.a. Magic Square) - 328
Double Square (a.k.a Square Me, Five Block Puzzle, Madagascar Madness) - 329
Missing T (a.k.a. T Puzzle, Magic T, Cut-Up T, Pa's T Puzzle, etc.) - 332
What's Your Score - 335
FPuzzle (theF) - 336
H Puzzle - 337
Pie Without E - 338
Make A Square - 339
Major War Problem - 340

Other 2D Packing Puzzles
Checking In - 341
Decoy Puzzle - 342
Batee Baseball - 343
Blockade - 344
Four T Puzzle - 345
Pencil Puzzle - 346
Pearl In The Shell - 347
Czech Farms - 348
Seven - 349

Pentominoes
Pentominoes (a.k.a Polyominoes) - 350
Twin Box Pentominoes - 358

3D Box Filling
Block Head (a.k.a. Sneaky Squares, Stark Raving Cubes, Square Fit, KUBI) - 359
Three Piece Block Head (a.k.a. The Third Degree) - 360
Coffin's 271A - 361
Log Stacker - 362
Dice Packing Box - 363
Chaotic Cube - 364
Pack It In - 367
Cube Root Blocks - 368
Parcel Post - 369
Bermuda Hexagon - 370



Matching - 371

2D Matching
Rubik's Tangle 3x3 (a.k.a Rubik's Mini Tangle) - 372
Rubik's Tangle 3x3 Double Sided - 373
Rubik's Tangle 5x5 - 374
Cluzzelei - 375
Crazy Puzzles - 376
McDonald Land Guzzle - 377
Infants Hospital - The Magic Line - 379
Krazee Links (a.k.a Endless Chain) - 380
Lost Rope - 381
Drive Ya Nuts - 382
Circus Seven (a.k.a. Mind Exerciser) - 383
Circus Puzzler (a.k.a. Color Matcher) - 384
Color Match - 385
Thinkominos - 386
Match The Colors - 387
Triazzle - 388
Bee - 389
Invisible - 390
Snake Pit - 391
Frog Pond - 392
Tool Trouble - 393
Transposer 6 & Bonbons - 394
Transposer Kaboozle - 395
Tantrix Discovery - 396
Tantrix Extreme - 397
Great Gears - 399
Spectra - 400

Instant Insanity Family
Instant Insanity (a.k.a Katzenjammer, Great Tantalizer, Face-4, ...) - 402
The Grand Army Puzzle - 415
The Allies Flag Puzzle (a.k.a. The Allied Flags Puzzle) - 416
The Allies Flags Puzzle - 417
Tantalizing Ten - 418
Cuss - 419
Iribako - 420
Drives You Crazy - 421
Boer War Puzzle - 422

Other 3D Matching
Bolygok - 424
Double Disaster - 425
Mental Blocks - 426
Disney Cubes - 427
Make A Dice (a.k.a. Spots Puzzle) - 428
Twice Dice - 429
Loony Tunes Blocks - 430
Smarts Pyramid - 431
Smarts PyramidJr - 432
The Rock - 433
Einstein Cube - 434
Rubik Triamid - 435



Other 3D Shape Assembly - 436

Convex Polyhedral Shapes
Two Piece Pyramid (a.k.a. Magic Pyramid) - 437
Three Piece Tetrahedron - 438
Four Piece Pyramid, Version 1 - 439
Four Piece Pyramid, Version 2 - 440
Four Piece Tetrahedron - 441
Truncated Tetrahedron - 442
Five Piece Tetrahedron - 443
Truncated Octahedra - 444
Truncated Cubes - 445
Garnet - 446
Y-Knot - 447

More Complex Polyhedral Shapes
Three Piece Block - 448
Three Boxy - 449
Three Bunnies - 450
118-X - 451
Three Pairs - 452
Augmented Four Corners - 453
Turnabout - 454
Triumph - 455
Fusion Confusion - 456
Rosebud - 457
Twelve Piece Separation - 458
Crystal Pyramid - 461

3D Jig Saw Puzzles
Jig Saw Dog - 462
Wonder Puzzle Block - 463
3x3 Chinese Zigzag - 464
3x4 Chinese Zigzag - 465
Four Piece Jig Saw Puzzle - 466
Wonders Of The World Cube Puzzle - 467

Misc. Shape Assembly
Oskar's Matchboxes - 468
Pin-Hole Puzzle (a.k.a Pegged Puzzle) - 469
Wood Star - 470
Saturn Ring - 471
Rubik's Snake - 472
Yin And Yang - 473
Wooden-Do-It (a.k.a. Cigar puzzle) - 474
Gumball Keychains - 476
Hartley's Humpty Dumpty - 477
Almost Impossible Heart - 478



Rubik's Cube Etc. - 479

Rubik's Cube - The Two That Started It All
Rubik's 2x2x2 Pocket Cube - 480
Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube - 491

More Rubik's Type Cubes
Rubik1x2x2 - 503
Rubik 1x2x5 - 504
Rubik 1x2x9 - 505
Rubik 1x2x13 (a.k.a. Unlucky Twist) - 506
Rubik 1x3x3 Floppy Cube - 507
Rubik1x3x3 Floppy Mirror Cube (a.k.a. Magic Floppy Cube) - 508
Rubik1x3x3 Scramble Cube - 509
Rubik 2x2x2 Bandaged - 510
Rubik 2x2x2 Double Bandaged - 511
Rubik 2x2x2 Nested (a.k.a. Rubik 2x2x2 Super Square) - 512
Rubik 2x2x2 Cubes Fused - 513
Rubik 2x2x3 Tower Cube (a.k.a. Slim Tower, Franken Tower) - 514
Rubik 2x2x4 Tower - 515
Rubik 2x2x4 Nested (a.k.a. Rubik 2x2x4 Super Square) - 516
Rubik 2x2x23 (a.k.a. Overlap Cube) - 517
Rubik 2x3x3 Domino - 518
Rubik2x3x3 Layered - 519
Rubik 2x3x4 - 520
Rubik 2x4x4 (a.k.a. WitEden 2x4x4) - 521
Rubik 3x3x3 Mirror Cube (a.k.a. Mirror Block, Yong Jun Cube) - 522
Rubik3x3x3 Fisher Cube (a.k.a. Square King) - 523
Rubik 3x3x3 Void Cube (a.k.a. Holey Cube) - 524
Rubik 3x3x3 Edges Only (a.k.a. Cornerless Void Cub) - 526
Rubik's 3x3x3 Fourth Dimension - 527
Rubik 3x3x3 Layered - 528
Rubik's 3x3x3 Perpetual Calendar - 529
Rubik 3x3x3 Bandaged (a.k.a. Bicube) - 530
Rubik 3x3x3 Patched (a.k.a. Fused Cube) - 531
Rubik 3x3x3 Brick (a.k.a Brick Cube) - 532
Rubik 3x3x3 Latch Cube - 533
Rubik 3x3x3 Constrained (a.k.a. TomZ / Tom's Constrained Cube) - 534
Rubik 3x3x4 - 535
Rubik 3x3x5 - 536
Rubik 3x3x5 X - 537
Rubik 3x3x5 Cross - 538
Rubik 3x3x9 - 539
Rubik 3x3x9RoadBlock - 540
Rubik 3x4x5 - 541
Rubik 4x4x4 Revenge - 542
Rubik 4x4x4 Patched - 543
Rubik 4x4x4 Brick - 544
Rubik 4x4x5 - 545
Rubik 4x4x6 (a.k.a. TomZ 4x4x6 Cuboid) - 546
Rubik 5x5x5 Professor - 547
Rubik 6x6x6 (a.k.a. V-Cube 6x6x6) - 548
Rubik 7x7x7 (a.k.a. V-Cube 7x7x7) - 549
Large Rubik Cubes - 550
Huge Rubik Cubes - 551

Camouflage Cubes / Evil Cuboids
Camouflage Cube 3x3x3 - 552
Camouflage Cube 3x4x4 - 553
Evil Cuboid 2x3x4 - 554
Evil Cuboid 3x3x3 - 555
Evil Cuboid 3x4x5 - 556

Crazy Cubes
Crazy Cube 2x3x3 - 557
Crazy Cube 3x3x3 - 558
Crazy Cube 3x3x7 (a.k.a. WitEden Super Magic Cube) - 559
Crazy Cube 4x4x4 - 560
Crazy Cube 4x4x4 Two - 561

Gear Cubes
Geared 1x1x4 - 562
Geared 2x2x2 - 563
Geared Mixup - 564
Gear Cube - 565
Gear Cube Extreme - 566
Timur Gear Skewb - 567
Gear Shift - 568

Other Rectangular Shapes
Mixup Cube - 569
Ghost Cube - 570
Pocket Cube - 571
Axel Cube - 572
Skewb - 573
Holey Skewb (a.k.a. Void Skewb) - 575
Golden Cube - 576
Dino Cube (a.k.a. Dinosaur Cube) - 577
Blue Magic (a.k.a. Black Flower Cube, Star Cube, Rex Cube) - 578
Mosaic Cube - 579
Square 1 (a.k.a. Super Cubix, Cube 21) - 580
Helicopter Cube - 588
Curvy Copter - 589

Pyrmid and Diamond Like Shapes
Pyraminx - 590
Pyraminx Duo - 594
Pyraminx Diamond - 595
Jing's Pyraminx (a.k.a. Rounded Halpern-Meier Pyramid) - 596
Crazy Pyraminx (a.k.a. Crazy Tetrahedron Plus) - 597
Gear Pyraminx - 598
Gear Pyraminx2 (a.k.a. Gear Mastermorphix) - 599
Tetraminx - 600
Professor Pyraminx - 601
Vulcano - 602
Megaminx (a.k.a. Supernova) - 603
Holey Megaminx - 604
Crazy Megaminx - 605
Gear Minx - 606
Kilominx (a.k.a. Flowerminx) - 607
Master Kilominx - 608
Gigaminx - 609
Teraminx - 610
Gear Change - 611
Pyraminx Crystal - 612
Helicopter Dodecahedron - 613
Skewb Diamond - 614
Super Skewb Diamond (a.k.a. Diamond Octahedron) - 615
Skewb Ultimate - 616
Skewb Kite - 617
Skewb Fourteen - 618
Pyrastar - 619
Pyramorphix (a.k.a Figurenmatch, Distortion Demon Square) - 620
Starburst (a.k.a. Star of David, Sterns Puzzle) - 621
Mastermorphix (a.k.a. Master Pyramorphinx) - 622
Dinomorphix - 623
Pillow Cube (a.k.a. Cushion Cube) - 624
Enhanced Pillow Cube (a.k.a. Polish Cushion) - 625
Confused Pillow Cube - 626
Hungarian Diamond - 627
Rhombi Diamond (a.k.a. Diamond Style Puzzler) - 628
Octahedron (a.k.a. Magic Octahedron) - 630
Full Octahedron - 631
Flowered Jewel (a.k.a Jewel Puzzler, Christopher's Magic Jewel, ...) - 632
Gear Octahedron (a.k.a. Timur Gear Corner Turning Octahedron) - 633

Disc and UFO Shapes
Rubik's Cheese - 634
Rubik UFO - 635
UFO Cheese - 636
Rubik Cheese Cake - 637
Puck Puzzle (a.k.a Hockey Puck Puzzle) - 638
Saturn - 639
Hungarian UFO (a.k.a. Varia Disk) - 640
Tricky Disky (a.k.a. Tricky Disk, Mind Trapper) - 641
Smart Alex (a.k.a Alpa-2-Go) - 642
Netblock UFO / Sando Ring (a.k.a. King Ring) - 643
Octo (a.k.a. Meeting Colors, Disco Puzzle) - 644
Gerdig UFO - 645
Brain Ball - 646

Sphere Shapes
Rubik 2x2x2 K-Ball - 647
Rubik 3x3x3 Ball - 648
Rubik 3x3x3 Apple - 649
Gear Ball - 650
Master Ball (a.k.a. Duo Master, Geo Master) - 651
Skewb Puzzle Ball (a.k.a Creative Puzzle Ball) - 654
Impossiball - 656
Dogic - 657

Other Shapes
Rubik House (a.k.a. Eight Planets Bermuda Cube) - 658
Time Machine - 659
Rubik Barrel - 660
Cuboctahedron - 661
Rainbow Cube - 662
Rainbow Nautilus - 663
Pentahedron - 664
Pentahedron 5 Layer - 665
Crazy Pentahedron - 666
Dino Star - 668
Alexander's Star - 669
Platypus - 670
Skewb Egg (a.k.a. Golden Egg, Silver Egg, etc.) - 671
Brain Twist - 672
Roundy - 673



Other 3D Manipulation - 674

Panel Puzzles
Rubik Mini Magic Panels (a.k.a Rubik Magic Junior) - 675
Rubik's Magic Panels - 680
Rubik Magic Panels Create The Cube - 688
Rubik's Master Magic Panels - 690
Rubik Magic Cross Panels - 692
Rubik Super Magic Panels - 693

Towers Of Moving Balls Or Tiles
Whip-It Towers (a.k.a. Genius Puzzle) - 695
Varikon Towers - 696
Whip-It Ball - 698
Babylon Towers - 699
Calendar Bank - 700
Thai Tower (a.k.a. Clever Toys Tower) - 701
Numbers Barrel - 702
Missing Link - 703
Reduced Missing Link - 705
Extended Missing Link - 706
Doubled Missing Link - 707
Mini Missing Link - 709

Other Puzzles With Moving Balls or Tiles
Magic Rainbow Ball - 710
Hungarian Globe (a.k.a. Equator Ball, Magic Sphere, IQ Ball) - 711
Bolaris - 713
Magic Sphere - 714
Touchdown - 715
Twister (a.k.a. Wooden Screwball, Clever Toys Natural) - 716
Atomic Chaos (a.k.a. Kaos) - 717
Entrapment - 718
Pakovalec (a.k.a. Stupid Cylinder) - 719
Ten Billion Barrel (a.k.a. Billion Barrel, Tumbler Puzzle) - 720
Russian Revolver (a.k.a. Russian Flower, Russian UFO, Soviet UFO) - 721
Back Spin (a.k.a. Loophole) - 722
Sliding Piece Can Puzzle - 723
Sliding Piece Can Puzzle - 724
Brain Racker - 725
The Orb (a.k.a. Orb-It, l'ORBS) - 726
Rubik's Shells - 727
Astrolabacus - 728

Movement of Pieces by Tilting or Pushing
Varikon Box 2x2x2 - 729
Varikon Box 3x3x3 - 730
Inversion - 731
Peter's Black Hole / Vadasz Cage (a.k.a. Inside Out, Magic Jack, IQ Cube) - 733
Mad Marbles - 734
Dice Box - 735
Clark's Cube - 736
Pionir Box (a.k.a. Pionir Cube) - 737
Rubik Dice - 738

Movement of Discs and Rings
Towers Of Hanoi (a.k.a. Pyramid Piling Puzzle, Rainbow Puzzle, Brahma Puzzle) - 739
Chinese Rings (a.k.a. Cardan's Rings, Baguenaudier) - 742
Spinout - 746
Hexadecimal Puzzle - 747
WanderRings - 751
Panex - 753

Manipulation Of Positioned Balls, Levers, Buttons, Etc.
Cmetrick - 754
Cmetrick Too (Hard) - 755
Planets - 756
SaturnLD - 757
Orbik - 760
Rolling Cubes - 761
Cross Teaser - 762
Rubik's Clock - 763
Cerebral Rings Puzzler - 765
Simultaneous Maze - 766

Misc.
Wisdom Ball (a.k.a. Mind Twister) - 767
SpongeBob PuzzlePants (a.k.a. SpongeBob Cube) - 768
Flip Side - 769
Kabalabda - 770
Rubik's Rabbits (a.k.a. Rubik's Hat) - 771
Enigma - 772
Brain Puzzler - 773



Sliding Pieces and Other 2D Manipulation - 774

Square Pieces
Fifteen Puzzle - 775
Unocando - 823
Sixteen Puzzle - 824
Eight Puzzle (a.k.a. Super Solitaire) - 825
Nine Puzzle - 826
Ditho (a.k.a. Fourteen Puzzle) - 829
Great Fifty Puzzle - 832
Panama Canal Puzzle - 833
Moving Day (a.k.a. a.k.a. 5-Block Puzzle, Lodging House Difficulty) - 837
Bull's-Eye (a.k.a. Bullseye, Target, Zot) - 838
Good Luck - 844
Twenty - 845
Double Trouble Puzzle - 846
Twenty Seven - 847
Scrabble Pocket Puzzle - 849
Thirty One (a.k.a. Jumble) - 850
RO-LET - 852
Cornell Crossword Puzzle - 853
SKOR - 854
ScribeO - 855
LINGO - 856
Missionary Puzzle - 860
Mystic - 861

Square Pieces With Obstacles
Grandpa's Car (a.k.a. Slide-Blocked Sliding Block) - 862
Time Puzzle - 863
Work Or Golf (a.k.a. Motor Garage Puzzle, Parka Car, Sputnik, E Peg Puzzle) - 866
Honor And Glory (a.k.a. Black And White) - 869
One Fish Another Fish - 871

1x2 Pieces and (in most cases) 1x1 pieces
Get My Goat (a.k.a. Kapture The Kron Prinz, Boogie Man, Center Point, ...) - 872
Line Up The Quinties - 878
Johnson City Puzzle - 880
Four Suits 2 - 882
Puzzle Contrast - 883
Sliding Arrow Through The Bottle Puzzle - 884
Slidem WWII Puzzles - 885
Monarch - 889
Sliding Chess Mate 36 - 890
Straight Arrow - 891

Dad's Puzzler Family - 4x5 Trays and Multiple Shapes Rectangular Pieces
Dad's Puzzler (a.k.a. Moving Puzzle, Tit-Bits Teaser 1, Pennant Puzzle, ...) - 892
Dads Puzzler - Humdinger Version - 927
Dad's Puzzler - Exchange Version / Infants' Hospital - 934
Quzzle And Quzzle Killer - 941
Nine Block - 945
Red Donkey, with Simple TJ, Century, Super Century (a.k.a. L'Ane Rouge, ...) - 948
Traffic Jam / Let Me Through - 958
Century and Super-Century - 963
Grand Master With Century And A Half and Little House - 969
Ushi And Ushi-Flipped - 973
Hole In One With Royal Out and King Out - 976
Fence The Cow - 979
Dad's Puzzle Family Set With Fujiwara 15/22/25 and Super Compo - 981

Dad's Puzzler Family With Obstacles and Non-Rectangular Pieces
D209 - 986
Super Dries - 987

Beyond Dad's Puzzler Family
Sunbeams Rainbow Puzzle - 988
Infants Hospital Puzzle (a.k.a. Infants Progress Puzzle) - 989
Trans-Atlantic (a.k.a. Ten Block Puzzle, Traffic Cop Tangle) - 991
Happy Couple (with Ten Block and The Hughes Puzzle) - 993
Flying Puzzle (a.k.a. Starry Puzzler, Tit-Bits Teaser No. 2, Ching Foo, ...) - 999
Technocracy - 1009
George Washington Puzzle - 1010
Presidential Puzzle - 1013
Tit Bits Teaser No. 5 - 1015
Century Of Progress (a.k.a. South Pole Expedition) - 1020
Sliding Block Puzzle (a.k.a. Fifteen Block Puzzle, 1-2-3 Puzzle, ...) - 1022
Slide A While & Model Garage - 1027
Tokyo Parking / Rush Hour - 1032
Adam & Eve (a.k.a. Comic Scramble Game) - 1036
RunAway II - 1038
Neo Pink And Blue - 1040

Further Beyond Dad's Puzzler Family - Non-Rectangular Shapes
Ma's Puzzle (a.k.a. Spirit of '76, Wooden Puzzle, Rectangle Puzzle) - 1043
Dad's and Ma's Stumbling Blocks (a.k.a. Dad's Puzzler + Ma's Puzzle) - 1050
Mini Ma - 1051
Traffic Jam Puzzle (a.k.a. Tit-Bits Teaser No. 4) - 1052
Triple Tango - 1059
Clouds And Sheep - 1060
Slider (a.k.a. Hole In One) - 1061
Heart-In - 1062
Soap - 1063
Block Ten - 1064
Stumbling Block - 1070
I Want You - 1072
Neo Black And White - 1074
Kuroko And Dairu - 1079
Dinosaur Egg (a.k.a. Egg Puzzle) - 1080
Solo - 1081
Angel And Satan - 1082
Dog And Cat - 1083
Two Sliding Squares - 1084

Sliding Pieces Non-Standard Movement - layers, capture movement, rotations, etc.
Get My Sheep - 1085
Two Eggs - 1087
Sliding Cross - 1097
Football Match - 1106
Sliding Three - 1109
Neo Slide-9 - 1110
RunAway - 1112
Trap - 1114
Tricky - 1122
Two Dogs - 1130
Stacking Cups - 1133
Train Puzzle - 1140
Dustin Puzzle - 1141
Who's The Boss - 1142
Easy - 1148
Easy 1989 - 1150

Movement of Buttons, Balls, Numbers, etc.
New Fifteen Puzzle - 1152
Perplexity Puzzles (Perplexity, Automobile, This is Jonah, Panama Canal) - 1153
One To Ten - 1154
Good Luck Railroad Puzzle Game - 1155
Rotos - 1156
Puzzler Novice / Challenge / Avenger (a.k.a. Turnstile, Twinspin, ...) - 1157
Rotascope (a.k.a. Taquinoscope) - 1158
Hungarian Rings - 1160
Hungarian Rings Triple - 1161
Hungarian Rings Quad - 1162
Hungarian Olympic Rings - 1163
One Circle Two Circles - 1164
Billiards - 1165
Billiards 9-Ball - 1166
Flower - 1167
Trio - 1168
Trio 2 - 1169
Butterfly - 1170
Subway Shuffle - 1171

Movement of Tokens
Eight Peg Puzzle - 1177
TeeZ / Brain Buster - 1178
Peg Puzzle - 1179
Hopper (a.k.a. Downsize) - 1180

Mechanically Assisted Sliding Pieces
Top Spin / No. Crunch - 1182
Line Art - 1183
Colour Match - 1184
Magic Cross (a.k.a. Zauberkreuz) - 1185
Rubik's XV (a.k.a. Rubik's Fifteen) - 1186
Tsukuda's Square (a.k.a. It, 4x4 Four By Four Puzzle) - 1187
Uriblock (a.k.a. Mix Box) - 1188
Trillion - 1189
Port To Port And Triple Cross - 1191
Switch Back - 1195
SwissMad - 1196
Modern Times - 1197
Mad Triad Challenge (Twisting Tri-Side Puzzle) - 1198
Mad Triad Handy (Twisting Tri-Side Puzzle) - 1199
La Cerradura Doble - 1200
Elemental Neon - 1201
Fluorine - 1203
SF PP STAR 29 - 1204



String and Wire Puzzles - 1205

Move or Remove a Ring
Horse Shoes - 1206
Ball And Ring (a.k.a. Ball And Chain) - 1207
Moving Rings (a.k.a. Moving Beads, Tiger Cross, Wizzard Wedding Ring) - 1208
Wits End - 1209
Single Loop Wit's End - 1211
Loop Trap - 1212
Parallel Dimension - 1213

Disengage Two Pieces
Nails - 1214
Wire U's - 1215
Wire P's - 1216
Wire Heart - 1217
Cast Ring - 1218
Vortex - 1219
Simple Knot 47091 - 1220
EZ Atom 47092 - 1221
Lucky Clover - 1222

Misc.
Rod and Loop - 1223
Hide The Knots - 1224



Other Puzzles - 1225

Mechanicl Challenges
TakitaparT (a.k.a Take It Apart) - 1226
Double Puzzle - 1227
Rook Puzzle - 1228
Bolt And Ball - 1229
Spark Plug Puzzle (a.k.a. Bougie, Get Charged) - 1230
Cage Puzzle - 1231
Drive The USA - 1232
Screwball - 1233
Magic Chalice - 1234

Dexterity Puzzles
Abercrombie & Fitch Dexterity Puzzles - 1235
A Ward In The Infant's Hospital (a.k.a. The Little Patients Puzzle) - 1236
ElsieCow - 1237
Reiss Style 393 - 1238
Crazy Maze - 1239
Metro - 1240
Perplexus - 1241

Brain Teasers
What's Your Age - 1242

Jigsaw Puzzles
Infants Hospital Jigsaw Puzzle - 1243

Puzzle Boxes
Parrot Box - 1244
Spin Box - 1245
Coffin's Double Play X-48 - 1246
Stickman Fulcrum Box - 1247
Pirate's Wallet Box (a.k.a. Stickman No. 27) - 1248
Stickman Grandfather Clock - 1257



Games - 1263
Goblet - 1264
Quixo - 1267
Quarto - 1268
Othello - 1269
Nine Mens Morris (a.k.a. Mill, Muhle, Merelles / Merilles, Mulino) - 1270
Tablut - 1272
Senet - 1274
Nannon (a.k.a. Nano Backgammon) - 1278
Make Numbers - 1279



Books - 1280

Hoffmann Related Books
Hoffmann's Puzzles Old and New (1893) - 1281
Hordern's Edition Of The Hoffmann Book (1993) - 1287
Het Puzzle-Boek (1900) - 1288
Hoffmann Posthumous Books (1925) - 1289
Hoffmann's Best Math Book (2007) - 1290
Hoffmann Patience Games Book (1892) - 1291
Hoffmann's Magic Trilogy Books (1920) - 1292
Hoffmann Study Book (1977) - 1293

Other Books from Before 1960
Robert Merry's Books Of Puzzles 1-3 (1866) - 1294
Excursions Into Puzzledom (1879) - 1296
Everybody's Puzzle Book (1890) - 1297
Richter Company U.S. Brochure (early 1900's) - 1298
New Book Of 200 Puzzles (1908) - 1305
Dudeney Books (1920's) - 1306
Dudeney Posthumous Books - 1307
Sam Loyd's Cyclopedia Of Puzzles (1914) - 1308
Sam Loyd and His Puzzles (1928) - 1309
Wyatt's 1928 and 1946 Books - 1310
Johnson Smith Catalog (reprinted from 1929) - 1311
Hirschberg Book (1930) - 1312
I-X-L Puzzle Book (1938) - 1313
Filipiak Book (1942) - 1314
Everythings A Puzzle (1953) - 1315

Books 1960 - 1999
Bell's History of Board Games (1960) - 1316
Murray's History of Board Games (1978) - 1317
Delft And Botermans Book (1978) - 1318
Winning Ways Books (1982) - 1319
Hordern's Sliding Puzzle Book (1986) - 1320
Slocum and Botermans Books (1986) - 1321
Cutler's 6-Piece Burr Books (1986) - 1322
The Mathematics Of Games (1989) - 1323
Coffin's Book On Polyhedral Dissections (1990) - 1324
Coffin's Puzzle Craft Books (1992) - 1325
The Puzzle Archade (1996) - 1326
Gabarchuk's Sliding Block Puzzle Book (1996) - 1327
Frederickson's Dissections Book (1997) - 1328
G4G Tributes To Martin Gardner (1999) - 1329

Books 2000 - present
The Follette Puzzle Design Book (2001) - 1330
The Tangram Book (2003) - 1331
Haubrich's Checkerboard Puzzles (2005) - 1332
The Fifteen Book (2006) - 1333
A Visual History of The S.S. Adams Co. (2006) - 1334
The Self and Lensch Puzzle Design Book (2006) - 1335
Boardman's Puzzle Projects Book (2007) - 1336
The Cube Book (2009) - 1337
Hess Mathlete Book (2009) - 1338
Diaconis and Graham Book (2012) - 1339
Stickman Book (2012) - 1340
The Anchor Puzzle Book (2012) - 1342
Coffin's AP-ART Book - 1344

--- 23 ---
Burrs

Pieces are formed by removing unit cubes from rectilinear solid pieces. A burr is notchable if it can be made with just straight cuts. Some burrs have a "key" piece that slides out. More complex ones have a number of internal voids (called holes), where removing the first piece may require sliding several pieces. An assembly of a burr is a solved shape. An assembly is a solution if it can be achieved by starting with the pieces apart and making legal moves. The level of a solution is the minimum number of moves required to remove the first piece (or separate the puzzle into two parts). The level of a burr is the lowest level of its solutions. Note that to compute level, we use Cutler's definition, where the movement of several pieces together, or the consecutive movement of pieces in the same direction, counts as a single "move". Burr level can be expressed with more than one number; e.g., 3.7.2 means 3 moves to remove the first piece, 7 moves to remove the second piece, and 2 moves to remove the third piece.

--- 24 ---
Standard Six Piece Burrs


The most well known burr is the standard 6 piece burr, with 2 x 2 x 6 unit pieces (or sometimes 2 x 2 x 8). For example, the figure above shows Coffin's Improved Burr, which requires 3 moves to remove the first piece (letters show how pieces fit, numbers indicate an order in which they can be disassembled).

The number of holes in a standard 6-piece burr: Standard 6-piece burr records, from the computer work of Bill Cutler:

--- 25 ---
Interesting Issues For Burrs
Questions and generalizations for 6-piece burrs: Other Types of Burrs:
Non-standard 6-piece burrs have six pieces but don't adhere to standard construction rules. Burrs in the theme of the standard 6-piece burrs but with more pieces can be very hard, and more pieces combined with non-standard types of constructions can derail approaches that you have worked out for standard constructions. Finally, burrs with fewer than six pieces can be quite fun. The most well known are 3 piece "knots" that fit together in a simple but not at first apparent way. Some three piece knot variations require unusual twists or diagonal motions as well. Burrs in the theme of the standard 6-piece burrs with as few as 3 pieces can be quite difficult (e.g., the Cuter Level 8 GigaBurr).

--- 26 ---
Burr History
The basic idea of a burr seems quite old. The 1893 Hoffman book presents a wood knot as "Cross Keys" and a 6-piece burr as "The Nut". The 1929 Johnson and Smith Catalog, on pages 254-255, shows a 6-piece burr, a two burr stick, and related wood puzzles. The Puzzlers' Tribute book, on page 260 cites a 6-piece burr called the Devil's Hoof and a 24-piece burr called the Large Devil's Hoof in a Catel's catalogue of 1785, and credits David Singmaster as having found an example of a 6-piece burr in a 1733 Spanish book by Pablo Minguet E. Irol; also, on page 262 it credits the Mikado Puzzle as shown in the 1915 C. J. Felsman Catalogue.



The Slocum and Botermans New Book of Puzzles on page 52 discusses the Spears Puzzle knots manufactured in Bavaria in 1910 and marketed in England; it is also mentioned that six piece burrs appeared in Bestelmeier's 1803 Toy Catalog.

--- 27 ---
Classic Burrs
The 1942 Filipiak book has a substantial discussion of burr puzzles; here are figures it shows of a 3-piece wooden knot, a 6-piece burr, and a 6-piece burr set:



--- 28 ---
Burr Patents
There have been many burr patents; for example, here are the figures from the 1890 Altekruse and 1917 Brown patents:




--- 29 ---
Some Burr Patents
Chandler Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 393,816
Altekruse Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 430,502
Porter Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 524,212
Nelson Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 588,705
Ford Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 779,121
Curtis Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 781,050
Erickson Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 985,253
Banic Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,099,159
Brown Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,225,760
Keiser Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,261,242
Senyk Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,350,039
Schenk Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,455,009
Kramariuk Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,542,148
Turner Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 2,836,421
Pidgeon Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,148,489
Derouin Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,880,238
Dykstra Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 5,040,797

--- 30 ---
Further Reading
Rob's Puzzle Page, from: http://home.comcast.net/~stegmann/interlocking.htm
Cutler's Holey 6PB Booklet, from: http://home.comcast.net/~billcutler/docs/H6PB/index.html
Cutler's Computer Analysis, from: http://home.comcast.net/~billcutler/docs/CA6PB/index.html
IBM Burr Page, from: http://www.research.ibm.com/BurrPuzzles
Curfs' Page, from: http://home.tiscali.nl/~bcurfs/homepage/burrs/burrs-e.htm
Math Games Page, from: http://www.maa.org/editorial/mathgames/mathgames_08_02_04.html
Wikipedia Burr Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burr_puzzle
Mathematische Basteleien Page, from: http://www.mathematische-basteleien.de/devilsknot.htm
Mr. Puzzle Page, from: http://www.mrpuzzle.com.au/category129_1.htm
Source Forge Page, from: http://burrtools.sourceforge.net/gui-doc/BurrDesignTools.html

--- 31 ---
Wood Knot

Interlocking Puzzles,
circa 2000.

(3 wood pieces, 2.75")

Daniel C. Alsmeyer 2006,
Sabriday Puzzles.

(3 wood pieces, 3")

"Triple Cross",
Puzzles & BT 2006.

(3 wood pieces, 3.2")

Three examples of the wood knot that was patented by M. P. Rao in 1980. Here are the directions that were sold with the Sabriday version:



Further reading:
Rao Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,198,053

--- 32 ---
Cross Keys

a.k.a. Three Piece Puzzle
Purchesed from Puzzles and Brain teasers Ebay Store 2006.
(three wood pieces, 3.75 inches;
described on pages 106 and 139 of the 1983 Hoffmann book)

--- 33 ---
Knotted Cube

Designed and made by Interlocking Puzzles, circa 2000.
(walnut, paduk, and hard maple, 3 inches square)

Unlike the common three piece wood knot, there are no identical pieces:


--- 34 ---
Oskar's Blocks

Designed by Oskar Van Deventer, purchased from Bits And Pieces, 2008.
(metal, 1.4 inches)

Here are photographs of the three pieces being disassembled:


Here is the solution sheet that was sold with the puzzle:

--- 35 ---
Shaekel Knot


Designed by Oskar van Deventer 1983.
Made by Tom Lensch.
Sold by Cubic Dissection 2005.
(three wood pieces and solution figures, 3 inches)

--- 36 ---
Cheers

Designed by Ronald Kint-Bruynseels, made by Eric Fuller 2006, Level 8.
(wood, 3 inches)

Here are the 8 assembly steps:




--- 37 ---
Segerblom Knot

Designed by Wilhelm Segerblom in the late 1800's.
(three wood pieces, 2.25 inches)

The IBM Burr page cites the April 1899 issue of Scientific American as publishing this puzzle. Three identical pieces each have outer dimensions 2 by 2 by 6 units. Each has all of the center 2 by 2 by 2 portion removed except for a 1 by 1 by 2 rod that is beveled at 45 degrees (a total of 7 units of wood has been removed from each piece). To assemble, all three pieces have to be slid together simultaneously (an outside surface of the rod slides perpendicular to one piece while the beveled surface slides over the corner of another). It is not possible to put two pieces together and then slide the third one in. The figure below shows the three identical pieces in the orientation to be put together.



Further reading:
IBM Burr Page, from: http://www.research.ibm.com/BurrPuzzles/

--- 38 ---
Sideways Burr

Designed by R. Stanton, made by E. Fuller 2008.
(Curly Maple, 3 inches)

Three identical piece slide together simultaneously to make a 3-dimensional cross.

Assembly: Hold one piece vertically and determine how a second piece fits (there are only a few possibilities; look for the one where two faces sit nicely together), then carefully slide it out and put that piece down on the table without disturbing its orientation, then do the same for the third piece. Now that you have determined the orientation of the three pieces, hold them in their orientations so that they are just on the verge of engaging, line everything up, and then just squeeze the three together.

Disassembly: Randomly jiggle and push on the pieces until you can get it to come apart just a bit. You can keep doing this until the puzzle comes apart, but as it comes apart a bit you should be able to find the right way to hold on to and push two of the pieces so that the puzzle slides apart, and you can just push and pull to make it expand and contract, where the third piece is being controlled by the movement of the other two that you are holding.

Here are two views of the puzzle in a partially expanded state:


--- 39 ---
Sonneveld Three Piece Burr

Designed by Dic Sonneveld, made by Tom Lensch, circa 1990.
(Walnut, 2.25 inches)

Three identical pieces come apart in simultaneous motion:


--- 40 ---
Triple Play

Designed by Jim Gooch,
made by Eric Fuller,
purchased from www.cubicdissection.com.
(three wood pieces, 2.9 inches)

At first this appears to be a three piece burr made with excess play in the fit. However, the extra play is just enough so that these three identical pieces come apart with a non-rectilinear movement.

--- 41 ---
Just The Three

Designed by J. Krijnen, made by E. Fuller 2008, unique level 7.
(Quilted Sapelle, 3 inches)

Here are steps ito dissassemble:




--- 42 ---
3 Piece Burr Yamaosa

Designed by O. Yamamoto, made E. Fuller 2008, unique level 4 with a twist.
(Walnut, 3 inches)

Here are steps ito dissassemble (there are two photos for the second step, which is a twist):




--- 43 ---
Three Open Windows

Designed by T. Jolly, made by E. Fuller and sold by Cubic Dissection 2008, level 6.
(Bloodwood, Wenge, Holly, 3 inches)

When assembled, one can look through the center holes in any of the three directions. Here are photographs of the six steps to disassemble, where step 2 is a twist:



--- 44 ---
GigaBurr & GigaBurr II

Designed by Bill Cutler 1999, made by Jerry McFarland, level 8.
(left: GigaBurr -Walnut, 2.2 inches; right: GigaBurr II - Cherry, 2.2 inches)

The 250 billion puzzles of this type were enumerated with a computer by Bill Cutler. The highest level (moves to remove the first piece) was 8, of which there were 80 different puzzles, where only 3 had only 9 internal voids. Two of these are the GigaBurr and GigaBurr II, and the third is a symmetric version of the GigaBurr II. To solve, two pieces can go together only one way, and then visualize the third piece in its final position to determine how to get it in and out. Here are photos of solving (the third sequence shows the symmetric GigaBurr-2 made by someone else):




--- 45 ---
CubieBurr Burr & Cubie Burr #2

Designed and made by Bill Cutler and Jerry McFarland 2001, level 6.
(left: Poplar / Walnut, 2.2 inches;
right: Cherry / Walnut / Wenge, 2.2 inches)

The basic design of the 3-piece GigaBurr and GigaBurr-2 was expanded to a 5x5x5 cube by gluing on edge and corner pieces. Cutler's computer search yielded three basic level 6 puzzles, of which these are two.

--- 46 ---
JA6PB - "Just Another 6-Piece Burr"

Designed by Bill Cutler.
(Walnut, 3.5 inches)

Four irregular shaped pieces and two ball bearings, which when assembled, look like a 6-piece burr. Falls apart easily.

--- 47 ---
Switch Board Burr

Designed by Jim Gooch, made by Eric Fuller, level 9.
(Pau Amerillo / Wenge / Bocote, 3 inches)

The pieces consist of a "block", two identical "rods" in symmetric orientations, and two identical "plates" in symmetric orientations. Orientate the puzzle as shown on the left below (the right rod will drop down as shown if the puzzle is not too tight), exchange the plates by passing them through each other, then the right plate (which was the left plate) can be twisted (in two ways) and removed (or without twisting it can be slid out together with the right rod).



--- 48 ---
Accordion

Designed by William Hu, made by Eric Fuller, 2014.
(4 pieces, White Oak, Chakte Viga, 2" x 2" x 3")

This is what the puzzler maker says about the puzzle:
"This seemingly simple puzzle uses a very interesting and difficult type of rotation. Ultra tricky and not like anything I've tried before. Level nine and fun...watch out, this one will have you pulling your hair out! Construction was tricky...the solid side spine and endgrain key pieces were fun to make, but very labor intensive. Fit is excellent; may be difficult to solve in highly humid environments due to the very close tolerances involved."
At first it looks like there is no way for it to come apart. If we number the pieces 1, 2, 3, 4 going from left to right, the trick to dissassembly is to tilt piece three and rotate piece two 90 degrees (clockwise as you look through the puzzle from left to right). The puzzle generally has a nice loose fit, but it is a tight fit at the point of the rotation.




--- 49 ---
Octo Burr

Designed byStewart Coffin, purchased from Cubic Dissection circa 2006.
(five wood pieces, 3.5 inches)

The 5 pieces give the appearence of four sets of two. The solution is not unique.


--- 50 ---
Simple 6-Piece Burr

Old design, level 1, no holes, notchable.
(six wood pieces, 3 inches)

The basic idea of level 1 with a key piece is described on pages 106 and 139-140 of the 1983 Hoffmann book. This one is even simpler. Pieces 1, 2, and 3 are identical, pieces 4 and 5 are identical, and piece 6 is a simple solid "key" piece that comes out first.



1. 2. 3.
4. 5. 6.

Assembly:
1. Place pieces 1 and 2 together to form an empty rectangle shape.
2. Lay piece 3 in the bottom of the empty rectangle.
3. Place pieces 4 and 5 on either side.
4. Slide in piece 6.

--- 51 ---
Simple 6 Piece Burr with Other Piece Shapes:

Made in Indonesia 2004.
(wood, 3 inches)

Made in Indonesia 2004.
(wood, 3.2 inches)

Purchased in the 1970's.
(plastic, 2.5 inches)

--- 52 ---
The Puzzle


a.k.a. Double Cross
Made in Japan, circa 1930?, level 1, no holes.
(six wood pieces, each 5/16 inches square by 2.4 inches long)

Another example of a Simple 6-piece Burr. Also in the theme of pages 106 and 139-140 of the 1983 Hoffmann book, but also simpler. Two identical pieces form an empty rectangle, a double notched piece goes in the bottom, two identical pieces go on each side, and the key piece slides in:



--- 53 ---
Double Cross (another example of The Puzzle)



Old design, level 1, no holes, notchable., circa 1960s-1980s??
(six aluminum pieces in a cardboard box, 2+3/8" x 2+3/8" x 1/2";
directions on the back of the box are shown above)

--- 54 ---
Mikado Block Puzzle

"Made by U.N. Co. N. Y.", circa 1920?, level 1, no holes, notchable, 2x2x8 pieces.
(cardboard box, 3.2 by 2.2 by 5/8 inches, and six 1/2" x 1/2" x 2" wood pieces)

Along wth the Yamato Block Puzzle, this puzzle is discussed on page 262 of the Puzzlers' Tribute Book in a chapter by Jerry Slocum and Rik van Grol on antique Japanese export puzzles. They show a picture from the 1915 C. J. Felsman Catalog of a Mikado puzzle saying "A problem of problems ...", and note that the sililar language here, "The puzzle of puzzles ...", is further evidence that although it says NY, it may in fact be a Japanese import. Here is what is on the cover and the inside of the cover:


--- 55 ---
Mikado Solution



--- 56 ---
Yamato Block Puzzle

"Made by U.N. Co. N. Y.", circa 1920?, level 1, no holes, notchable, 2x2x8 pieces.
(cardboard box, 3.2 by 2.2 by 5/8 inches, and six 1/2" x 1/2" x 2" wood pieces)

Along wth the Mikado Block Puzzle, this puzzle is discussed on page 262 of the Puzzlers' Tribute Book in a chapter by Jerry Slocum and Rik van Grol on antique Japanese export puzzles. Here is the solution sheet that came with it and a photo of another one of these puzzles where someone has labeled the pieces:



--- 57 ---
Devil's Knot



Made in Germany, level 1, circa 1940's?
(six wood rods, 3/8" square by 2+3/8" long, with solution sheet, in cardboard box)

--- 58 ---
Misfit Puzzle

"Pheno-Caffein Co.,Worchester, MA, circa 1910.
(wood, 2.1 inches)

The Pheno-Caffein Co. also made the Sectional Checkerboard Puzzle, and like that puzzle, one could obtain a solution:


--- 59 ---
Phenyo-Caffein Advertisement On The Back Of The Misfit Solution

--- 60 ---
Coffin's Improved Burr

Designed by Stewart Coffin level 3, 3 holes.
(six wood pieces, 3.5 inches)


--- 61 ---
Bill's Baffling Burr

Designed and made by Bill Cutler 1984, unique level 5, 7 holes.
(Red Oak, 3 inches; 24 assemblies with a unique solution)


--- 62 ---
L5 Notchable

Discovered (by computer) and made by B. Cutler 1987, unique level 5, 7 holes.
(Mahogany, 3 inches)


--- 63 ---
Computer's Choice 3-Hole

Discovered (by computer) and made by B. Cutler 1988, unique level 7, 3 holes.
(Cherry, 3 inches)


--- 64 ---
Computer's Choice 4-Hole

Discovered (by computer) and made by B. Cutler 1988, unique level 8, 4 holes.
(Maple, 3 inches)


--- 65 ---
Eight Is Enough

Designed by B. Cutler, made J. McFarland 2009, unique level 8, 7 holes.
(Maple / Walnut / Cherry, 2.8 inches)


--- 66 ---
Eight Is Enough Disassembly
Here are the first six steps:




Now the leftmost piece can be lifted up and out:


--- 67 ---
Compter's Choice 5-Hole

Discovered (by computer) and made by B. Cutler 1988, unique level 9, 5 holes.
(Walnut, 3.5 inches)


--- 68 ---
The Piston Puzzle

Designed by P. Marineau, made by J. McFarland 1986, unique level 9, 7 holes.
(Walnut, 3 inches)


--- 69 ---
Computer's Choice Unique-10

Designed by Bill Cutler 1990, unique level 10, 7 holes.
(Mahogany, 3.5 inches)

One of 18 similar unique level 10 burrs discovered by Bill Cutler with a computer program. It can be disassembled by moving (1) C /E forward 1 unit, (2) F up 2 units, (3) A back one unit, (4) D /F right 1 unit, (5) F down 2 units, (6) F forward 1 init, (7) D left 1 unit, (8) A/E back one unit, (9) B/C/F right one unit, (10) B down one unit. Note that some would consider this 11 moves since for "move" 8, both A and E can move back without dragging the other. To assemble, rather than inserting B into the pieces appropriately oriented, it may be easier to orientate things with CD facing up, and hold A/D/E (appropriately positioned) in your left hand and B/C/F (appropriately positioned) in your right hand to perform steps 10 and 9.


--- 70 ---
L46AA Notchable

Discovered (by computer) and made by B. Cutler 1987, level 10, 9 holes, notchable.
(Maple, 3.6 inches)

Non-unique with solutions below level 10, but made to be unique level 10 by drawing diagonal lines on the pieces that must form a loop around the puzzle when solved.


--- 71 ---
Mega Six

Designed by Brian Young, made by Mr. Puzzle Australia, level 10, 8 holes.
(4.7 inches)

Unique Level 10 solution. One more hole than Computer's Choice Unique-10, with 20 assemblies instead of 7. Here is the solution that was sold with it:

--- 72 ---
Love's Dozen

Designed by Bruce Love 1987, made by Bill Cutler, level 12, 9 holes.
(Maple, 3 inches)

According to Bruno Curfs' page, Love's dozen has 89 solutions ranging from Level 3 to one of the solutions being level 12; this puzzle made by Bill Cutler has a big D drawn on a pair of the ends that forces the level 12 solution.



Further Reading
Curfs' Page, from: http://home.tiscali.nl/~bcurfs/homepage/burrs/burrs-e.htm

--- 73 ---
139 Burr

Designed and made by Bill Cutler; can't be disassembled.
(Red Oak, 4.5 inches)

From his computer analysis, Cutler determined that 139 was the largest number of states that a standard 6 piece burr could have without having a solution, and then he chose the simplist of these for this puzzle. So this burr is made to the dimensions of a normal 6-piece burr, has lots of movement, but can't be disassembled (it was made by gluing two portions of a piece together during assembly).

--- 74 ---
Twelve Points To Insanity

Purchased from Mr. Puzzle Australia 2006, level 1, no holes.
(six wood pieces, 3.5 inches)

Mr. Puzzle Australia credits this puzzle as being sold as early as 1875, and as having been sold under a number of names, including the Cluster, the Gem Cut Puzzle, the Chestnut Burr, and the Snowflake. When assembled it looks like a standard version of the Simple Six Piece Burr (where pieces have a diamond cross section). However, it actually is composed of six identical pieces where two assemblies of three slide together.


--- 75 ---
Dragon Fly

Made in Japan circa 1930?, level 1.
(cardboard box and 6 wood pieces, 3.75 inches;
box cover similar to other vintage Japanese exports like the Yamato Puzzle)

--- 76 ---
Butterfly

Made in Japan circa 1930?, level 1.
(cardboard box and 6 wood pieces, 3 inches;
box cover similar to other vintage Japanese exports like the Yamato Puzzle)

Here is the solution sheet that came with it:

--- 77 ---
Explode-A-Burr

Designed by Bill Cutler 1965, purchased circa 2000, level 1.
(six wood pieces, 3.5 inches)

Six identical pieces with some angled internal cuts that slide apart simultaneously.

--- 78 ---
Programmer's Nightmare

Discovered (with a computer) and made by Bill Cutler 1989, level 5, 7 holes.
(Maple, 3.5 inches)

A programmer's nightmare because disassembly requires a twist. Move F up 1/2 unit, rotate A 90 degrees, move A up (pulling F with it by 1/2 unit), move D up, slide D out. Note that although the 1/2 move is needed theoretically, there is enough play in the puzzle that F can initially be moved up a full unit (this does not change the level since A has to be moved up in any case). This puzzle is hard for a person too, because according to Cutler's computer analysis, there are 102 assemblies (ways these pieces can exist in space in the solved shape) with only this one solution (the only way that is achievable starting with the pieces apart).


--- 79 ---
Holey Astigmatism

Designed and Made by Bill Cutler 1994, level 7, 4 holes, notchable.
(Cherry, 2.25 inches)

Bill Cutler credits Stewart Coffin with the idea of making burrs with slanted pieces in a way that restricts the number of possible assemblies. Cutler then found a non-unique level 7 burr from his computer analysis which became unique when made with slanted pieces. Slide F forward, slide E left (pulling D with it), slide E forward, push D right, slide F back, slide F right, remove A:


--- 80 ---
U-Nam-It Burr

Designed by Bill Cutler.
(Walnut, 3 inches)

Slide F back and then remove the three pieces A, C , E simultaneously by expanding them out to the upper left:


--- 81 ---
Bill's Ball Bearing Burr

Designed by Bill Cutler1986, spin + level 3.
(Red Oak with two steel ball bearings, 3.5 inches)

Spin the puzzle in the orientation shown (around the axis defined by E and F) to position the balls, and then the two halves A,C,F and B,D,E can slide apart with three moves:


--- 82 ---
Blind Burr

Designed by Gregory Benedetti, made by Maurice Vicourouz 2012.
(Purple Heart, 3.25 inches)

Pieces are a small cube trapped in the center, three identical "simple pieces", and three identical "complex" pieces. Assembly is relatively easy, where the three complex pieces and the cube are put compactly together as shown on the left in the figure below (rubber bands keep them together for the photo) and then the three simple pieces slide simultaneously over the exposed corner:



Disassembly requires simultaneous motion to move the three complex pieces together into the "key position" shown on the left below. One first has to identify which three are the complex pieces and then carefully jiggle and push to get all three to push in flush. In the middle is this position lit up from the back (where the serial number of the lower in-out piece can be seen), and on the right is shown the top three pieces coming apart simultaneously. The puzzle's name comes from the fact that when you don't know what is inside this puzzle, disassembly may be achieved by accident when randomly shaking and pulling on the puzzle.


--- 83 ---
Luxemburr

Designed by Matti Linola, made by Eric Fuller 2010.
(Yellowheart and Wenge, 3 inches)

Once one sees how to solve the three piece burr formed by the light colored pieces, the dark pieces don't change the puzzle very much, but the construction and fit is terrific.

To solve:
  1. Take out the dark pieces, to first solve the 3-piece burr.
  2. Start with the simple U shaped piece and see that because each piece has to slide over one of the other two, there is only one way the other two can go, and then assemble the three pieces.
  3. Now look down each end, and it can be seen that there is only one way the dark pieces could possibly fit.
  4. Then take apart the three light pieces, insert the dark pieces, and push everything back together, moving the dark pieces in and out as needed.
Here are photos of the assembly progressing:



--- 84 ---
Around The Bend

Designed by Frans de Vreugd 2005, purchased from Mr. Puzzle Australia.
level 5, 3 hole, notchable, six 2x2x6 pieces with end caps.

(Queensland Silver Ash with Queensland Blackbean ends, 3.125")

A variation of the standard 6 piece burr where end caps have been added to the pieces; highest level for this type of burr with notchable pieces. Here is a diagram of the puzzle and the pieces (numbers are the order they can be removed):


--- 85 ---
Frantix

Designed by Stewart Coffin (puzzle no. 9), made and sold by Interlocking Puzzles 2000.
(wood, 6 identical pieces and 6 corresponding identical pieces, 2.6 inches)

A variation of the 1890 Altekruse burr with pins and holes for some of the notches; shown on page 79 of the Coffin Book. Below are photos of one way for inserting pieces 3 through 11; piece 12 is then added to complete the two halves as shown above, which then slide together.




--- 86 ---
Dovetail Burr

Designed by Frans de Vreugd, purchased from Bits and Pieces 2007, level 6.
(wood, 3.75 inches)


--- 87 ---
Lock Nut

Designed by Stewart Coffin (design number 105)
Sold in 2006 by Cubic Dissection (www.cubicdissection.com)
(left Bocote / right Cocobola, both 3.25 inches)

Can be solved in two ways using the same pieces; the left above is solved using coordinate motion (all pieces moving together at the same time), and the right above is solved by halving two halves that slide together. The hardest part is trying to visualize what it should look like together once it is apart. Here is what the two solutions look like when starting to come apart:


--- 88 ---
Missing Notch

Designed by Stewart Coffin, Made by Eric Fuller 2012.
(Canarywood, a 13/16" cube and 6 pieces 3" long by 13/16" square)

The six pieces assemble with coordinated motion into a standard 6-piece burr shape with the cube trapped in the middle. I found the maniputlation of these pieces a bit unpleasant and gave up (at least for the moment - it would have probably felt better if I had solved it). Here is the description quoted from the puzzle maker's page:
"This puzzle was Jarry Slocum's exchange puzzle at IPP18. I was recently visiting a puzzle friend and saw it on the shelves. Spent some time working with it and finally solved it... HAD to make it. Since John Rausch did such a nice job writing up a description on his site, I think I'll plagarize from it directly:
"Four of the six pieces have diagonal notches on both sides of the large, simple notch. Two pieces have them on only one side. Normally, a six-piece burr consisting only of pieces with a single, large, simple notch could not be assembled. With the diagonal notches described, it becomes a coordinate motion puzzle - a difficult one! Number 129a in Stewart's numbering system. He made 100 in 1998."
I have modified the design a little bit based on Nick Baxters advice - instead of two pieces having only one notch, one piece does (leaving the other five with double notches). After some experimentation I felt that this configuration was the trickiest, and really made the solver grasp the concept behind the puzzle. Finaly, this puzzle is by nature very loose when solved. It's just a function of the notch location. I hate loose puzzles, so I included a 7th piece, which is an internal cube with magnets. This doesn't really add to the assembly, but it keeps the puzzle nicely together once solved. Happily it also makes the puzzle much more difficult to disassemble!"

--- 89 ---
Three Pieces Puzzle

a.k.a. Triple Play
Purchased from Bits and Pieces 2007.
(wood, 3 inches)

Looks like three pieces but is actually a level 1 non-standard 6 piece burr (six pieces (three light wood and three dark wood pieces). Here is the solution that came with the puzzle:


--- 90 ---
Tri Again

Designed by F. Potts, made by E. Fuller 2008, purchased from Cubic Dissection.
(Walnut and Maple, 3 inches)

Six pieces with magnetic tips assemble to look like a three piece burr (e.g., Just The Three). The pieces are all identical; here are photos of different views of them:


Here are photos of pulling apart the whole assembly and an assembly of four:


The solution is almost as much of a dexterity puzzle as a logic puzzle, where there is only one way to put two together that will lead to a solution, then it is easy to spread them apart and put in the next two, then harder to spread apart the four to get in the fifth, and then after pushing everything back together, a bit tricky with only two hands to get in the sixth piece. Here is a photo of the assembly of four with the two remaining pieces still to be put in:

--- 91 ---
Zauberflote

Designed by Gregory Benedetti, made by Eric Fuller 2011.
(Acrylic, Yellowheart, 2.25 inches)

Here is what the puzzle maker said about this puzzle in the sale listing:
"Reminiscent of Padaung Rings, this nifty little pocket puzzle is a lot of fun to solve. With a level 14.4.2 it's tricky but not impossible ... once you get the correct alignment and piece selection, it flows fairly quickly."

--- 92 ---
Zig-Zag Knot

Copyright ThinkFun 2010.
(plastic, 2.75 inches square)

Comes with a solution booklet that has 37 steps to disassemble reading forward and 37 steps to assemble by flipping over the booklet and reading in the other direction.

Further Reading
Booklet pages.

--- 93 ---
Chen's Six Board Burr


Designed by Chi-Ren Chen, made by Eric Fuller 2012, unique level 2.
(Walnut, Ash, American Mahogany, 3")

--- 94 ---
Chocolate Dip Burr

Designed (with a computer) by Bill Cutler and Frans de Vreugd 2001, level 13
(Hard Maple and Jatoba, 2.25 inches)

Two 1x4x6 pieces in each dimension. Making top dark wood and the bottom light wood makes the level 13 solution unique. The number of "holes" (internal voids) is 13 because the volume of assembled shape if it was solid is 104, and adding up the volume of the six pieces gives 91. Here are sheets that came with the puzzle (copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler).



--- 95 ---
Gordian Knot

Purchased from ThinkFun 2006.
(plastic, 6 pieces, 2.75 inches)

Made by D. Alsmeyer 2007, Sabriday Puzzles.
(6 different woods, 3.5 inches)

The booklet that comes with the retail plastic puzzle shows 65 steps to completely take the puzzle apart. McFarren's Page shows a solution that removes the first piece in 28 steps, and completely takes the puzzle apart in 35 steps.

Further reading:
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/gordian.htm
Sabriday's wood description (Mahogany, Maple, Cherry, Purpleheart, Walnut, Paduk).

--- 96 ---
Bent Board Burr #2


Designed and made by Franz de Vreud 2003, unique level 16.
(Maple and Granadillo, 2.9 inches assembled)

--- 97 ---
1960's Japanese Shape Burrs
a.k.a. Kumiki Puzzles

These were made in Japan and owned by J. A. Storer in the 1960's. The Cleverwood Page credits these simple types of burrs to Tsunetaro Yamanaka (born 1874) and his descendants; here is a diagram of a cube from the 1942 Filipiak book, and an inexpensive circa 2000 plastic ball:



Further Reading
Cleverwood Page, from: http://www.cleverwood.com/kumiki.htm

--- 98 ---
Directions That Came With The Cube

Directions That Came With The Ball

--- 99 ---
Drueke Burrs - Bill's and Marian's Puzzles


Wm. F. Drueke & Sons, Grand Rapids, MI, circa 1940's?
(wood pieces in cardboard box, 2+5/8" x 2+5/8" x 2+5/16" high)

Examples of some classic relatively simple burrs that have been made by many over the years (e.g., see the Japanese Shape Burrs). Historical acounts indicate that Bill and Marian were Drueke family names.

Further Reading
Drueke Family History, from: www.peterspioneers.com/WRSD.htm
Drueke Directory, from: www.peterspioneers.com/WRSDdir.htm
C. Bloom Grand Rapids Press Article, from: www.peterspioneers.com/WFD.htm
Cribbage Board Article, from: http://www.cribbageboardsonline.com/article2005b.pdf

--- 100 ---
Uranus

Designed by Junichi Yananose, made by Eric Fuller.
(7 wood pieces, 3 inches)

Looks at first like a standard 6-piece burr. However, one of the apparent pieces is really two pieces.

--- 101 ---
The Miyako Wooden Puzzle

Made in Japan, circa 1930?, level 1, no holes.
(cardboard box, 2.6" x 2.1" x 7/16", 9 wood pieces, and solution sheet;
box cover similar to other vintage Japanese exports like the Yamato Puzzle;
this puzzle was also made in a 22-piece version)

Here are photos of basic solution steps:



--- 102 ---
The Aeroplane Block Puzzle


"Patent number 35588, Made In Japan", circa 1920's?
(10 wood pieces in a 3.75" x 2.4" x 1/2" cardboard box)

Easy to see how it goes together, but a bit of a dexerity puzzle to put the final piece in; two of the rectangle pieces have bevels to make that work (on on the inside middle and one on both edges).

--- 103 ---
Sydney Harburr Bridge

Designed by P. McDermott, made by B. Young and P. McDermott,
purchased from Mr. Puzzle Australia in 2007, level 6.

(wood, 10 pieces, 3.25 by 6.25 by 2.5 inches)

Here are the directions and solution that were sold wih the puzzle:





--- 104 ---
Bill's Ball Buster

Designed by Bill Cutler.
(wood, 3.5 inches, 11 pieces and 5 ball bearings)

Eleven pieces in a 2-4-5 configuration. Takes 5 balls (it came with 4 inside and you are asked to put the 5th in). Two are in a notch near the top of 11. The other three can be in a portion of the bottom part of piece 11 when it is pushed up, but in order to get 11 in place, they must be shaken out into other places that lock up the other pieces. Number the ends as follows:



Disassembly:
1. Jiggle the balls if necessary and move 11 up.
2. Two balls are always in a notch near the top of 11;
   jiggle the other three so that they are in a cavity at the bottom of 11.
3. Slide 8 up (1 and 2 get dragged with it).
4. The balls will now all fall out.
5. Slide 5 out.
6. Slide 11 out.
7. Slide 3 and 10 out.
8. Remove 7 and 9.
9. Remove 4.
10. Remove 6.
11. 1, 2, and 8 now come apart.
Assembly:
1. Assemble the puzzle without the balls by reversing the disassembly.
2. Slide 11 and 8 up (8 gets 1 and 2 dragged with it).
3. Put the two balls in the top and then slide a pencil through
   the puzzle to keep them from coming out.
   Then turn the puzzle over and put the other three balls in.
4. Slide 8 down (dragging 1 and 2 with it) as you carefully remove your pencil.
5. Shake the three balls so they leave the bottom of 11; then slide 11 down.

--- 105 ---
Hectix

a.k.a. Hexsticks, Notched Hexagonal Sticks
Patented by S. Coffin 1973, made by 3M 1970,
also discovered independently by B. Cutler.

(12 plastic pieces, 3.5 inches)

Three solutions for assembling the twelve notched sticks are described on pages 116-118 of Coffin's book. The package is shown above; it has the directions on the bottom (also shown above) and inside is a hexagonal shaped solution booklet. Below are two panels from each side (other three are shown on the next page):


--- 106 ---
Hectix Solution Pages Continued


Further Reading
Coffin Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 3,721,448
Cutler's Hectix Page, from: http://home.comcast.net/~billcutler/stock/hectix.html
Cutler's Hectix Revisited Page, from: http://home.comcast.net/~billcutler/stock/revisited.html

--- 107 ---
Locked Blocks

S.S. Adams Co., 1961.
(12 plastic pieces, each 1.5 by 3/8 by 3/8 inches)


--- 108 ---
Block Puzzle Senior

S.S. Adams Co., 1961.
(12 plastic pieces, each 1.5 by 3/8 by 3/8 inches)


--- 109 ---
Satellite Burr



Purchased from Bits and Pieces 2007.
(10 wood pieces with solution sheet, 4.5 inches;
shown as "The Mystery" on pages 107-108, 141-142 of the 1893 Hoffmann book)

--- 110 ---
H Burr

Copyright 1991-2007 Junichi Yananose, purchased in Japan 2010.
(aluminum, 12 pieces, 3.5 inches square)

Here is the box and the text on the front and back:



The puzzle slides apart in two halves and a free piece:


--- 111 ---
H Burr Solution Sheet

--- 112 ---
Sears Tower

Designed by Bill Cutler and made by Jerry McFarland 2003.
(Walnut, 12 pieces, 2 by 2 by 8 inches)

Here is the sheet that came with the puzzle (copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler):


--- 113 ---
Wausau '81

Designed by Bill Cutler 1981.
(Maple / Walnut / Cherry, 3.7 inches, 12 pieces)

--- 114 ---
Wausau '82

Designed by Bill Cutler 1982.
(Maple / Walnut / Cherry, 4 inches, 13 pieces)

--- 115 ---
Wausau 83


Designed by B. Cutler in 1983, made by Mr. Puzzle Australia 2008, level 11.
(Queensland Silver Ash / Queensland Blackbean / Mackay Cedar, 14 pieces, 4";
sold with directions and solution shown above)

--- 116 ---
Wausau 84

Designed by B. Cutler 1984, made by E. Fuller 2008.
(Maple / Walnut / Mahogany, 15 pieces, 4 inches)

--- 117 ---
Burry Joint

Designed by Bill Cutler and made by Jerry McFarland 2000.
(wood, 3 inches, 13 pieces + 2 pins)

Looks like the Wausau '82 puzzle, but different inside; here are excerpts from the puzzle sheet (copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler):
  1. Position the puzzle on a table so the group of three are vertical and the group of six with the dot is facing you, with the dot on the right (upsidedown from the figure).
  2. Give the puzzle a hard spin clockwise to move the pins into their holes.
  3. Simultaneously, the center rod of the three goes up, the rod with the dot comes out toward you, and the rod to its left goes back away from you. You will see the pins in the ends of the rod with the dot and the one next to it (take them out so you don't lose them).
  4. Now the puzzle comes apart.

--- 118 ---
Lassen Risti

Designer unknown, made by Eric Fuller.
(Purpleheart / Maple / Lacewood, 13 pieces, 2.25 by 3 by 3.75 inches)

Here is what Eric Fuller says:
"This 13 piece interlocking burr puzzle was published in the magazine Soumen Kuvalehti number 11 in 1926. There are 2 possible solutions, both very similar. Despite its not being a high level puzzle, the solution is surprisingly tricky, probably because of its unusual shape. Ishino Keiichiro posted it on his site and Matti Linkola discovered the magazine."

--- 119 ---
Old Oak Of England


Level 1, circa early 1900's??
(4" wood box with directions and 18 wood pieces, 3.6 inches assembled;
right vertical piece in photo above is solid key piece.)

--- 120 ---
Lattice

Designed by Bill Cutler 1975.
(Maple / Walnut / Cherry, 3.6 inches, 18 pieces)

--- 121 ---
Quadlock1

Designed 1992 and made by Jerry McFarland, purchased from cubicdissection.com 2008.
(Walnut, Mahogany, Maple, 19 pieces, 3.5" by 2.6" high, 7/8 inch square sticks)

Disassembly involves manipulating the central 4 pieces like opening a lock.
Here is the diagram of the pieces from the solution sold with the puzzle and photos of removing three pieces:



Further Reading
Solution that was sold with the puzzle.

--- 122 ---
The Pacco Puzzle

"Made in Japan K.K.", circa 1920's?
(20 wood pieces, 4 inches;
box cover similar to other vintage Japanese exports like the Yamato Puzzle)

Two pairs of identical 4" pieces, four identical 2.5" pieces, eight identical 1.3" pieces, and four identical 1.3 inch solid pieces assemble to a somewhat two-dimensional snowfake arrangement; here is a photo of the box and the solution sheet:




--- 123 ---
Q.E.D.

Purchased from Pentangle Puzzles 2007.
(wood, 7.5 inches, 20 pieces)


--- 124 ---
Miyako


Made in Japan, circa 1930?, level 1, no holes.
(cardboard box, 4.1" x 3.4" x 1/2", 21 wood pieces, and solution sheet;
this puzzle was also made in a 9-Piece Version)

--- 125 ---
Binary Burr

Designed by Bill Cutler and made by Jerry McFarland 2003, level 85.
(Cherry / Walnut, 21 Pieces, 3 by 3 by 3.6 inches)

The Binary Burr functions like the Chinese Rings puzzle:



There are six "ring" pieces that must be manipulated in order to remove the "bar" piece; the remaining 14 pieces don't move and form the "cage' that constrains the movements. It basically takes two moves for each move of the corresponding Chinese Rings puzzle.

--- 126 ---
Visible Burr

Designed by Bill Cutler 1978, made by J. McFarland 2012.
(24 Maple, Walnut, and Cherry3/4" rods, 5.25" square assembled)

--- 127 ---
Visible Burr Solution Page 0
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 128 ---
Visible Burr Solution Page 1
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 129 ---
Visible Burr Solution Page 2
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 130 ---
S/M 24 Burr

Designed by Bill Cutler 1978, made by J. McFarland 2012.
(24 Maple, Walnut, and Cherry3/4" rods, 4+3/8" square assembled)

--- 131 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 0
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 132 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 1
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 133 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 2
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 134 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 3
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 135 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 4
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 136 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 5
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 137 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 6
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 138 ---
SM24 Burr Solution Page 7
(copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler)

--- 139 ---
Fusion Burr

PDesigned by L. Kleinwaks, made by Eric Fuller 2013.
(Walnut, Cherry, Maple, 2.25" x 2.25" x 4")

--- 140 ---
Four Burr Stick

Purchased from Interlocking Puzzles 2000.
(wood, 2.5 by 2.5 by 9.8 inches)

Four standard 6-piece burrs that share one dimension. Pieces 4, 8, and 10 are identical, pieces 1, 5, and 15 are identical, pieces 12 and 16 are identical, pieces 11 and 14 are identical, and pieces 9 and 13 are identical:


--- 141 ---
Four Burr Stick Solution Sheet:

--- 142 ---
Four Burrs

Designed by Wayne Daniel 1982, made by Interlocking Puzzles.
(wood, 4.8 inches)


--- 143 ---
Lost Day

a.k.a. Eight Burrs
Designed by David Bruce, made by Interlocking Puzzles 2000.
(wood, 24 pieces, 4.8 inches)

The basic idea is to combine two eight piece assemblies and then add eight "outer" pieces. Here are diagrams of the pieces from the solution that came with the puzzle:

Assembly A pieces:


Assembly B pieces:


Outer pieces pieces:


Further Reading
Lost Day solution that was sold with the puzzle (pdf 9 pages).

--- 144 ---
Berserk BurrCirc

Purchased from Interlocking puzzles 2002.
(13 ply Baltic Birch rings 7.2", Australian Jarrah rods 2.25", 18 pieces)

Four 6-piece burrs connected in one dimension by a pair of rings. Requires multiple counter rotations of the rings to disassemble or assemble. Interlocking Puzzles said:

"The eight radial pieces have slightly angled notches and can be sorted into four right handed and four left handed pieces. The eight axial pieces have normal notches. The four unique higher level burrs are distinctly different. The lengths of the burr rods are greater than 6 units. If these were four stand alone burrs they would require five, four, or three moves to get the first piece out. One of them would also require three moves to get the second piece out. It is a fun challenge to assemble each individual burr onto the rings and then remove it before facing the larger challenge of the whole puzzle."


--- 145 ---
Solution sheets that came with the Berserk BurrCirc:

--- 146 ---
Oskar's Cube

Purchased circa 2000.
(plastic, 2.25 inch cube with 3D cross)

Similar idea to the Two Piece Oddity, with a frame and a 3D cross like piece that has to be removed.

--- 147 ---
Two Piece Oddity

Designed by Tom Jolly, made by Eric Fuller circa 2000.
(T'Zalam, 3 inches)

A frame and a 3D cross like piece that has to be removed.

--- 148 ---
Pair Dance

Designed by Osanori Yamamoto, made by E. Fuller 2013, Level 14.
(Jatoba and Purpleheart, 2.25" x 1.5" x 1.8")

To disassemble, exchange the two trapped pieces, maneuver a bit, and then the two can be manipulated out of the cage; here are some selected positions:



--- 149 ---
Three Sticks Trapped

Designed by Stephane Chromine, made by Eric Fuller, 2011.
(Walnut and Yellowheart, 3" x 2.25" x 1.5")

The top two pieces are identical. Different assemblies are possible depending on how the top two pieces are rotated. In their easiest positions, the bottom piece can be removed in 8 moves. However, in one configuration, 12 moves are required to remove the bottom piece (given a reasonable way of counting rotations). Below are 9 of the positions for disassembly starting with the top piece rotated as the puzzle was shipped. Although the middle piece starts in its correct rotation for the final steps of disassembly, after pulling out and tilting down the bottom piece, the middle piece is rotated and drops down to allow the top piece to be rotated, and then the middle piece can be pushed up and rotated back so that the top two pieces are together and up to allow the bottom piece to be removed. Note that it now takes only 8 steps to put the puzzle back together by leaving the top two pieces in their existing rotations.




--- 150 ---
Three Trapped Sages


Designed by Ramos & Abad, made by Pelikan 2006, level 13.
(wood, 2.4 inches)

--- 151 ---
Pandora's Box

a.k.a. Internal Combustion
Designed by Tado Muroi early 1990's.
(left: "Pandora's Box", Mr. Puzzle Australia, Queensland Blackbean, 3.5x3.5x2.25";
right: "Internal Combustion", Bits and Pieces, Aluminum, 2.25" x 2.25" x 1.5";
described in Boardman's book)

Four burr pieces (two of which are identical) in a frame. Below is a 9-step assembly (6 steps to remove the first piece) based on the piece orientations shown on the right above (except in the photo above the left two have been flipped upside-down for better viewing):

1. 2. 2.
4. 5. 6.
7. 8. 9.

--- 152 ---
The Solution Sold With Pandora's Box
A 12-step assembly where the piece labeled 3 is reversed from the 9-step assembly shown on the preceding page:


--- 153 ---
The Solution Sold with Internal Combustion
A 15-step assembly (see also the Boardman book):


--- 154 ---
Spacemine




Designed by Yavuz Demirhan, made by Eric Fuller 2013.
(Sapele and Imbuya, 2.25" square, level 4)

--- 155 ---
Locked Sticks

Purchased from Bits And Pieces, 2008.
(wood, 3.4 inches square assembled by 7/8 inches thick, with solution sheet)


--- 156 ---
Two Halves Cage

Designed by Gregory Benedetti, made by Eric Fuller 2012.
(Sapele and Wenge, two halves of the cage and 6 pieces, 2+5/8" square)

--- 157 ---
Constrained Burrs

Designed by Logan Kleinwaks, made by Eric Fuller 2013.
(right, "Bookend Burr", Holly, Walnut, Ash, 2.5"x2.25"x2.75", level 10;
(middle, "Clamped Burr", Holly, Walnut, Ash, 2.25"x 3"x2.6", level 15;
right, "Cornered Burr", Walnut, Cherry, Ash, 2+5/8" square, level 14)

Beautifully made with high levels for rectlinear moves solutions. Shorter solutions may be possible with non-rectilear moves. For example, to remove a piece from the Cornered Burr with just three moves and some additional twisting, start by sliding the top piece to the right (if it looks like on the left below, re-orient the puzzle so it looks like the right photo below), then slide the front piece left, then up, and now, although it is easier by first sliding the bottom piece to the right, it can be twisted out without any further movement of other pieces.



--- 158 ---
Simple 6-Piece 6-Solutions Burr Set

Sold by Interlocking puzzles 2000.
(wood, 2.5 inches)

The only set of 6 notchable pieces that can be assembled into 6 different level 1, no-hole, standard six piece burrs. Here is the solution that was sold with the puzzle:


--- 159 ---
JCC 13 Piece Burr Set

Designed and made by Jean-Claude Constantin, purchased used 2006.
(13 pieces, set is 6.25" x 3.25 x 2.5 inches, each piece is 3/4 x 3/4 x 3 inches)

A set of 13 pieces to make 40 different notchable 6 pice burrs; the same set of 6 is sometimes used for several different problems (pieces in different positions). Each piece is 2 by 2 by 8 units.

JCC's 40 Problems:
1. ADFIKL
2. ADFIKL
3. ABDKLM
4. ABDKLM
5. ABDKLM
6. ACDKLM
7. ACDKLM
8. ACDKLM
09. ADGHKL
10. ADEJKL
11. AFGIKL
12. AFIJKL
13. AEGIKM
14. AFHJLM
15. ADHIKM
16. ADEFLM
17. ACGKLM
18. ACGKLM
19. ACJKLM
20. ACJKLM
21. ABGKLM
22. ABGKLM
23. ABJKLM
24. ABJKLM
25. ADEIKM
26. ADEIKM
27. ADFHLM
28. ADFHLM
29. AGHIKM
30. AGHIKM
31. AEFJLM
32. AEFJLM
33. BCFIKL
34. BCFIKL
35. BEFHIM
36. BEFHIM
37. BEFHIM
38. BEFHIM
39. BEFHIM
40. BEFHIM

JCC's Solution Hints:
1. AK-LI-FD
2. AL-KF-DI
3. AM-IK-BD
4. AL-MK-BD
5. AK-ML-DB
6. AD-MC-KL
7. AD-KC-ML
8. AD-LC-KM
09. AL-KH-GD
10. AK-LE-DJ
11. AK-GF-LI
12. AL-JI-FK
13. AK-GE-MI
14. AL-JH-FM
15. AD-IH-KM
16. AD-FE-ML
17. AL-KC-GM
18. AM-KC-GL
19. AK-LC-MJ
20. AM-LC-KJ
21. AK-MG-BL
22. AK-LG-BM
23. AL-MJ-KB
24. AL-KJ-MB
25. AK-ME-DI
26. AM-KE-DI
27. AL-MH-FD
28. AM-LH-FD
29. AM-IH-KG
30. AK-IH-MG
31. AM-FE-JM
32. AL-FE-JL
33. BI-LC-FK
34. FB-CK-LI
35. BE-HF-MI
36. BH-EI-FM
37. FH-EM-BI
38. EI-MH-FB
39. EH-FM-BI
40. EH-MI-FB


--- 160 ---
CCH Level 1 Key Piece Burr Set

Purchased from Creative Craft House 2007.
(wood box 3.4" x 9.25" x 4.1" with 27 wood pieces, each 3.1" long by 3/4" square)

This set has 27 2x2x6 unit standard 6-piece burr pieces numbered from 0 to 26, where piece 0 is the solid piece. A total of 69 different level 1 standard 6-piece burrs can be selected, where all use piece 0 as a key piece, and the other 5 pieces are specified with a tic-tac-toe notation:




--- 161 ---
CCH Pieces and Sample Solutions:

--- 162 ---
Interlocking Puzzles Burr Set

Made by Interlocking Puzzles 2000.
(7 x 6 x 3.4 inch Jarrah box with 42 Chechen pieces, each 3/4 x 3/4 x 2.4 inches)

25 distinct notchable 2 x 2 x 6.5 unit pieces, indexed from A to Y, a total of 42 pieces including duplicates, which can be used to assemble the 314 different level 1 six piece burrs that have no holes. The set comes with five puzzle cards and five solution clue cards that list the pieces in order from 1 to 6 according to where they belong in the diagram above. This set does not contain all possible notchable pieces; just has the pieces necessary (and enough copies) to make all 6-piece notchable burrs with no holes. Also, some higher level burrs can be constructed with this set; for example, L5 Notchable is OODXNL and Holey Astigmatism is TYLLUM. Note that because the pieces are more than 6 units long, there are some higher level burrs that don't quite work, but would if the pieces were exactly 6 units long.

1. Puzzle Descriptions
001 ALLXXX 022 CDPPYY 043 ADDVYY
002 BBTYYY 023 CDPPYY 044 ACMXYY
003 AHTYYY 024 CDPPYY 045 ADMXYY
004 AKTYYY 025 ALPXYY 046 AILOUY
005 ALLUXY 026 ALSVYY 047 AILOUY
006 BBXXYY 027 ALSWYY 048 AJLNUY
007 BETYYY 028 BCPXYY 049 AJLNUY
008 AKXXYY 029 BCPXYY 050 AKVXYY
009 ALSXYY 030 BDPXYY 051 AKWXYY
010 ACLUYY 031 BDPXYY 052 AMMXYY
011 ACLXXY 032 ELPTYY 053 BCPWYY
012 ADLUYY 033 AFLRYY 054 BCPWYY
013 ADLXXY 034 AGLQYY 055 BCPWYY
014 ALTUYY 035 ALMXXY 056 BDPVYY
015 LLPPXX 036 ALTVVY 057 BDPVYY
016 ACCXYY 037 ALTWWY 058 BDPVYY
017 ADDXYY 038 BBVXYY 059 CLPPXY
018 ALMTYY 039 BBWXYY 060 CLPPXY
019 AMSYYY 040 BLPXXY 061 DLPPXY
020 BLPTYY 041 LPPSYY 062 DLPPXY
021 BPSYYY 042 ACCWYY 063 ACLWXY
1.  Puzzle Solution Clues
001 XXAXLL 022 PYPDCY 043 VYAYDD
002 YYBBTY 023 YPPCDY 044 XYAMYC
003 YYAHYT 024 YYPPCD 045 XYAMDY
004 YYAKYT 025 PXALYY 046 UYALOI
005 UXAYLL 026 YVAYSL 047 UYAOLI
006 XXBBYY 027 WYAYSL 048 UYALJN
007 YYBEYT 028 XPBCYY 049 UYANJL
008 XXAKYY 029 XYBPYC 050 XYAKYV
009 YYAXLS 030 PXBDYY 051 XYAKWY
010 UYAYLC 031 YXBPYD 052 MMAXYY
011 XYAXLC 032 YYPELT 053 YPBCWY
012 UYAYDL 033 RYALFY 054 YPBCYW
013 XYAXDL 034 QYALYG 055 YYBPWC
014 YYAULT 035 XXAMLY 056 PYBDVY
015 XXPPLL 036 VYAVLT 057 PYBDYV
016 YYAXCC 037 WYAWTL 058 YYBPVD
017 YYAXDD 038 XYBBYV 059 XPPCLY
018 YYAMLT 039 YXBBWY 060 XYPPCL
019 YYAMYS 040 XXBPYL 061 PXPDLY
020 YYBPTL 041 YYPPLS 062 YXPPLD
021 YYBPYS 042 WYAYCC 063 WXAYCL

--- 163 ---
IP Burr Set Cards 2 and 3:
2.  Puzzle Descriptions
064 ADLVXY 085 AGLOVY 106 ANPQYY
065 AJRTYY 086 AFLNWY 107 ANPQYY
066 AIQTYY 087 AFLNWY 108 AOPRYY
067 AMPYYY 088 ANOSXY 109 AOPRYY
068 ANQSYY 089 ANOSXY 110 AOPRYY
069 ANQSYY 090 ANOSXY 111 BHNOTY
070 ANQSYY 091 BBVWYY 112 BLPVXY
071 AORSYY 092 BNQTTY 113 BLPWXY
072 AORSYY 093 BORTTY 114 LNPQTT
073 AORSYY 094 ANOTUY 115 LOPRTT
074 BCFRYY 095 ANOTUY 116 ACNOUY
075 BDGQYY 096 ANOTUY 117 ACNOUY
076 BFRTYY 097 BQRSYY 118 ACORXY
077 BGQTYY 098 BQRSYY 119 ACORXY
078 BMMUYY 099 ACNOXX 120 ADNOUY
079 ALNOUX 100 ADNOXX 121 ADNOUY
080 ALNOUX 101 ALMVXY 122 ADNQXY
081 ALNOUX 102 ALMWXY 123 ADNQXY
082 ALPVYY 103 ALQRXY 124 AINOOU
083 ALPWYY 104 ALQRXY 125 AJNNOU
084 AGLOVY 105 ANPQYY 126 AMNOTY
2.  Puzzle Solution Clues
064 VXAYLD 085 VYAOLG 106 PYANYQ
065 RYAJTY 086 WYALFN 107 PYAYNQ
066 QYAIYT 087 WYANFL 108 OPAYYR
067 MPAYYY 088 NOAXSY 109 PYAORY
068 NQAYSY 089 NYAXSO 110 PYAYRO
069 QYANYS 090 OYAXNS 111 ONBHYT
070 QYAYNS 091 YYBBWV 112 XYBPVL
071 ORAYYS 092 QNBTYT 113 YXBPWL
072 RYAOSY 093 ORBTYT 114 QNPTLT
073 RYAYSO 094 NOAUTY 115 ORPTLT
074 YRBCYF 095 NYAUTO 116 NUAYCO
075 QYBDYG 096 OYAUNT 117 UYANOC
076 YRBFYT 097 QYBRYS 118 RXAOCY
077 QYBGYT 098 YRBQYS 119 RXAYCO
078 MMBUYY 099 NXAXCO 120 OUAYND
079 UXALON 100 OXAXND 121 UYAODN
080 UXANOL 101 XYAMLV 122 QXAYND
081 UXAOLN 102 XYAMWL 123 QXANYD
082 PYALYV 103 RXALQY 124 NUAOIO
083 PYALWY 104 QXALYR 125 OUANNJ
084 VYALOG 105 NPAYQY 126 NOAMTY


3.  Puzzle Descriptions
127 AMNOTY 148 BDQRXY 169 BPQRYY
128 AMNOTY 149 CDPQRY 170 BPQRYY
129 BNOPTY 150 CDPQRY 171 BNOSUY
130 BNOPTY 151 CDPQRY 172 LNOPST
131 BNOPTY 152 CDPQRY 173 NOPPSY
132 BNOSTY 153 ENOPTY 174 NOPPSY
133 CFLPRY 154 ENOPTY 175 NOPPSY
134 CLPPWY 155 ENOPTY 176 AFNNOW
135 DGLPQY 156 HLNOPT 177 AGNOOV
136 DLPPVY 157 ACMVYY 178 AMNOXX
137 FLPRTY 158 ADMWYY 179 ANNQQX
138 GLPQTY 159 ALORVX 180 AOORRX
139 LMMPUY 160 ALORVX 181 ANOTVV
140 AIOTVY 161 ALNQWX 182 ANOTWW
141 AJNTWY 162 ALNQWX 183 ANOSVY
142 ANOPXY 163 AMQRYY 184 ANOSVY
143 ANOPXY 164 AMQRYY 185 ANOSWY
144 ANOPXY 165 BMPVYY 186 ANOSWY
145 BCQRXY 166 BMPWYY 187 COPPRY
146 BCQRXY 167 BFIORY 188 COPPRY
147 BDQRXY 168 BGJNQY 189 COPPRY
3.  Puzzle Solution Clues
127 NYAMTO 148 QXBRYD 169 YPBQYR
128 OYAMNT 149 QYPDCR 170 PYBRYQ
129 NYBPTO 150 QYPRCD 171 ONBUYS
130 YOBPTN 151 YRPCDQ 172 ONPSLT
131 NOBPTY 152 YRPQDC 173 NOPPSY
132 ONBSYT 153 NOEPTY 174 NYPPSO
133 YRPCLF 154 NYEPTO 175 YOPPSN
134 YPPCLW 155 YOEPTN 176 OWANNF
135 QYPDLG 156 ONPHLT 177 NVAOGO
136 PYPDLV 157 YYAMCV 178 MXAXNO
137 YRPFLT 158 YYAMDW 179 NNAXQQ
138 QYPGLT 159 VXALOR 180 OOAXRR
139 MMPULY 160 VXAOLR 181 NVAVTO
140 VYAIOT 161 WXANQL 182 OWAWNT
141 WYAJTN 162 WXALQN 183 VYANOS
142 PXAONY 163 MRAYYQ 184 NVAYSO
143 PXANYO 164 MQAYRY 185 OWAYNS
144 PXAYNO 165 MPBVYY 186 WYAOSN
145 XRBCYQ 166 PMBWYY 187 POPRCY
146 XRBQYC 167 ORBIYF 188 PYPRCO
147 QXBDYR 168 QNBJYG 189 YOPPCR

--- 164 ---
IP Burr Set Cards 4 and 5:
4.  Puzzle Description
190 CLPQRX 211 AORTWY 232 ACNOWX
191 CLPQRX 212 AORTWY 233 ADNOVX
192 DLPQRX 213 BNPQWY 234 BCQRWY
193 DLPQRX 214 BNPQWY 235 BCQRWY
194 DNPPQY 215 BNPQWY 236 BDQRVY
195 DNPPQY 216 BNPQWY 237 BDQRVY
196 DNPPQY 217 BOPRVY 238 BIOPWY
197 LPQRSY 218 BOPRVY 239 BJNPVY
198 LPQRSY 219 BOPRVY 240 LNPPQX
199 ACQRYY 220 BOPRVY 241 LOPPRX
200 ADQRYY 221 FILOPR 242 ACNQXY
201 AFNORY 222 GJLNPQ 243 ADORXY
202 AFNORY 223 ILOPPW 244 AMNOUY
203 AGNOQY 224 JLNPPV 245 BNPQXY
204 AGNOQY 225 LMPPVY 246 BNQSWY
205 AMNQXY 226 LMPPWY 247 BOPRXY
206 AMNQXY 227 LNOPSU 248 BORSVY
207 AMORXY 228 LPPQRY 249 CNOPPX
208 AMORXY 229 LPPQRY 250 DNOPPX
209 ANQTVY 230 ACIOWY 251 ANOPVY
210 ANQTVY 231 ADJNVY 252 ANOPVY
4.  Puzzle Solution Clues
190 XRPCLQ 211 ORAWYT 232 WXAOCN
191 XRPQLC 212 RYAWTO 233 VXANOD
192 QXPDLR 213 NYBPWQ 234 YRBCWQ
193 QXPRLD 214 YPBQWN 235 YRBQWC
194 NPPQDY 215 PNBWYQ 236 QYBDVR
195 NYPPDQ 216 NPBQWY 237 QYBRVD
196 YPPQDN 217 YOBPVR 238 OPBIYW
197 QYPRLS 218 OPBVYR 239 PNBJYV
198 YRPQLS 219 PYBRVO 240 XPPQLN
199 RYAYCQ 220 POBRVY 241 PXPRLO
200 QYAYRD 221 ORPILF 242 NYAXCQ
201 ORANYF 222 QNPJLG 243 OYAXRD
202 RYANFO 223 OPPILW 244 MUAYNO
203 NQAOGY 224 PNPJLV 245 XPBQYN
204 QYAONG 225 MPPVLY 246 QNBWYS
205 MNAXYQ 226 PMPWLY 247 PXBRYO
206 MYAXNQ 227 ONPULS 248 ORBVYS
207 MOAXRY 228 YPPQLR 249 XOPPCN
208 MYAXRO 229 PYPRLQ 250 NXPPDO
209 NQAVTY 230 WYAOCI 251 NPAOVY
210 QYAVNT 231 VYANJD 252 PYAONV


5. Puzzle Descriptions
253 ANOPWY 274 BNOPWX 295 ANOQRV
254 ANOPWY 275 LMNPQU 296 ANOQRW
255 BMNQUY 276 LMOPRU 297 CDQQRR
256 BMORUY 277 LNPPQW 298 CDQQRR
257 ACNQWY 278 LOPPRV 299 CDQQRR
258 ACNQWY 279 ACORVY 300 CDPQRY
259 ADORVY 280 ADNQWY 301 CDPQRY
260 ADORVY 281 AMNQWY 302 CFNOPR
261 ANQQRY 282 AMORVY 303 CNOPPW
262 ANQQRY 283 BNQQRW 304 COPQRR
263 AOQRRY 284 BOQRRV 305 DGNOPQ
264 AOQRRY 285 COPQRR 306 DNOPPV
265 LNPQSW 286 DNPQQR 307 DNPQQR
266 LOPRSV 287 BMQRVY 308 FNOPRT
267 ALQRWY 288 BMQRWY 309 GNOPQT
268 ALQRVY 289 LMPQRV 310 NOPPQR
269 AMNOVX 290 LMPQRW 311 NOPPQR
270 AMNOWX 291 AINOQW 312 NOPPQR
271 ANOQRX 292 AJNORV 313 NOPQRS
272 ANOQRX 293 AMNQVY 314 NOPQRS
273 BNOPVX 294 AMORWY
5.  Puzzle Solution Clues
253 OPANYW 274 NXBPWO 295 NRAOVQ
254 PYANWO 275 MNPULQ 296 OQANRW
255 MNBUYQ 276 OMPULR 297 RQQDRC
256 OMBUYR 277 PNPWLQ 298 RQCRDQ
257 NWAYCQ 278 OPPVLR 299 RQCDRQ
258 WYANQC 279 RYAOCV 300 RPQDYC
259 OVAYRD 280 QYANWD 301 PQCRDY
260 VYAODR 281 MWAYNQ 302 RNCPOF
261 NRAYQQ 282 MVAYRO 303 PNCPOW
262 RYANQQ 283 NRBQWQ 304 RPQROC
263 OQAYRR 284 QOBRVR 305 OQPDGN
264 QYAORR 285 QOPRCR 306 OPPDVN
265 QNPWLS 286 NRPQDQ 307 PQQRDN
266 ORPVLS 287 MRBVYQ 308 RNFPOT
267 QYALWR 288 QMBWYR 309 OQPGTN
268 RYALQV 289 MRPVLQ 310 PPQRON
269 NXAMVO 290 QMPWLR 311 PNQPOR
270 OXAMNW 291 NWAOIQ 312 OPPRQN
271 QXAONR 292 OVANRJ 313 RNQPOS
272 RXANQO 293 NYAMVQ 314 OQPRSN
273 XOBPVN 294 OYAMRW

--- 165 ---
IP Burr Set 25 Distinct Pieces:

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

--- 166 ---
IP Burr Set 25 Example, The DGNOPQ Burr
Puzzle number 305 is {D,G,N,O,P,Q}. The solution hint 305 lists the order {O, Q, P, D, G, N). Looking at the burr figure we can make the correspondence:
1 = O
2 = Q
3 = P
4 = D
5 = G
6 = N
With this correspondence, one can see from the figure where each piece goes in the solved puzzle (but not which way to flip or rotate it), and this can make it a fun, but still not too easy, to solve the puzzle. The trick for this one is to first see how the pieces must fit together when solved, and then realize that the only way to put it together is to put three together into one half, three together in the other half, and then slide the three halves together:



--- 167 ---
Interlocking Puzzles Burr Set #2

Made by Interlocking Puzzles 2000.
(6.6 x 5.75 x 3.2 inch wood box with 42 wood pieces, each 3/4 x 3/4 x 2.25 inches)

35 distinct notchable 2 x 2 x 6 unit pieces, indexed with numbers in the range 0 to 56 (as shown above), a total of 42 pieces including duplicates, which can be used to assemble most of the level 5 standard 6-piece burrs. Uses David Winkler's numbering. Four puzzle and clue cards that list the pieces in order from A to F according to the diagram above.


--- 168 ---
IP2 Burr Set Cards 3 and 4:


--- 169 ---
IP2 Burr Set Distinct Pieces:

00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

28

29

30

32

33

34

35

38

39

40

44

45

46

49

53

56

--- 170 ---
Cube Assembly

Assembling a cube shape from pieces is so common it merits its own category. Most of these puzzles leave you with a bag of pieces when unassembled, but a few, such as Hinged Cubes and Kev's Cubes are manipulation puzzles where you can pick it up, play with it, and put it down unsolved to continue later.

--- 171 ---
Soma Cube




Copyright 1966 Piet Hein,
produced in Denmark by Skj0de of Skjern for Parker brothers, No. 1050.

(4" box with wood pieces, metal base, and instruction booklet, 3.1" assembled)

Six of the 7 pieces are formed from 4 unit size cubes and the last piece isformed from 3 unit size cubes; the goal is to assemble them into a 3x3x3 cube. This is a relatively easy puzzle with many solutions. John Rausch credits the invention of this puzzle to Piet Hein in 1936.

Further reading:
Stewart Coffin's book, from: http://www.johnrausch.com/PuzzlingWorld/chap03a.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/soma/soma.htm
Lagoon Solution, from: http://www.give-me-a-clue.com
Johnson 1988 Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,784,392
Johnson 1989 Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,844,466

--- 172 ---
Half Hour

Designed by Stuart Coffin circa 1975, made by Cubic Dissection 2002.
(6 pieces, bocote, 2.25 inches square assembled)

Here is what Coffin says in The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections:

"The six-piece version of the 3 x 3 x 3 cube will be considered first. For aesthetic reasons, one might prefer that all the pieces be the same size, but this is impossible, so the nearest approximation is to use three four-block pieces and three five-block pieces. It is also desirable that all pieces be non-symmetrical but this is likewise impossible so two of the four-block pieces will have an axis of symmetry. All pieces will of course be dissimilar. Of the several thousand such combinations possible the author tried several that proved to have either multiple solutions or no solution, until finally finding one with a unique solution."

Here is the solution hint that was sold with the puzzle:


--- 173 ---
IP Five Piece Cube

Designed and made by Interlocking Puzzles circa 2001.
(5 pieces, 3 inches square assembled)

A similar theme, but not the same set of pieces as the 5 piece version of the 3x3x3 cube suggested by Stewart Coffin in Figure 55 of The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections.

--- 174 ---
Coffin Quartet


Designed by Stuart Coffin (circa 1975), Made by Interlocking Puzzles (circa 2001)
(4 pieces, 3 inches square assembled)

The photo on the right above shows the four pieces in their relative orientation for assembly. Here is what Coffin says in The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections:

"With puzzles of this type, there are an optimum number of pieces; and as you tinker with them, you soon gain an intuitive sense of what that number is. There is no way that a four-piece version can be very difficult, although the one shown in Fig. 51 does have the intriguing property of being serially interlocking, meaning that it can be assembled in one order only. Is a five-piece serially interlocking version possible?"

--- 175 ---
Four X

Made by AussieStuff Puzzles, purchased from Mr. Puzzle Australia, 2006.
(13 pieces, wood, 6 inches)

Thirteen pieces, each designed from unit cubes, are assembled into a 4x4x4 cube; can also be assembled into a 4 x 16 rectangle. Here is the solution that was sold with the puzzle:


--- 176 ---
Bedlam Cube

Purchased from UK3, 2006.

Here is a photo of the other three sides:


--- 177 ---
Century Cube

Purchased from Creative Craft House 2007.
(wood, 3.1 inches)

Named because the designer's wife commented that it would take a century to solve; here are the first few steps of dissassembly:



--- 178 ---
The solution that was sold with the Century Cube:

--- 179 ---
Patio Block

Designed by Stewart Coffin circa 1975, made by Interlocking Puzzles 2001.
(8 pieces, maple and bloodwood, 2 inches square assembled)

The wood used to make this puzzle gives a clue to the solution with symmetric color shown above; the photos below show three basic steps to this solution:


It is not unique, here are two views of another solution:


Stewart Coffin, in his book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections, describes the derivation of this puzzle as starting with all possible pairs of joined 1x2x2 blocks (where the resulting 10 pieces can be assembled into a 4x4x5 solid in 25 different ways) and then eliminate the two rectangular pieces (the 1x2x4 piece and the 2x2x2 piece) to see if the remaining 8 pieces can be assembled into a cube. He then goes on to say that they cannot be so assembled, but that one can be eliminated and one duplicated to make a set that can. He also notes "an interesting pattern of symmetry" in the solution.

The 1986 patent of Guenther describes puzzles where pieces are formed from pairs of rectangular solids.

Further reading:
Guenther Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,534,563

--- 180 ---
Patio Block MPA


"Just a Little Packing Problem #1",
made by Mr. Puzzle Australia, purchased 2006;
basic idea by Stewart Coffin circa 1975.

(8 pieces, Tasmanian Oak, 2 inches square assembled)

Like the Stewart Coffin Patio Block, puzzle, but with a slightly different set of pieces. The three photos below show basic solution steps:



--- 181 ---
Solution Sheet That Was Sold With Patio Block MPA

--- 182 ---
Splitting Headache


Designed by Bill Cutler 1991, made by Cutler / McFarland / Peterson.
(wood, 2.5 inches)

Pieces formed from black and white unit cubes and half unit cubes (starred above) must be assembled to a 3x3x3 cube with a checkerboard pattern on all sides. The solution is unique and does not follow the checkerboard pattern in the hidden center.

--- 183 ---
Quadro Cube

Designed by V. Genel, sold by Puzzleman.com, circa 2000?
(Zebrawood and Walnut, 2+5/8 inches)

Four beautifully cut pieces ome apart in pairs:



--- 184 ---
Diagonal Cube

Designed by S. Coffin 1971, made by T. Lensch 2008.
(Marblewood and Brazilian Blackwood, 2.2 inches;
sold with a piece diagram piece diagram and an assembly diagram)

Described in Coffin's book, six identical pieces are augmented to make 6 different non-symmetric pieces, where two groups of three slide together diagonally:



--- 185 ---
Cubes And Pegs

Basic idea by Stewart Coffin, made by J. Storer 1989.
(purple heart with light wood dowels, 3 inches)

Stewart Coffin proposed this class of puzzle to make a 2x2x2 cube from 8 unit cubes, where each has three mutually perpendicular holes, and a total of 12 dowels are inserted into 12 of the 24 holes. He observed that the holes have one of two "reflexive forms", and that puzzles could be made by having all pieces of one form or having 4 with one and 4 with the other. The cubes of this puzzle all have the left form; the photos show basic solution steps:




--- 186 ---
Cubes And Pegs Version B


Basic idea by Stewart Coffin, made by J. Storer 1989.
(top: purple heart with dowels, 3 inches;
bottom: rosewood with dowels, 2.25 inches)

Like the Cubes and Pegs puzzle, except here 4 pieces have one form and 4 the other (the pattern of pegs in the soluton to this puzzle is different from Coffin's Book Fig. 193):



--- 187 ---
L-Bert Hall

Designed by Ronald Kint-Bruynseels, made by Eric Fuller 2007.
(walnut box and 9 cocobolo pieces with pegs, 2.5 inches)

Nine identical 3-unit L-shaped pieces with pegs added to assemble in a unique solution to a 3x3x3 cube. Here are basic solution steps:



--- 188 ---
Five Minute Puzzle

Patented by Andy Turner, made by Eric Fuller 2010.
(Oak box 2.75" square by 2.1" high, Bubinga puzzle 2.2" square)

Don't read any further; have some fun first. This puzzle is quite hard until one sees the trick, and then it is almost impossible to forget how to solve it.

The two 1x2 pieces have double holes at one end that naturally entices one to use them, but in fact these two faces butt against each other in the unique solution (no pegs going between them), and then the puzzle solves easily. Here are four photos in sequence of assembly:



--- 189 ---
Corner Block

Designed Stewart Coffin, made byInterlocking Puzzles 2000.
(7 pieces, bloodwood and aluminum, 3 inches)

There are a total of 7 pieces; 2 pieces formed from 5 unit cubes with holes and rods, 4 pieces formed from 4 unit cubes with holes and rods, and one 3 unit long rod. They must be assembled into a 3x3x3 cube (there is a unit void in the center). Stewart Coffin proposed this class of puzzles and suggested this particular selection of pieces as one that has a "satisfactory" set of two solutions. Below are two stages of a solution for which the last piece placed before the rod is the T, and two stages of a solution for which the last piece placed before the rod is the Z:




--- 190 ---
Pieces Of Eight

Designed Stewart Coffin; left Interlocking Puzzles 2005, right Coffin circa 1980.
(left: mahogany, eight pieces, 3.25 inches,
right: mahogany, walnut, szjo, eight pieces, 2.75 inches;
right is one of 6 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in the early 1980's)

Featured in a December 1991 article in Fine Woodworking Magazine. Described in Stewart Coffin's book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections; here is some of what he says in the directions that came with the puzzle:
"Special version - only one made. No half-pieces, so ignore puzzle problems that require half-pieces. The cube has only one solution in which all sides have matched wood and grain symmetry."
The pieces are the eight ways to glue together a basic U-shaped piece; below are the pieces of the Interlocking puzzle version, the one made by Stewart Coffin pulled apart, and his grain pattern:



The wood and grain restriction has only one solution, but on the other hand, you are given clues how to do it. For example, there is just enough walnut to go around (a total of 8 squares), and so the solution cannot have any of the walnut squares hidden in the middle. For the single wood version, here is one of the solutions:


--- 191 ---
Interlocking Puzzles Solution
For the single wood version, Interlocking Puzzles said that there are 7 solutions each with a symmetric version; here is the solution sheet that was sold with the puzzle:


--- 192 ---
Groovy Cubes

Designed Rick Eason 2004, purchased from Mr. Puzzle Australia 2006.
(Burdekin Plum, 2.4 inches)

The solution is unique and made more difficult due to 3 "false solutions" (arrangements that could exist in a solved state but there is no order of assembly to achieve any of them). Below are photos of two steps in the solution and the sheet that came with the puzzle:




Further reading:
Winter Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 6,241,248

--- 193 ---
Twenty Cube

Designed by Rick Eason 2001, made by John Devost 2007.
(Bocote and Cherry, 4 pieces, 2.4 inches square;
as described on Rick Eason's Page, this puzzle was also mass produced as
"Confusion Puzzle Mental Block" shown on the right above - wood 2.9" square)

Four pieces formed from unit cubes and rods of dimensions 1/2 by 1/2 by 2.5 units.
The photos below show the four pieces positioned to be assembled, and pairs put together; the final step slides these two halves together to get the solved cube shown above.



Further Reading
Rick Eason's Page, from: http://www.mechanicalpuzzles.org/puzzles/index.html
Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lagoon-CONFUSION-PUZZLE-MENTAL-BLOCK/dp/B004KYNB76

--- 194 ---
Rik's Kiddy Wrapping

Designed by Kevin Holmes and Rik Van Grol, made by Eric Fuller 2009.
(Peruvian Walnut and Spalted Oak, 2.7 inches)

A beautiful and fun puzzle; here are photos of assembly:



--- 195 ---
Folding Cubes

a.k.a. Magic Cube
Circa 2000.
(laminated cardboard with Andy Warhol art, 2.75 inches)

Unlike the Hinged Cubes puzzle, this puzzle is trivial to solve and is more of a toy than a puzzle. The cube shown above, can be unfolded in two different ways to form a 2 x 4 array, and then in both cases that 2 x 4 array can be folded lengthwise to form another 2 x 4 array:



--- 196 ---
Hinged Cubes

Copyright James A. Storer 2009; U.S. patent 8,393,623 March 2013.
(Kingwood with brass hinges, 2.25 inches square assembled)

Fold the eight cubes into a larger 2x2x2 cube; there are 7 hinges:



Hinge 1 joins cube 2 to cube 1, on the front faces.
Hinge 2 joins cube 3 to cube 2, on the back face of 3 and the right face of 2.
Hinge 3 joins cube 4 to cube 3, on the top faces.
Hinge 4 joins cube 5 to cube 4, on the front faces.
Hinge 5 joins cube 6 to cube 5, on the left face of 6 and the right face of 5.
Hinge 6 joins cube 7 to cube 6, on the back face of 7 and the front face of 6.
Hinge 7 joins cube 8 to cube 6, on the top faces.

A fun but not too hard puzzle; when left on a coffee table, people often spend 30 minutes or so to solve it (about right for a coffee table audience). Not only is there something very satisfying about the solid feel of real hinges, but they also tend to suggest a straightforward folding one cube at a time, which inevitably leads to a position like the one shown on the right above.

--- 197 ---
Kev's Snake Cubes

a.k.a. Snake Cubes, Serpent Cubes, Cubra Cubes
Designed by Trench Puzzles circa 1985, made by Jim Storer 1988.
(bloodwood, 2.8 inches assembled)

Twenty seven cubes are threaded together with an elastic cord to form a "snake" that can be folded up by rotating adjacent cubes with respect to each other; the object is to form a 3 by 3 by 3 cube (where none of the elastic cord shows).




Many puzzles are possible by threading different patterns. If you imagine the cubes alternately colored red, black, red, ..., then the solved 3x3x3 cube will have red cubes at the corners and the face centers. The Kev pattern is has a unique solution where the snake ends are face centers.

Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/snakecube.htm
Mark Weston's Page, from: http://www.cs.uvic.ca/~mweston/snakes.html
Eryk Vershen's Page; from: http://cantaforda.com/cfcl/eryk/puzzles/chain_cube.html
Dreyer Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 3,222,072

--- 198 ---
Cubra Cubes

a.k.a. Snake Cubes, Serpent Cubes
Same idea as Kev's Snake Cubes, but a different pattern.
(2 inches square)

The Cubra Cubes are the same idea as Kev's Snake Cubes, but come in a number of different patterns; this is the first pattern shown on Mark Weston's Page:
"A solution can be described by a string of "directions" that the cube follows when you wrap it into a cube, either Right, Left, Up, Down, Forward, or Back. So for example if a solution starts R R F L ... then put the end of the snake with the rest trailing off to the Right, then the next cube goes in the same direction (it must be a straight-through cube), the next cube (a corner cube) turns to point Forward, then it goes Left, etc."
Solutions:
R R F L U U F D D R U B B L L F D F U U B B R R F F
R R U L F F U B B R F D D L L U B U F F D D R R U U"
Unlike Kev's Cubes, a solution starts and ends in the corners, and is not unique. Here is a solution that is provided for the Lagoon version of this puzzle (the same as the first one above, with the directions R-L, F-B, U-D all reversed):



Further reading:
Mark Weston's Page, from: http://www.cs.uvic.ca/~mweston/snakes.html
Lagoon Solution, from: http://www.give-me-a-clue.com

--- 199 ---
Packing
(including 2D Shapes)

Packing puzzles typically require one to fit pieces into a tray (two dimensional) or a box (three dimensional), although sometimes the problem is to fit the pieces into a particular shape. Perhaps the most well known example, which as been around for centuries, is the tangram, where the goal is to use the same set of simple two dimensional shapes to make many different shapes.

--- 200 ---
Checkerboard Puzzle

a.k.a. All Square Novelty Puzzle, Check-A-Board, Tyr & Do It,
Famous Checkerboard Puzzle, Weekly Telegraph Chessboard Puzzle

Left: Made 1940's by a relative of J. A. Storer who lived in up-state New York.
(wood cigar box and painted pieces cut from 1/4" masonite, with 1" squares)
Right two: J. F. Friedel Co., Syracuse, N.Y, circa 1940's.
(6.5 by 8 by 1" cardboard box and 12 cardboard pieces with 1+3/8" squares;
top edge says "Mfg. by J. F. FREDEL CO. Syracuse N.Y.";
bottom edge says "MFGS. REPRESENTATIVES POTTER & REAGAN")

Arrange the pieces to make a standard 8 by 8 checkerboard. There are 10 distinct pieces and two of the 5-unit Z's. Shown on pages 70-73 of the Haubrich book, which lists a unique solution (shown above). Here is another version made in Great Britian:



All Square Novelty Puzzle, Frederick Warne & Co.,
London and NY, circa 1930's?

(6.25 x 6.25 x 13/16 inch cardboard box
and 12 wood pieces based on 15/16" squares 1/8 inch thick;
directions on the back of the box)

Note: Frederick Warne & Co. is the publisher of
the 1893 Hoffmann book.

--- 201 ---
Sectional Checkerboard Puzzle


Patented by H. Luers and made by Selchow & Righter, NY, circa 1880.
(8.5 inches square by 3/4 inch cardboard box and 15 cardboard pieces, 14 distinct;
pieces based on 1 inch squares can be arranged in the box;
on the cover and pages 217-219 of the Haubrich book,
which lists this puzzle having 6,013 solutions;
solution on the left above is from Haubrich, and right is from the Luers patent)

--- 202 ---
Sectional Checkerboard Puzzle Continued, Inside The Box
Left is a solution a previous owner drew inside the box bottom, right is the label on the box top, and below is the label inside the box top.



--- 203 ---
Another Version Of The Sectional Checkerboard Puzzle
This version is nearly identical to the one shown on the previous pages, except the color of the label on the box top is a bit more brown than gray, and the pattern around the edge is a bit different (and this one has nothing inside the box top or bottom).



--- 204 ---
Sectional Checkboard Phenyo-Caffein Version


Phenyo-Caffein Co., Worcester, MA, circa 1900.
(5.25 inches square by 5/8 inch cardboard box and 15 cardboard pieces, 14 distinct;
pieces based on 5/8 inch squares can be arranged in the box;
also made with a wood box of the same dimensons and graphics)

The Pheno-Caffein Co. also made the Misfit 6 Piece Burr. The inside of the box bottom (on the right above) challenges the solver by stating that the dark square of the smallest piece can occupy any of the 32 dark squares. The sheet available from the company, on the next page, shows eight solutions (representing solution classes).

--- 205 ---
Solution Sheet From Phenyo-Caffein Co.



Further Reading
Luers Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 231,963

--- 206 ---
Chequers



a.k.a. Famous 'Bug House' Puzzle
Feltham Co., London, Royal Letters Patent 16,310, circa 1889.
(cardboard box and 14 thick cardboard pieces, 5" x 5" x 1/2";
box bottom has add for Feltham's tennis bat;
has a sheet that is the same as what is on the inside of the box bottom;
shown on pages 165-174 of the Haubrich book,
which gives the date and lists this puzzle as having 84 solutions; one is shown above)

--- 207 ---
Famous 'Bug House' Version Of Chequers

Franco, NY, circa 1948.
(cardboard box and 14 distinct metal pieces, 3.25" x 3.25" x 1/2")

--- 208 ---
The Bug House Puzzle

The Bug House Puzzle, E.I.H. Co. and F&K, 1912.
(cardboard box and 14 distinct metal pieces, 2.1 by 3.1 by 1/2 inches;
inside box top gives directions and manufacture;
shown on the cover and on pages 150-151 of the Haubrich book,
which gives the manufacture date,
identifies "E. I. Horsman Co." and "Forsheim & Koningsberg", NY,
and lists this puzzle as having 141 solutions, one of which is shown below)



Note: There were a number of variations of this puzzle made. This one is the same as page 150-151 of the Haubrich book if the pieces with dots in the photo above are taken to be black; however, the dots shown in the Haubrich book are not in the same locations.

--- 209 ---
Famous Baffling Checkerboard Puzzle


Vasen Mfg. Co., Davenport, Iowa, 1928.
(cardboard box and 14 distinct cardboard pieces, 4.25 by 4.25 by 5/8 inches;
inside box bottom says you can send 10 cents to get three different solutions;
shown on pages 158-164 of the Haubrich book,
which lists this puzzle as having 84 solutions, one of which is shown above)

Note: Pages 165-174 of the Haubrich book show puzzles that are the same except for the colors reversed, and pages 183-187 of the Haubrich book include the same box top where if the pieces for those puzzles have the colors reversed, they are the same except for one (and the same as Xcel Checkerboard Puzzle No. 1).

--- 210 ---
XceL Checkerboard Puzzle No. 1

Doyle Puzzle Co., Buffalo, NY, circa 1920?
(cardboard box 5.1"x5.1"x7/8", and 14 distinct cardboard pieces with 3/4" squares;
same as the Famous and Baffling Checkerboard Puzzle with colors reversed;
also made in a 13 piece version, the New XceL Checkerboard Puzzle No. 2;
shown on pages 183-187 of the Haubrich book,
which lists this puzzle as having 84 solutions, one of which is shown below)



Note: The Chequers Puzzle shown on page 97 of the 1893 Hoffmann Book is the same as a mirror image of this puzzle, except that puzzle shows only 63 squares, and can be corrected to make one of the three 4-unit L's be a 5-unit Z.

--- 211 ---
XceL Checkerboard Puzzle No. 2

Doyle Puzzle Co., Buffalo, NY, circa 1920?
(cardboard box 5.1"x5.1"x7/8", and 13 distinct cardboard pieces with 3/4" squares;
also made in a 14 piece version, the XceL Checkerboard Puzzle No. 1;
shown on page 122 of the Haubrich book,
which lists this puzzle as having 7 solutions,
5 of which a composed of two 4 by 8 solutions,
one of these 5 and one other are shown below,
where the black squares correspond to green and the white to black)


--- 212 ---
Gyro Checker Board Jig Saw Puzzle

Gyro Checker Board Jig Saw Puzzle, undated.
(3.5 by 6 inch envelope and 14 distinct cardboard pieces based on 1 inch squares;
shown on page 196 of the Haubrich book,
which lists this puzzle as having 598 solutions, one of which is shown below)


--- 213 ---
Draught Board Puzzle

a.k.a. Krazee Checkerboard Puzzle, Zebas Puzzle,
Banzee Island Checkerboard Puzzle, 59-444 Checkerboard Puzzle

Peter Pan Playthings, England, circa 1950.
(plastic box and 12 plastic pieces, 4.75 by 4 by 5/16 inches;
there are 11 distinct pieces, where there are two of the 6-unit L;
shown on pages 57-65 of the Haubrich book, which gives the manufacture date
and list this puzzle as having 11 solutions, one of which is shown above;
pages 60-65 show reflected with reverse colors patented by J. Avila-Valdez 1995)

Arrange the pieces to make a standard 8 by 8 checkerboard. Paper, shown below, is glued to the bottom inside of the box that gives a layout for quickly storing the pieces unsolved in the box. The bottom of the box is a non-transparent black plastic that does not allow you to see the back of the paper. However, by holding it up to the light one can see that the reverse side of the paper has instructions similar to the Krazee Checkerboard Puzzle, shown on the following page.



Further Reading
Avila-Valdez Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 5,403,005

--- 214 ---
The Krazee Version Of The Draught Board Puzzle



Krazee Checkerboard Puzzle, Plas-Trix Co., Jamica, NY, 1957.
(plastic box and 12 plastic pieces, 4.75 by 4 by 5/16 inches;
same puzzle as the Draught Checkerboard Puzzle shown on the previous page,
but the back of the box is clear to allow one to view directions;
also shown on pages 57-58 of the Haubrich book, which gives the manufacture date)

--- 215 ---
The Zebas Version Of The Draught Board Puzzle

Zebas Checkerboard Puzzle, Plas-Trix Co., Brooklyn, NY.
(plastic box and 12 plastic pieces, 4.75 by 4 by 5/16 inches;
same puzzle as the Krazee Checkerboard Puzzle shown on the previous page,
and also made by the Plas-Trix Co., but with different packaging)


Banzee Island Checkerboard Puzzle, made in Hong Kong.
(12 plastic pieces in plastic bag with cardboard top, 6.25 by 6.5 inches;
same puzzle as the Zebas Checkerboard Puzzle shown above,
the back of the package top refers to Chief Zebas)

--- 216 ---
Adams Idiot's Delight Checkerboard Puzzle


S. Adams Co. Neptune, NJ., Copyright 1958.
(6" by 4" cardboard package and six 3.5 by 2.5 inch puzzles,
the checkerboard and five others, including Magic T;
shown on page 167 of the Adams Co. History book;
shown on page 21 of the Haubrich book.
which presents the unique solution shown above)

--- 217 ---
Japanese 19 Piece Checkerboard Puzzle


Made in Japan circa 1940.
(wood box 3.8 by 3.75 by 7/16 inches thick and 19 wood pieces;
wood inlays on the box cover are 5/8 inch diameter;
paper stamp on the back is 1/2 inch square)

Purchased from someone who remembered it from his childhood in the 1940's. At some point in the past the following solution was drawn:



This puzzle has the same dimensions, style, and cover inlays as the 16 piece puzzle on page 233 of the Haubrich book. However, even if one assumes that the 1x1 pieces broke off of larger ones before the solution above was drawn, and taking into account rotations and reflections (the pieces are double sided), there is no way to make it the same (and no way to further combine pieces to make it the same as the 14 piece puzzle of the same style on page 177) Here are the 16 pieces if the 1x1's are joined to the pieces above them in the solution above:


--- 218 ---
Anchor Puzzle Tangram

a.k.a. Caricature, Cut-Up Square, Stone Tangram,
Union Stone Puzzle, Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 8

F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3.1" x 3.1" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, booklet, and solution booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1890;
described on pages 77-79, 96-97, 111-115, 128 of the 1893 Hoffmann book.
"casse tete" and "kopfzerbrecher" mean headache in French and German;
inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
inside of the box bottom has an add for "Dr. Richter's Pain-Expeller";
booklet has multi-language text inside covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 64 pages with 195 shapes to make,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
second booklet has solutions)

An old design known as the Tangram, dating back to ancient China; seven tiles, called Tans, can be used to make different shapes. The Richter Company of Germany, known for stone building blocks, started making this puzzle and others in 1891. It is number 8 of over 36; see The Anchor Puzzle Book, The Tangram Book, Slocum and Botermans books, and also the Richter Summary later in these pages. Many versions of the tangram have been made, some packaged as two squares of half the area:


--- 219 ---
Dr. Richter's Pain-Expeller
Richter (1846-1910) had a number of business besides stone building sets and puzzles, including selling medicines (see the Richter history on the Ankerstein Page). Many of the Richter puzzles have adds or testimonials to his pain medicine. The add below is on the inside of the box bottom of the puzzle on the preceding page.


--- 220 ---
The Anchor Puzzle Tangram Booklet
The text on pages A to Q at the start of the booklet that precedes the 64 pages of shapes is very similar to that in versions of a number of other Richter puzzles (e.g., see the corresponding pages for the Tormentor and Pythagoras puzzles). Page L describes how the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle; shapes 180 to 183 use the Circular Puzzle, shapes 184 to 187 use the Tormentor, shapes 188 to 191 use the Cross Puzzle, and shapes 192 to 195 use Pythagoras. An English description similar to what is on Page L is given in the description that came with the "Puzzle Drive" version shown below.










Note: These pages are shown in order (left to right, top to bottom), except that page 64 (pattern 195) is shown with page 1 (patterns 1 through 4).

--- 221 ---
A Shape Page Formed From The Booklet
This figure was extracted from the page scans shown on the preceding page; the patterns are in the order as in the booklet (left to right, top to bottom), except that page 64 (shape 195) is shown with page 1 (shapes 1 through 4).


--- 222 ---
The First 48 Pages of Shapes
The shapes on the first 48 pages need only the pieces of this puzzle. This figure was cropped from the figure of all shapes on the preceding page; the patterns are in the order as in the booklet (left to right, top to bottom), except that the last 4 patterns (page 48) are at the end of row 1.


--- 223 ---
Anchor Puzzle Tangram, Continued


(cardboard box 3.2 by 3.2 by 5/8 inches, 7 stone pieces, and two booklets;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
box is constructed with a lip on the bottom,
booklet cover says "The Anchor Puzzle 3rd Ed",
booklet inside cover for "Casse-Tete Persan" and cover for "Kopfzerbrecher",
which says that this is the "third edition" at a price of "15 kr.",
is followed by a 3 page French and German introduction,
followed by unnumbered pages of shapes similar to the puzzle on the first page,
followed by a final page, in German, that advertizes Anchor blocks
by referring to the picture on the back of the booklet;
second booklet is a work book with shapes to draw in and many blank pages)

--- 224 ---
Anchor Puzzle Tangram, Continued


(cardboard box 3 by 3 by 9/16 inches, 7 stone pieces, and two booklets;
similar to the version on the previous page;
a more compact box where the small bottom lip is hidden when the cover is on;
box top graphics and booklet front and back (shown above) are the same;
inside box bottom advertizes "ANCHOR PAIN EXPELLER" from 1890;
booklet is basically the same except it is in German and English;
booklet inside cover for for "Kopfzerbrecher" and "The Anchor Puzzle",
which says that this is the "third edition" at a price of "10 cents",
followed by a 3 page German and English introduction,
followed by unnumbered pages of shapes similar to the puzzle on the first page,
folloed by a final page, in English, that advertizes Anchor blocks
by refering to the picture on the back of the booklet)

--- 225 ---
Anchor Puzzle Tangram, Continued



(cardboard box 3.1 by 3.1 by 1/2 inches, 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
box bottom lists other puzzles for sale,
the booklet has 64 pages of the same 195 shapes as the puzzle on the first page,
along with the single loose double sided page of English directions shown above)
some versions have the same box cover with "UNION" instead of "ANCHOR"
and the same booklet cover with just "STONE PUZZLE" on a single line)

--- 226 ---
Anchor Puzzle Tangram, Continued



(cardboard box 3.1 by 3.1 by 5/8 inches, 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
box and booklet front show copyright, and booklet back shows the U.S. manufacturer;
the booklet has text on the insides of the covers and 48 pages
of the same 179 shapes as the first 48 pages of shapes on the first page;
unlike earlier versions of this puzzle, an explicit copyright date is shown)

--- 227 ---
Anchor Puzzle Tangram, Continued


(cardboard box 3.1 by 3.1 by 9/16 inches, 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has 64 pages of the same 195 shapes as the puzzle on the first page,
however its cover is blank, and there is no text explaining that
the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
the pages of this booklet were used for the scans shown earlier)

--- 228 ---
The Nine


a.k.a. All Nine, Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 1
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, late 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 2.7" x 4.4" x 1/2", 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1899;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 141 shapes to make,
the first of which is the star, which can be solved as shown above,
and where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle)

--- 229 ---
The Nine, Continued


(cardboard box 2.7" x 4.4" x 1/2", 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
booklet has the same shape pages as the one on the previous page,
but no additional text pages;
back of the box lists other puzzles)

--- 230 ---
Lightning Conductor



a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 2
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3.1" x 3.6" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1893;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 140 shapes to make;
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
the first four shapes are the rectangle, parallogram, triangle, and hexagon)

--- 231 ---
Lightning Conductor, Continued



Same size box and booklet as version on the preceding page.
The booklet starts with 16 not numbered pages, where the first 12 are a page of directions in 12 different languages, and the last 4 pages have multi-language text with a coupon that could be mailed in along with 15 cents to get solutions to all of the problems. Following these 16 pages are 48 pages of the same problems as the version on the preceding page. The booklet front cover, inside of the front cover, inside of the back cover, and the back, present the same text in 12 different languages; on the inside of the back cover, the English text says "Second book to The "Lightning Conductor" for drawing in the lines of solved problems." So it would appear to be the second of two booklets that originally came with the puzzle.

--- 232 ---
Lightning Conductor, Continued


Same size box and booklet as version on the preceding pages.
The booklet has 48 pages of the same problems as the version on the preceding pages.

--- 233 ---
Lightning Conductor, Continued


(cardboard box 3.1" x 3.7" x 1/2", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
German text on inside of front and back cover;
also has a loose sheet with directions in German;
same 48 pages with 140 shapes to make as puzzle on first page)

--- 234 ---
Egg Of Columbus / Magic Egg
(same pieces but different shapes than Richter 16 Magic Egg)



a.k.a. a.k.a. Columbus' Egg, Columbian Puzzle, Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 3
Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.1" x 4.1" x 9/16" with wood inserts, 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1893;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 111 shapes to make,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
there are no graphics on the back of the booklet)

--- 235 ---
EggOf Columbus, Continued


(cardboard box 3.1" x 4.1" x 1/2" with wood inserts, 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 32 pages with 95 shapes to make;
the booklet is the same as the one on the preceding page
except without the final 16 pages)

--- 236 ---
EggOf Columbus, Continued



(cardboard box 4" x 3.5" x 5/8" with cardboard insert, 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has Spanish and Hungarian inside the front cover and German inside the back cover,
and at the front are 3 pages of Spanish directions and 4 pages of Hungarian directions,
48 pages present the same pages as the puzzle on the first page,
where the figures have a shaded green texture as shown above)

--- 237 ---
Patience Prover


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 4
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 4.1" x 3.1" x 9/16", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1896;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 130 shapes to make,
where the directions state that the first is the square using only 6 pieces,
the second is the right triangle of 3/2 the height of the square using only 7 pieces,
all others use all eight pieces,
and where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle)

--- 238 ---
Patience Prover, Continued


(cardboard box 3.1" x 4.1" x 1/2", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
similar booklet with the same shapes as the version on the previous page)

--- 239 ---
Patience Prover, Continued


(cardboard box 3.25" x 4.1" x 9/16", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
same problem pages as the versions on the preceding pages,
but with no front or back matter, except for a loose double sided page
tucked under the cover - front and back shown above)

--- 240 ---
Trouble Killer


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 5
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3" x 3.6" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1893;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 108 shapes to make,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle)

--- 241 ---
Trouble Killer, Continued


(cardboard box 3" x 3.6" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with the same 108 shapes to make as the puzzle on the preceding page)

--- 242 ---
Trouble Killer, Continued


(cardboard box 3" x 3.6" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
this one is missing the booklet;
it came with some extra cardboard pieces
that are in the bottom of the box below the stone pieces)

--- 243 ---
Heart Puzzle



a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 6
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.5" x 3.5" x 9/16", 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1911;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 32 pages with 98 shapes to make;
the text above is on the box bottom under the puzzle)

--- 244 ---
Heart Puzzle, Continued



Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.5" x 3.5" x 9/16", 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
booklet has the same 32 pages with 98 shapes to make
as the puzzle of the first page, but no additional text;
included is one loose double sided page of text)

--- 245 ---
Heart Puzzle Problems

--- 246 ---
Heart Puzzle Solutions

--- 247 ---
Heart Puzzle Solutions Continued

--- 248 ---
Heart Puzzle Solutions Continued

--- 249 ---
Kobold


a.k.a. Goblin, Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 7
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, late 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3" x 4" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1899;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 143 shapes to make;
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
a previous owner has penceled in a solution to the first problem shown above)

--- 250 ---
Circular Puzzle


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 9
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3.6" x 3.6" x 9/16", 10 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1891;
described on pages 85-87, 120-121 of the 1893 Hoffmann book;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 121 shapes to make;
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle)

--- 251 ---
Circular Puzzle, Continued


Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.6" x 3.6" x 9/16", 10 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet starts with 8 pages of multi-language text,
followed by 48 pages of the same 121 shapes as the puzzle on the first page;
this box top was made with a number of variations a b of the text for different markets)

--- 252 ---
Circular Puzzle, Continued



Richter Co., circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.7" x 3.7" x 9/16", 10 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
box bottom lists other puzzles for sale,
booklet has 48 pages of the same 121 shapes as the puzzle on the first page,
along with the single loose double sided page of English directions shown above)

--- 253 ---
Cross Puzzle



a.k.a. Sherlock Holmes, Hi Ho, Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 10
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3" x 3.75" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and two booklets;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1892;
described on page 83-85, 118-119 of the Hoffmann book;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the inside of the bottom has a testimonial dated 1899,
variations of this testimonial appear in the box top or bottom other versions;
first booklet has multi-language text inside covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 149 shapes to make
the first of which is the cross as shown above,
and where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
the second booklet gives a solution for each shape)

--- 254 ---
Cross Puzzle, Continued


Same dimensions as version on the first page;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has nothing on the inside covers,
with 8 unnumbered pages of multi-language text,
followed by the same 48 pages of problems as the version on the first page;
the first page credits Dr. Richter's Publishing House, 215 Pearl St., NY;
second booklet is the same solution booklet as the one on the first page.

--- 255 ---
Cross Puzzle, Continued


Same dimensions as version on the first page;
box construction uses a lip on the bottom;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
inside of the bottom has a testimonial dated 1890;
inside covers and first 8 unnumbered pages have multi-language text,
followed by 48 pages with the same problems as the version on the first page;
however, the problems are drawn with black line art rather than red coloring;
the first page of problems is shown to the right of the booklet cover above;
second booklet has solutions for problems on the first 32 pages.

Note: Version shown on the top right is Dutch version; it says "Kruisraadsel" at the bottom of the box top and on the front cover of the booklet (which has the identical pages).

--- 256 ---
Cross Puzzle, Continued


Same puzzle as the one shown on the first page;
3" x 3.7" x 1/2";
booklet has the same 48 shapes to make,
but without the text pages at the front and back.

--- 257 ---
Not Too Hasty


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 11
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3.1" x 3.1" x 5/8", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1894;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has 8 pages of multi-language text at the beginning,
and 32 pages with 89 shapes to make)

--- 258 ---
Not Too Hasty, Continued


Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.1" x 3.1" x 9/16", 8 stone pieces,
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 32 pages with 89 shapes to make, same as those on the preceding page)

--- 259 ---
Not Too Hasty, Continued


Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.1" x 3.1" x 5/8", 8 stone pieces,
and booklet of 32 pages with the same 89 shapes as the preceding page)

--- 260 ---
Pythagoras


a.k.a. a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 12
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3 by 3 by 9/16 inches, 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1891;
described on pages 81-83, 117-118 of the 1893 Hoffmann book;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the box cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the inside of the box bottom has a testimonial dated 1899;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 64 pages of 197 shapes to make,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle)

--- 261 ---
The Pythagoras Booklet Shapes
Described on page L of the booklet, the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle; shapes 182 to 185 use the Anchor Puzzle, shapes 186 to 189 use the Tormentor, shapes 190 to 193 use the Circular Puzzle, and shapes 194 to 197 use the Cross Puzzle.











Note: These pages are shown in order (left to right, top to bottom), except that page 64 (pattern 197) is shown with page 1 (patterns 1 through 3).

--- 262 ---
The Other Pages of the Pythagoras Booklet
Here are the front and back cover, the inside front cover, pages A through Q that come before the problem pages, and the inside back cover. The text in German, French, and English discusses this and other puzzles, and gives testimony from a satisfied customer.






--- 263 ---
Pythagoras, Continued



Similar to the version on the first page, but
box has different construction with a lip on the bottom,
booklet has multi-language text on inside covers and 6 unnumbered pages,
and the booklet has the same problems but drawn with black and white art
(first three pages of problems shown above)

--- 264 ---
Pythagoras, Continued



Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.1 by 3.1 by 1/2 inches, 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the box cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has the same 64 pages with 197 shapes to make as the puzzle on the first page,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle,
and the extra double-sided sheet describes them)

--- 265 ---
Pythagoras, Continued


Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3 by 3 by 1/2 inches, 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the cover slides on;
the booklet is 48 pages of 181 puzzles;
these 48 pages are the same as the first 48 pages of the puzzle on the first page;
there is an extra double-sided text page in German between pages 18 and 19,
that seems to be a bit out of place because it discusses
the combinations that would be on the other 16 pages)

--- 266 ---
Tormentor


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle 13
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3 by 3 by 9/16 inches, 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1891;
described on pages 80-81 of the 1893 Hoffmann book;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the inside of the bottom has a testimonial dated 1899;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 64 pages with 174 shapes to make,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle)

--- 267 ---
The Tormentor Booklet Shapes
Described on page L of the booklet, the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle; shapes 159 to 162 use the Circular Puzzle, shapes 163 to 166 use the Anchor Puzzle, shapes 167 to 170 use the Cross Puzzle, and shapes 171 to 174 use Pythagoras.










Note: These pages are shown in order (left to right, top to bottom), except that page 64 (pattern 174) is shown with page 1 (patterns 1 through 4).

--- 268 ---
The Other Pages of the Tormentor Booklet
Here are the front and back cover, the inside front cover, pages A through Q that come before the problem pages, and the inside back cover. The text in German, French, and English discusses this and other puzzles, and gives testimony from a satisfied customer.






--- 269 ---
Tormentor, Continued

Same as the version on the first page
except for the art on the box top and the front and back of the booklet
(same box top inside, testimonial, booklet text and problems).



Similar to the version above, but
box has different construction with a lip on the bottom,
booklet has multi-language text on inside covers and 8 unnumbered pages,
and the booklet has the same problems but drawn with black and white art;
the first three pages of problems are shown above.

--- 270 ---
Tormentor, Continued


(cardboard box 3.1 by 3.1 by 1/2 inches, 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
inside of the box cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has the same 64 pages with 174 shapes as the puzzle shown on the first page,
where the two sided instruction sheet describes the puzzle)

--- 271 ---
Be Quiet


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 14 (sometimes 3)
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, late 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3" x 3+7/8" x 1/2", 10 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1899;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has 48 pages with 136 shapes to make,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
the solution to the first problem in the booklet is shown above)

Note: Although usually referred to with the number 14, some versions of the box graphics showed the number 3.

--- 272 ---
Be Quiet, Continued


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 14 /3
Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3" x 3+78" x 1/2", 10 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has 48 pages with the same 136 shapes to make as the preceding page)

--- 273 ---
Be Quiet, Continued


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 14 /3
Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3" x 3+78" x 1/2", 10 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has 48 pages with the same 136 shapes to make as the preceding pages)

--- 274 ---
Sphinx


a.k.a. Lott's Stone Puzzle, Anchor Puzzle No. 15 (sometimes 16)
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, late 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 2.7" x 4.4" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1899;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
a second way of packing the pieces into the box is shown by the figure above;
the inside of the bottom has a testimonial dated 1899;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 135 shapes to make,
the first of which is the pyramid of square root 3 times the height of the rectangle,
and where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;

Note: The box above does not show a number. However this puzzle was commonly listed by in Richter literature as number 15, and 15 appears on the boxes of some versions. It was also made with a box that has the same graphics as the one above with "No. 16." above the word Sphinx.

--- 275 ---
Sphinx, Continued



Puzzle pieces the same as the first page but box is 2.75" x 4.9" x 1/2";
booklet has the same 48 pages of problems but no additional text;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
directions are on a separate two sided sheet that is slightly smaller than booklet pages.

--- 276 ---
The Lott's Stone Puzzle Version of the Sphinx


"Lott's Stone Puzzle", copyright 1911, Lott's Bricks, LTD, Watford, England.
(cardboard box 2.7" x 4.2" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the booklet pages 1 and 2 are an introduction,
the last page invites one to write for a solution to another puzzle,
and pages 3 through 31 show 105 shapes to make,
where page 31 shows the rectangle for how to pack the pieces into the box)

--- 277 ---
Magic Egg
(same pieces but different shapes than Richter 3 Egg Of Columbus)



a.k.a. Miracle Egg, Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 16 (sometimes 17)
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.1" x 4.1" x 9/16" with wood inserts, 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1912;
booklet has 48 pages with the same 106 shapes to make
as the puzzle on the following page, but without the other pages of text)

--- 278 ---
Magic Egg, Continued


Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.1" x 4.1" x 9/16" with wood inserts, 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
also made with the similar box top but without "No. 17",
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Y at the front,
and 48 pages with the same 106 shapes to make as puzzle in preceding page;
the first page of shapes has written "Copyright Nachdruck verboten";
all shapes use only the 9 pieces of the puzzle;
the booklet names each shape in pages A to Y)

--- 279 ---
Wrath Breaker


a.k.a. Richter Anchor Puzzle No. 17
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, 1890's / early 1900's
(cardboard box 3.5" x 3.5" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1893;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside the covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 113 shapes to make,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle)

--- 280 ---
Wrath Breaker, Continued


Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.5" x 3.5" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text on eight unumbered pages at the front,
and 48 pages with the same 113 shapes to make as the puzzle on the previous page,
where the last 16 pages are shapes made in combination with another puzzle;
this Gnome theme box top was made with different variations of the text)

--- 281 ---
Wrath Breaker, Continued


Richter & Co., Germany, circa 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.5" x 3.5" x 9/16", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has the same 48 pages with 113 shapes to make
as the puzzle on the first page, but with no additional directions)

--- 282 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 23


F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.2" x 4.3" x 9/16", 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
booklet has multi-language text inside covers and on pages I to XIX at front,
where none of the text is in English,
followed by a blank page where a previous owner has drawn
a solution to the additional shape shown above,
followed by 32 pages with 97 shapes to make)

--- 283 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 26





F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2.25" x 4.25" x 1/2", 7 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has English text on the inside of the covers shown above,
and 32 pages with 99 shapes to make,
where the first is the rectangle for the box packing
and next three are the parallelogram, square, and triangle shown above)

--- 284 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 27



F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2.75" x 3.7" x 1/2", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has English text on the inside of the covers shown above,
and 32 pages with 98 shapes to make,
where the first is the rectangle for the box packing
and the second is the parallelogram shown above)

--- 285 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 28



F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2+11/16" x 4.25" x 1/2", 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has English text on the inside of the covers shown above,
and 32 pages with 96 shapes to make,
where the first is the shape for the box packing
and the second is the rectangle shown above)

--- 286 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 29



F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2.5" x 4.5" x 1/2", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has English text on the inside of the covers shown above,
and 32 pages with 96 shapes to make,
where the first is the rectangle for the box packing

--- 287 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 30



F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2.75" x 3.7" x 1/2", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has English text on the inside of the covers shown above,
and 32 pages with 98 shapes to make,
where the first is the rectangle for the box packing
and the second is the parallelogram shown above)

--- 288 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 35



F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2.75" x 3.7" x 1/2", 9 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has English text on the inside of the covers shown above,
and 32 pages with 96 shapes to make,
where the first is the rectangle for the box packing
and the second is the octagon shown above)

--- 289 ---
Richter Anchor Stone Puzzle No. 36



F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.1" x 3.75" x 1/2", 8 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1917;
similar in construction to the Anchor Puzzle Tangram;
the inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
the booklet has English text on the inside of the covers shown above,
and 32 pages with 96 shapes to make,
where the first is the rectangle for the box packing
and the second is the shape shown above;
label across front is from F. A. O. Swartz, N.Y.)

--- 290 ---
Richter Numbered Puzzles Summary
The manufacture for the Richter Anchor Puzzles began in the 1890's, where the puzzles numbered above 17 were made in the World War I era. The 1893 Hoffmann book describes the Anchor, Circular, Cross, Pythagoras, and Tormentor puzzles (and also the Star Puzzle). A history of the Richter puzzles is presented in The Anchor Puzzle Book by Jerry Slocum (see also the Slocum and Botermans books). The puzzle boxes were made with a variety of cover art (see the following page), although the stone pieces, made with the Richter Co. patented process, are the same. Perhaps what made these puzzles so popular were the fun booklets that came with them, giving a host of shapes to make.

Here is a booklet that came with the Anchor Puzzle, and also a corresponding solution booklet that one could purchase by mail:



Generally, booklets have more or less the same cover art as the box top, but not always. For example, on the left and middle are booklets for versions of the Tormentor and Cross Puzzle that look very different from the corresponding box top, and on the right is a booklet for a version of the Anchor Puzzle that has blank covers (and nothing inside besides the problem figures):



Here are two examples of additional work booklets that came with the Anchor and Lightning Conductor puzzles:


--- 291 ---
Examples of Different Richter Box Styles
Some box themes were highly regular; here are some examples (the last one in the first row is used on boxes numbered above 17, and the others for 17 and below, where the last three in the second row are dated in the The Anchor Puzzle Book as relatively late versions first made in 1922, 1925, and 1932 respectively):





Other themes used fun graphics (e.g., people thinking, specialized graphics, cartoons); here are some examples (all used on puzzles numbered 17 and below):








--- 292 ---
Richter Anchor Puzzle Shapes 1 - 17

Richter 1
"The Nine"

Richter 2
"Lightning Conductor"

Richter 3
"Egg Of Columbus"

Richter 4
"Patience Prover"

Richter 5
"Trouble Killer"

Richter 6
"Heart Puzzle"

Richter 7
"Kobold"

Richter 8
"Anchor Puzzle"

Richter 9
"Circular Puzzle"

Richter 10
"Cross Puzzle"

Richter 11
"Not Too Hasty"

Richter 12
"Pythagoras"

Richter 13
"Tormentor"

Richter 14
"Be Quiet"

Richter 15
"Sphinx"

Richter 16
"Magic Egg"

Richter 17
"Wrath Breaker"

--- 293 ---
Richter Anchor Puzzle Shapes 18-36

Richter 18
"Archimedes"

Richter 19
"Ende Gut, Alles Gut"

Richter 20
"Pass Auf"

Richter 21
"Eile mit Weile"

Richter 22
"Sorenbrecher"

Richter 23
"Kopernikus"

Richter 24
"Pyramide"

Richter 25
"Nur Mut"

Richter 26
"Bose Siben"

Richter 27
"Ritze Ratze"

Richter 28
"Frisch Gewagt"

Richter 29
"Zeitvertreiber"

Richter 30
"Zeppelin"

Richter 31
"Kiebitz-Ei"

Richter 32
"Wer Wegt Gewinnt"

Richter 33
"Fur Kluge Leute"

Richter 34
"Hexenmeister"

Richter 35
"Teufeldien"

Richter 36
"Heureka"

--- 294 ---
Shapes Shown In An Old Richter Brochure
Here are pages from an old Richter Brochure (courtesy of Jerry Slocum, Puzzles Old And New, Copyright 1986, page 28); see also The Anchor Puzzle Book by Jerry Slocum.



--- 295 ---
Shapes Used To Make The 36 Richter Anchor Puzzles
Here (and on the following page) are the shapes used to make the 36 Richter Anchor Puzzles (courtesy of Jerry Slocum, Puzzles Old And New, Copyright 1986, page 28); see also The Anchor Puzzle Book by Jerry Slocum.


--- 296 ---
Shapes Used To Make The 36 Richter Puzzles, Continued
(second half of the figure from Puzzles Old And New, Copyright 1986, page 28)


--- 297 ---
Further Reading
The Anchor Puzzle Book, from: http://www.SlocumPuzzles.com
Richter Company U.S. Brochure, from: http://www.cs.brandeis.edu/~storer/JimPuzzles/ZPAGES/zzzRichterBrochure.html
Anker Page, from: http://www.ankerstein.org
Richter History, from: http://www.ankerstein.org/html/CO.HTM
Wikipedia Tangram Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tangram
Rubiks.com Double Tangram booklet, from: http://www.rubiks.com/World/Rubiks%20downloads.aspx
Rob's Tangram Page, from: http://home.comcast.net/~stegmann/tangram.htm
Slocum Database, from: http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/search.htm?scope=lilly/slocum

--- 298 ---
Richter Piccolo Nr. T1


a.k.a. Richter Picco Nr. T1
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2.125" x 2.125" x 3/8", 8 stone pieces, and problem sheet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1913;
puzzle tray slides into the right side of the box with a small tab to pull it out;
top and bottom of box edge says "Richter Rudolstadt";
same pieces in a smaller size as Richter 13 Tormentor;
problem sheet has 26 shapes, where problem 11 shows how to pack into the box)

The first of three miniature Richter puzzles referred to as Picco or Piccolo (Nr. T2 is the same as Richter 12 Pythagoras; and Nr. T3 is the same as Richter 8 Anchor Puzzle; with the parallelogram piece divided into two triangles); see the Anchor Puzzle Book.

Further Reading
Indiana Slocum Archive (photos of Picco versions of Nr. T1 Nr. T2 a b c, Nr. T3 a b) from:
http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/search.htm?scope=lilly/slocum

--- 299 ---
Richter - London Hamleys Toy Store


a.k.a. Richter Hamleys
F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 2.125" x 2.125" x 3/8", 8 stone pieces, and problem sheet;
puzzle tray slides into the right side of the box with a small table to pull it out;
same pieces in a smaller size as Richter 13 Tormentor;
same size and pieces as Richter Piccolo Nr. T1, and like that puzzle,
problem sheet has the same 26 shapes, where problem 11 shows how to pack into the box)

Further Reading
Modern page of the London Hamleys toy store: from: http://www.hamleys.com/explore-stores.irs

--- 300 ---
Richter Trench and Zoo Puzzles

"Schutzengraben-Geduldspeil"


"Zoologischer-Garten"

Richter Company, Germany, early 1900's.
(both puzzles cardboard box 3.1" x 3.1" x 1/2", 15 stone pieces, and problem sheet)

These two puzzles are the same except for the included direction sheet. The Anchor Puzzle Book describes the 1915 Trench Puzzle as made for World War I soldiers, and the 1916 Zoo Puzzle as a "neutral" puzzle made in Switzerland.

--- 301 ---
Trench Puzzle Problem Sheet

--- 302 ---
Trench Puzzle Problem Sheet

--- 303 ---
Richter Star Puzzle



Richter Company, Germany, 1890's / early 1900's.
(cardboard box 3.75" x 3.75" x 1/2", 48 stone pieces, and booklet;
the Anchor Puzzle Book dates this puzzle as first made in 1892;
described on pages 87-90, 122-124 of the 1893 Hoffmann Book;
16 white right triangles, 8 white wedges, 8 black wedges, 16 black quadralaterals;
inside of the cover shows how to pack the pieces into the box;
inside of the box bottom has an add for "Dr. Richter's Pain-Expeller";
booklet has multi-language text inside covers and on pages A to Q at the front,
and 48 pages with 153 shapes to make)

Like Blumenspiel (using curved pieces) and Meteor One (using marbles), more of a two-dimensional building set than a puzzle.


--- 304 ---
Star Puzzle Booklet Pages








--- 305 ---
Star Puzzle, Continued


Different box and booklet cover art from the puzzle of the preceding page,
but otherwise the same;
this puzzle has had 3 of the 4 sides of the box lid replaced,
4 missing white pieces replaced with pieces made from painted maple,
and three missing black pieces replaced with pieces made from Ebony)

--- 306 ---
Richter Puzzle Mosaic No. 3


Richter Company, Germany, circa 1915.
(cardboard box 8.8" x 8.8" x 5/8", 52 colored stone pieces, 6.75" x 6.75",
with 12 page blue problem and green solution booklets of 36 patterns)

More of a two-dimensional building set than a puzzle. Described on page 86 of the Anchor Puzzle Book, this is one of a number of Richter "Mosiac" puzzles made in the World War I time period that used colored tiles. The tiles are colored differently on each side; below is shown the arrangement shown above flipped over (in the horizontal direction), and two sample pages from the problem and solution booklets:




--- 307 ---
Richter Meteor 1

F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(cardboard box 6.3 by 6.3 by 5/7 inches, 4 colors marbles, and booklet;
more of a game than a puzzle, the object is to arrange the marbles into patterns;
in Richter's Puzzles and Pastimes catalog - see Anchor Puzzle references)




--- 308 ---
Richter Meteor 6


F. Ad. Richter & Co., Germany, early 1900's.
(wood box 8.75" x 8.75" x 2.5", 6 colors marbles, and booklet;
like Meteor 1, arrange the marbles into patterns;
also includes a Nine Mens Morris, board;
in Richter's Puzzles and Pastimes catalog - see Anchor Puzzle references)

--- 309 ---
The Classic Tangram

a.k.a. Richter Anchor Puzzle
Wood puzzle purchased circa 2000; sleeve made by J. A Storer.
(wood tray and pieces with cardboard sleeve, 5+78" square by 3/8" thick)

The sleeve has the problems from the classic Richter Anchor puzzle:


--- 310 ---
Daddling

"Wm. F. Drueke & Sons, Grand Rapids, Mich.", circa 1940?
(cardboard box 2.5 by 5.75 by 13/16 inch thick, and 7 wood pieces;
assembles to a 4.1 inch square by 5/16 inches thick)

--- 311 ---
Pythagoras

Tryne Games Mfg. Inc., Lindenhurst, NY, copyright 1961.
(cardboard box 5.6 by 9 by 7/8 inch thick, booklet, and 7 plastic pieces;
assembles to a 5.4 inch square by 3/16 inches thick;
the problems in the booklet are similar to the Richter 8 Anchor Puzzle booklet; this puzzle should not be confused with Richter 12 Pythagoras)

--- 312 ---
Voodoo
(Same pieces as Richter No. 10 Cross Puzzle)


Kogner Bros. Inc., Tryne Game Division, East Paterson, N.J., circa 1960's.
(cardboard box 5.6" x 9" x 13/16" with plastic tray, booklet, and 7 plastic pieces;
assembles to a 5.4 inch square by 3/16 inches thick;
the problems in the booklet are similar to the Richter 10 Cross Puzzle booklet;
the box and booklet are not dated,
but the booklet references a copyright 1961 version of the Tangram that it calls "Pythagoras")

--- 313 ---
HiHo
(Same pieces as Richter No. 10 Cross Puzzle)


Hi Ho Puzzle, 1932.
(2.75 by 2.5 by 5/8 inch cardboard box, 7 plastic pieces, and directions)

The pieces are made from Bakelite (an old type of plastic developed in the early 1900's). Below are the top and bottom edges of the box and one of the sides (the other side is the same). The directions show a sitting dog and suggest that many other patterns can be made.





Further Reading
Wilipedia Bakelite Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakelite

--- 314 ---
Sherlock Holmes
(Same pieces as Richter No. 10 Cross Puzzle)




Sherlock Holmes Puzzle, circa 1960.
(2.9" x 3.6" x 7/16" plastic box, 7 plastic pieces, and directions;
the next page shows another copy still glued to the original 8.2" x 6.25" card)

--- 315 ---
The Sherlock Holmes Puzzle Card

--- 316 ---
Scrambled Egg
(Same pieces as Richter No. 3 and Richter No. 16)



Scrambled Egg, Copyright ThinkFun 2002.
(9 metal pieces in plastic tray, 4 by 3.5 by 5/16 inches;
puzzle comes with clear plastic sleeve for storage;
booklet slides into tray bottom, and presents problems with solutions shown above)

--- 317 ---
121 Puzzles



Carrom Co., Ludington, Michigan, circa 1920s?
(cardboard box and 7 wood pieces, 3.6 inches square by 9/16 inches thick)

Like the Anchor Puzzle Tangram, the directions that were sold with this puzzle give a host of patterns to make from seven pieces similar to those of the Tangram.

--- 318 ---
ELZZUP


ELZZUP Puzzle Co., Keene, N.H., circa 1900.
(3.3" x 3.3" x 3/4" wood box and 10 wood pieces)

This puzzle was sold in 2011 by a person who said it had been owned by Eleanor Dows of Laurel Mass., the sister of his grandfather, who was born in 1890. The back of the box top has her name in pencil, and her name and the town of Laurel Mass. is burned into the box bottom. The arrangment of the pieces into a square is not unique. In the spirit of the Anchor Puzzle Tangram, the goal is to make fun patterns with the pieces.

--- 319 ---
The Drueke Version Of ElZZUP



Wm. F. Drueke & Sons, Grand Rapids, MI, circa 1940's - 1960's.
(top: cardboard box 3.2"x3.2"x1/2", problem booklet, and 10 wood pieces;
middle: plastic box 8"x8"x1.2", problem & solution booklets, 10 wood pieces;
bottom: cardboard box 7.5"x7.5"x3/4", problem & solution booklets, 10 wood pieces)

In the same theme as the Anchor Puzzle Tangram, all three of these versions present 57 pages of 200 shapes to make. The first version above has only a problem booklet, which also includes English, French, and Spanish pages at the beginning that indicate that the puzzle may be purchased by mail for 50 cents, and that a solution booklet can be ordered for 25 cents; the back of this booklet shows how to pack the pieces into the box.

--- 320 ---
Drueke ELZZUP Shapes

--- 321 ---
Drueke ELZZUP Problem Pages
(from the 8x8" version)









--- 322 ---
Drueke ELZZUP Solution Pages
(from the 8x8" version)









--- 323 ---
PIC-TUR-ETT


PIC-TUR-ETT Company, Mattapan, Massachusetts;
"PATENT APPLIED FOR"; all figures on directions and cards are copyright 1933.

(cardboard box, direction sheet, 15 problem ad solution cards, 4.25" x 4.25" x 1"))

--- 324 ---
PIC-TUR-ETT Problem and Solution Cards


--- 325 ---
King Tut's Puzzle


Rockford Pattern Works, circa 1930's?
(4.25" square by 5/8" thick box, 9 wood pieces, and 4" square booklet;
some versions have the Rinehimer Millwork label on the box top)

Like the Anchor Puzzle Tangram, a booklet shows shapes to make. Here are the booklet pages (page 1 and the last page are shown together):






Further Reading
King Tut Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_tut
Rockford Foundries History, from: www.rockfordfoundries.com/about.cfm

--- 326 ---
HIQU

German text on the package promotes Vision 2000; purchased 2010.
(cardboard box and four 7/16" thick wood pieces, 9.25" x 1.8" by 9/16")

In the theme of the Anchor Puzzle Tangram, using the same four pieces as the Missing T puzzle, the booklet gives 100 shapes to make, the first how to pack into the box and the last is the T:










Further Reading
Vision 2000 Page, from: http://www.vision2020.org/main.cfm

--- 327 ---
Shape By Shape


Copyright ThinkFun 2008.
(plastic, 5" x 5" x 1.4")

In the theme of the Anchor Puzzle Tangram, 14 pieces can be arranged into many shapes. The box has a tray that slides out with 60 problem cards of shapes to make (that give hints and solutions on the back).

Further Reading
Problem card backs.

--- 328 ---
Four Piece Square

Magic Square, circa 1960?
(plastic box 2.5 by 1.75 by 1/2 inches and 4 plastic pieces;
assembles to a 2.5 inch square)

--- 329 ---
Double Square

a.k.a. Square Me, Five Block Puzzle, Madagascar Madness
ThinkFun Binary Arts, 2003.
(plastic, 4-piece square is 3 inches, solved 5-piece square is 3.2 inches square)

People often quickly find the four piece solution and then get stuck trying "stretch" the puzzle just a little bit in a way that will accommodate an additional small square piece. If the four piece solution is 4 units square, it has area 16, the extra square has area 2, and the five piece solution has area 18 (forming a square that is just under 4.25 units square); for each of the pieces in the four piece solution, its orientation is 45 degrees counter-clockwise in the five piece solution:



Characterized on page 102 of the 1942 Filipiak book Filipiak book as "recorded in the records of antiquity", has been periodically made as a promotional item.


CSPI promotional circa 1975.
(plastic, solved 5-piece 2.9 inches square;
this was a company that J. A. Storer's father was a part of in the 1970's;
came with a wire loop which J. A. Storer replaced in 2007 with Snowbird key ring)

--- 330 ---
Other Versions of Double Square

"Madagascar Madness", Behavioral Sciences Inc., 1969.
(5 inches square by 3/4 inch thick plastic box and five plastic pieces;
the square piece was lost and replaced with a green plexi-glass piece)

This puzzle is packaged with a tray for the 4-piece solution and the 5th piece loose; perhaps to guide the solvers thinking away from the 5-piece solution. The directions on a 4.5 inch square card inserted into the back give an interesting discussion of the geometry:


--- 331 ---
Other Versions of Double Square Continued

Dickinson's Witch Hazel promotional, unknown age.
(3" x 4.5" envelope with cardboard pieces, solved 5-piece square is 4" square;
Dickinson's Witch Hazel was first made in 1866 and was still being made in 2000)


Five Block Puzzle, S.S. Adams Co. circa 1950?
(1/4 inch thick wood pieces, solved 5-piece square is 5 inches square)
Further reading
Dickinson's Witch hazel Page, from: http://www.witchhazel.com
Dickinson Co. Records, from:
http://www.lib.uconn.edu/online/research/speclib/ASC/findaids/
EEDickinson/MSS19960001.html

--- 332 ---
Missing T

a.k.a. T Puzzle, Magic T, Cut-Up T, Pa's T Puzzle,
Great American T Puzzle, White Rose Ceylon Perfect T Puzzle, Lash Bitters T Puzzle.

Old design, copyright 1898 Lash Inc., this copyright ThinkFun Binary Arts 2003.
(plastic, 4 pieces, 3.1" high by 3" wide when solved)

The four pieces can be positioned to form a T as shown above. The HIQU puzzle has a booklet of problems based on these pieces. This is an old puzzle that has been produced many times; here is a nice antique wood one:


Pa's T Puzzle, circa 1940's.
(cardboard box 4.6 by 1.75 by 11/16 inches and 4 walnut pieces,
5" high by 4.75" wide when solved;
box edge says "PA'S T PUZZLE No. P 20 WM. F. DRUEKE & SONS Grand Rapide, Mich.")

--- 333 ---
Adams Version Of The T Puzzle With Solution


S. S. Adams Co., circa 1950's.
(3.5" cardboard sleeve with cardboard directions and dark green plastic pieces)

--- 334 ---
Example Of Inexpensive T Puzzles Sold Circa 1960's

Magic T Puzzle, unknown manufacture.
(plastic box 2.5 by 1.75 by 1/2 inches and 4 plastic pieces)


Marx Toys, circa 1960's.
(5.5 by 7 inch cardboard card with plastic pieces;
solution sheet in plastic bag and big question mark with company logo behind the bag)


Further Reading
T Puzzle Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_puzzle

--- 335 ---
What's Your Score


"Shackman N.Y.1 No. 3627 Cross Puzzle", made in Japan, circa 1960's?
(cardboard box 5+1/8" x 1.75" x 5/8", direction sheet, and six 1/8" thick wood pieces
consisting of four identical Z shapes and two identical L shapes;
assembled cross is 4+3/8" high by 3 inches wide at the cross, and 1" wide at the tips.)

--- 336 ---
F Puzzle - "theF"


Hikimi Nob Yoshigahara Puzzle Collection, Japan, Copyright 1987.
(box and 6 wood pieces, 3.7" x 6.1" x 3/4";
included are directions in Japanese that give the problems shown above)

--- 337 ---
H Puzzle

Designed by T. Linden, made by E. Fuller, 2009.
(velour bag and 7 English Brown Oak pieces, 3 inches assembled)

There are two 1x1x3 unit pieces each with one 45 degree pointed tip, three 1x1x2 unit pieces each with one 45 degree pointed tip, and two unit triangles.

   

By cheating just a little bit, an upper case H can also be formed. On the left below the upper right tip of the H is missing a unit triangle. In the middle, the pieces have all been rotated 90 degrees and are arranged so that the H looks perfect from above (it is formed from two 3 unit pieces on the left, two triangles for the cross, and three 2 unit pieces on the right, where there is a missing triangle on the top right tip when viewed from the side). On right below, again the pieces have all been rotated 90 degrees and are arranged so that the H looks perfect from above (it is formed from a 2 and 3 unit piece on each side, a 2 unit piece and a triangle for the cross, and the remaining triangle filling in one of the tips, with the other three tips having a missing unit triangle when viewed from the side).

       

--- 338 ---
Pie Without E



Promotional puzzle from Mr. Puzzle Australia, 2008.
(6 thin flexible plastic pieces)

--- 339 ---
Make A Square


Made by interlocking Puzzles 2000.
(directions card and 6 identical Zebrawood pieces, each 2.25 inches)

Here is what Interlocking Puzzles said:
"There are at least eighteen different challenges requiring the special angles and three, four, five, or six pieces of our Make a Square puzzle. Geometric shapes possible include triangles, squares, rectangles, pentagons, hexagons, parallelograms, and trapezoids. This tiling puzzle seems simple, but it is quite challenging to find all the solutions. These 6 pieces are each over 2 inches long, which allows the largest finished shape to be over 7 inches across the diagonal."

--- 340 ---
Major War Problem


Copyright B. L. Frye, St. Louis, MO, 1943.
(5 identical shaped large cardboard pieces and 5 identical shaped smaller cardboard pieces,
in a cardboard envelope 3+5/8" x 3+7/8", with directions on the inside)

--- 341 ---
Checking In


Designed and mad by Stewart Coffin, 2013
(maple and paduk on a plywood bottom, 3.7 x 3.7 x 3/4", signed on the bottom;
one of 4 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in 2014)

Shown on page 155 of the Coffin AP-ART book. This puzzle is already a challenge due to the number of pieces and that they are two sided. Also, when it is given to someone with the pieces out of the box, there is a natural tendency to put them in so that they fit tight into the corners, in which case one inevitably ends up with having two pieces left that will not fit into the final corner. It is only after noticing that although the pieces are precisely cut, space is left between the packing and sides of the frame, and so something seems wrong (in fact, that space is equal to the space in the corners when the puzzle is correctly solved).

--- 342 ---
Decoy Puzzle


Designed by Stewart Coffin, made by Eric Fuller 2013.
(Ebony, Canarywood, Sapele, acrylic plastic top, 3.75" x 3.75" x 7/8";
6 puzzle pieces with the shapes shown above)

The plastic top has some rectilinear openings through which the pieces can be inserted and manipulated. Remove the pieces, mix them up, and then re-insert them. The underside has a rim that allows one to play with piece assembly without the plastic on top. Here is what the puzzle maker says:
"I've constructed this with a solid Sapele body, shouldered on the corners for strength. The acrylic top is precision cut on the laser and the bottom is a solid floating canarywood panel chosen for contrast against the dark ebony. The fit is precise, with rounded corners to enable the very tricky rotational solution."
The puzzle maker also quotes from the designer:
"The three puzzles in this category all have a 5x5 square two-sided tray. On the back side is a simple framed square for practice exercises. The front side has a Plexiglas cover with openings cut in it through which the puzzle pieces are inserted. Of these three, The Decoy (#187-A) is by far the most difficult and my favorite. It is the only one that requires a slightly loose tray or rounding of corners to solve."

--- 343 ---
Batee Baseball

Plas-Trix Co., Jamica, NY, circa late 1950's
(plastic box and 12 plastic pieces, 4.75 by 4 by 5/16 inches)

Made by the same company and packaged like the Krazee Checkerboard Puzzle and the Krazee Links, but easier. Here are the packing instructions on the back of the directions and a solution:


--- 344 ---
Blockade

Purchased 2004.
(wood base with metal pins, 7 wood pieces, 5 inches)

A board with metal pins must have 7 wood pieces (with holes) placed on it to form a square. The solution is not unique.

--- 345 ---
Four T Puzzle


Copyright ThinkFun 2008.
(plastic, 3 inches)

Pack the four T's into the square. On the left above is the top side of the puzzle solved, and on the right above is the easier underside of the puzzle (with a larger square) solved.

--- 346 ---
Pencil Puzzle

Designed by E. Nagata, copyright Binary Arts 2002.
(plastic and metal, 3.5 by 4.5 by 3/8 inches thick)

The puzzle comes with the pencils placed on one side of the board as shown above. The challenge is to flip the board over and pack them into the other side:

--- 347 ---
Pearl In The Shell

Designed by Bill Cutler, made by Walt Hoppe, and purchased 2006.
(15 pieces including the pearl and shell, 4.5 inches)

The goal is to place the thirteen wedge shaped pieces and the pearl (the little round piece) into the shell. After achieving the configuration shown above, the pearl is off to the right in the keeper hole, the pieces meet at a point in the center, and there appears to be no extra space. Now for the fun; the pieces can all be flipped over and space made to place the pearl in the center of the shell:


--- 348 ---
Czech Farms

Designed by Bill Cutler and made by Walt and Chris Hoppe, 2008.
(25 wood pieces, each 3/16 inch thick, solved puzzle is 6.5 inch diameter circle)

Pack the 25 pieces to form a circle; here is what the directions say:
"These pieces can be used to tile the plane non-periodically. They are a variation of the Penrose "Kites and Darts" tiles. Each barn is equivalent to the Penrose "Dart" piece, and the silos and tractors are each one-half of a "Kite" piece."
The graphics on the 25 pieces are:
(5) barn with a silo
(5) barn with a double silo
(5) barn (no silo) with a tractor
(5) barn (no silo) with a tractor towing a cart
(3) barn with a double silo and tractor
(2) barn with a silo and tractor towing a cart

Note: The directions say that some puzzles were made with the quanties 3 and 2 reversed.
Further Reading
Wikipedia Penrose Tiling Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penrose_tiling

--- 349 ---
Seven

Designed by Minoru Abe, purchased 2014.
(cardboard box, wood tray, and seven wood pieces)

Find all 7 ways to pack the 7 pieces, each consisting of 6 unit squares, into the tray that is 5 units high by 9 units wide with 3 units blocked out in the upper left corner; one is shown above, and here are the six others:






--- 350 ---
Pentominoes

a.k.a. Polyominoes
Old puzzle, this one made by Yasumi, 1995.
(wood, box and 12 pieces based on 0.75" inch cubes)

The 12 distinct shapes formed from 5 connected squares are the pentominoes (called polyominoes by Solomon W. Golomb, Charles Scribner's Sons, NY, 1965):



Total area is 60, and sizes 6 x 10, 5 x 12, 4 x 15, and 3 x 20 can be formed. There are known to be 2,339 distinct ways to form a 6 x 10 rectangle, excluding rotations and reflections. In contrast, there are 1,010 solutions for 5x12, 368 solutions for 4x15, and 3 x 20 has a unique solution except for rotating a central portion by 180 degrees.

A piece is landlocked if it does not touch one of the borders of the rectangle. Eric Harshbarger has determined that there are no 6x10 rectangle solutions with 5 or more landlocked pieces, but there can be solutions with 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 landlocked pieces (e.g., there are 207 solutions of the 6x10 rectangle with four landlocked pieces, 1,111 with three, 864 with 2, 155 with one, and only a couple with zero).

R. M. Robinson of the University of California at Berkeley proposed the "triplication problem": Given a pentomino, use 9 of the other pentominoes to construct a scale model, 3 times as wide and 3 times as high as the given piece (all 12 are possible).

Pentominoes are traditionally flat pieces that can be arranged to form 2-dimensional patterns. However, if the pieces are made to be 1-unit thick, then fun 3-dimensional patterns can also be made, including a 3 x 4 x 5 solid, and stairs that are 6 wide by 4 deep by 4 high.

--- 351 ---
Some Other Pentominoes 6x10 Solutions




--- 352 ---
Example Pentomino Solutions That Are Not 6x10
(The shaded area of the 3x20 solution may be rotated by 180 degrees.)


--- 353 ---
Some Pentomino 3x4x5 Solutions
From the directions sold with the Yasumi version:


From the directions sold with the Interlocking Puzzles version:

--- 354 ---
Pentomino Checkerbox:

Made By B. Cutler, 1989.
(3.25"x4"x2.375" plastic box and 12 two-color wood pieces with 3/4" cubes)

Can be used like any other pentominoes set. In addition, it is made from light and dark woods so that it can be solved in a 3x4x5 box where colors have a checkerboard pattern on all sides. Here is the diagram of the pieces from the directions that came with the puzzle:



Sold with this puzzle was printout of a number of solutions. Here is the one suggested; the pieces have the names 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, and this figure shows the three planes of the checkerbox:
ABB5C A666C A636C
BB555 A7778 3333C
B9958 A9778 9944C
11111 22228 44428

--- 355 ---
Pentomino Rectangular Shapes With Holes



--- 356 ---
Other Fun Pentominoes Shapes
From the directions sold with the Yasumi version:


Shown on Nivasch's Page:

--- 357 ---
Further Reading
Harshbarger's Page, from: http://www.ericharshbarger.org/pentominoes
Mathworld Page, from: http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Pentomino.html
CIMT Page, from: http://www.cimt.plymouth.ac.uk/resources/puzzles/pentoes/pentoint.htm
Gerard's Page, from: http://www.xs4all.nl/~gp/pentomino.html
Huttlin's Page, from: http://members.aol.com/huttlin/pentominoes.html
Nivasch's Page, from: http://yucs.org/~gnivasch/pentomino
Mark's Page, from: http://mathsevangelist.wordpress.com/2012/08/24/packing-pentominoes
Jankok's Page, from: http://homepages.cwi.nl/~jankok/etc/Polyomino.html
info Page, from: http://www.theory.csc.uvic.ca/~cos/inf/misc/PentInfo.html
Gottfriedville Page, from: http://www.gottfriedville.net/puzzles/colorgame/solutions.htm
Belgium Pentominoe page, from: http://home.scarlet.be/~demeod/indexe.html
Puzzle Will Be Played page, from: http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~rh5k-isn/Puzzle
Fletcher's Page, from: http://www.andrews.edu/~calkins/math/pentos.htm
Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentomino
Negahban Design Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 385,311


Further reading about some related puzzles:
Lester Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,290,761
Wadsworth Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 3,964,749
Sarkar Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 5,544,882

--- 358 ---
Twin Box Pentominoes

Designed by P. F. Ramos 2004, made by Interlocking Puzzles.
(wood frame and 12 pieces, 3.75" x 3.75" x 3" inches)

Standard pentominoes are the 12 different planar shapes that can be formed from 5 squares. There are 17 non-planar pentomino shapes (each made from 5 cubes). Here, 12 of them (which can be can be grouped into 6 mirror image pairs) must be packed into a 4x5x5 box frame; 40 units are used by the frame, leaving exactly 60 units of space to pack these pieces:

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L
According to the sheet that came with the puzzle there are 54,189 possible ways these pieces can fit (in the sense that you could build the box around them), of which 23,549 of them can be achieved by starting with the box frame and inserting and moving pieces. Here is the layer by layer representation of the solution that came with the puzzle (X is the box):
top layer:
XXXXX
XJAFX
XJJFX
XCCFX
XXXXX
2nd layer:
XGAIX
GGAFF
GJAAK
HJCDK
XDDDX
3rd layer:
XGBIX
BBBII
EEELL
HHCKK
XDCKX
bottom layer:
XXXXX
XBEIX
XHELX
XHLLX
XXXXX
In the orientations shown in the figures above, pieces can be inserted as follows:
1. B from behind.
2. I from behind.
3. G from behind.
4. E from below.
5. H from below.
6. A from behind.
7. L from the right.
8. K from the front.
9. F from behind.
10. C from above.
11. J from the top.
12. D from the front.

--- 359 ---
Block Head


a.k.a. Sneaky Squares, Stark Raving Cubes, Block Out, Square Fit, KUBI
Designed by Bill Cutler, wood version made by J. Devost, 1983.
(left: oak, 4.5 inches square by 2.25 inches high;
middle: Sneaky Squares / Start Raving Cubes, plastic, 4.5" square by 2" high;
right: Block Out / Square Fit, 3" square by 1.25" high)

Four pieces cut at odd angles (so that they not quite cubes) must be placed into the box (a three piece version has also been made). Inserting one at a time will not work. To solve, arrange them on the table so that the top is level and square, push them together at the bottoms, and drop them into the box. Here is what the pieces look like in their solved positions, outside the box:


--- 360 ---
Three Piece Block Head

a.k.a. The Third Degree
Designed by Bill Cutler, made by W. Hoppe, 1995.
(wood, 3.75 inches by 1.75 inches high)

Three pieces that are cut at odd angles (so that they not quite the same) must be placed into the box. Like the larger Block Head puzzle, putting them in one at a time will not work; to solve, first arrange them on the table so that the top surface is level and a hexagon, and then push them together at the bottoms and drop them into the box. Here is what the pieces look like in their solved positions, outside the box:


--- 361 ---
Coffin's 271A

Designed and made by Stewart Coffin, 2014.
(maple pieces and sides on plywood base, signed on the bottom;
2.25" high, top edges of walls are 2", balls are 3/4" diameter;
one of 4 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in 2014)

Unpacking requires moving the top two pieces out of the way and removing the bottom one first:



--- 362 ---
Log Stacker

Elverson Puzzle, 2002.
(wood box and 13 wood rods, 2.75 by 7.5 by 1.75 inches)

Pack 13 wood rods into the box. Here are th directions on the bottom of the box:


Here is the solved top layer taken out, showing the solved bottom layer in the box:

--- 363 ---
Dice Packing Box

Made in the U.K., circa 2000?
(wood box and 18 wood rods, 2.7" square, with recessed silver dot stickers)

Pack the 18 rods into the box. A solution of 6 layers going from top to bottom is shown here from upper left to lower right (note that the rods of the top layer shown in the upper left all need to be rotated 180 degrees, as does the first rod in the second layer):


--- 364 ---
Chaotic Cube

Copyright Pacific Game Company Inc., Japan, 1970.
(plastic, 3.25" square)

The object is to pull out all the pegs, mix them up, and reassemble. The instruction booklet shown on the following pages says there are 12 ways to do it, shows how to do two of them, and gives blank diagrams to color in the other ten solutions. Here is the solved cube shown above flipped over to show the other three sides:


--- 365 ---
Chaotic Cube Booklet Pages



--- 366 ---
Chaotic Cube Booklet Pages Continued



--- 367 ---
Pack It In

Designed by John Conway, copyright ThinkFun Binary Arts 2003.
(plastic, box and 9 pieces, 1.75" solved)

Also known as Conway's Curious Cube, and described on pages 736-737 of the Winning Ways books. Three unit cubes and six 1x2x2 pieces must be placed in a 3x3x3 box. In the unique solution, the three unit cubes line up diagionally through the cube from a corner to the center to the opposite corner:



Here is the solution that was sold with the puzzle:


--- 368 ---
Cube Root Blocks


"BRADLEY'S, CUBE ROOT BLOCKS, No. 2, TO TWO PLACES", circa 1940?
(wood box and 15 pieces, 3.25" square;
pieces based on 1/2 unit cubes;
two unit size cubes, one 3x3x3 cube, and three each of 1x1x3, 1x1x4, 1x3x3, 1x4x4)

--- 369 ---
Parcel Post

Designer unknown, made by and computer analysis done by Bill Cutler 1979.
(wood box and 18 wood pieces, 4.8" by 6.8" by 1.7" thick)

A box of inside dimensions 18 x 28 x 6 units into which must be placed 18 two unit thick pieces of sizes 4x9, (2) 5x9, 5x18, 5x21, 6x7, 6x10, 6x13, (2) 7x8, (2) 7x13, 7x18, 8x18, 9x11, 9x13, 10x11, and 11x11. Cutler's analysis showed four solutions (not counting rotations and reflections), all placing the 4x9, 6x7, and 6x13 pieces on end. Here is one of them, from the sheets that came with the puzzle (copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler).

top layer
middle layer
bottom layer

Exchanging the middle and bottom layers gives a second solution, and these two solutions each have an alternate version by exchanging the 7x18, 5x21, 6x10 pieces on the top layer with the 7x13, 5x18, 10x11 pieces on the middle layer.

--- 370 ---
Bermuda Hexagon


Designed by Bill Cutler with a computer 1992, made by Tom Lensch 2004.
(Wenge box with Bubinga pieces, 5 inches)

Here are the layers of the unique solution, from the sheet that was sold with the puzzle (copyright by and courtesy of Bill Cutler):


--- 371 ---
Matching

A host of puzzles have been made that require the solver to match adjacent edges or faces based on colors or patterns. Perhaps the most famous example of this type of puzzle is Instant Insanity, where one must line up four colored cubes so that each side has all four colors.

--- 372 ---
Rubik's Tangle 3x3

a.k.a. Rubik's Mini Tangle
Circa 1990, this one by J. A. Storer 2007 from a Rubik's Tangle 5x5.
(nine 2" cardboard squares in a 2.75 by 4 by 3/4 inch plastic box)

Arrange 9 squares in a 3x3 array so that edges match. Each square has the same pattern of 4 tangled ropes that has two connections on each edge. Different squares have a different combination of the four colors (red, green, blue, and yellow).

Jaap's Page indicates that this puzzle may have been produced as a give-away to promote the Rubik's Tangle 5x5 puzzle. The puzzle pictured here was made by using squares from a Rubik's Tangle 5x5. It's solution is the upper left 3x3 portion of the first solution to Version 1:



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles
Thurston Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 487,798
Rankin Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 606,338

--- 373 ---
Rubik's Tangle 3x3 Double Sided

Produced in 1995.
(nine 2" square plastic pieces, patterns on both sides)

Arrange 9 squares in a 3x3 array so that edges match. Each square has on both sides the same pattern of 4 tangled ropes that has two connections on each edge. Different sides of different squares have a different combination of the four colors (red, green, blue, and yellow). More confusing than Rubik's Tangle 3x3 because one has to decide how to flip the pieces.

Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/tangle.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/r90/tangle.htm
Thurston Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 487,798

--- 374 ---
Rubik's Tangle 5x5, Version 1, 2, 3, and 4

Rubik's Tangle 1, 2, 3, and 4, Matchbox 1990.
(Box and twenty seven 2 inch cardboard squares.)

Arrange 25 squares in a 5x5 array so that edges match. Each square has the same pattern of 4 tangled ropes that has two connections on each edge. There is one square for each of the 24 possible combinations of the 4 colors (red, green, blue, and yellow), and one duplicate square. The only difference between Rubik's Tangle 5x5 Versions 1, 2, 3, and 4 is which piece is duplicated. By taking three pieces from a spare set, a single set of 28 squares can be made where three of the duplicates are left out to make one of the 4 puzzles. Below is a set made by starting with a Version 3 and adding three squares taken from a Version 2; the four duplicate squares have been labeled with a number on the back.





Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/tangle.htm
Thurston Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 487,798
Rankin Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 606,338

--- 375 ---
Cluzzelei


"Made in West Germany" by Haba.
(3.75" x 3.75" x 1.8" cardboard box with nine wood pieces, each 1.75" x 1.75" x 7/16")

If the solution shown is rotated 135 degrees clockwise then it corresponds to the figure on the cover by mapping the four characters to the colors of the puzzle (in fact, by looking carefully, one can see a resemblance between the characters and the actual colored figures of the puzzle).

--- 376 ---
Crazy Puzzles


Price, Stern, Sloan Inc., Los Angeles, CA; Pig and Frog 1989, Train 1991.
(3.25 by 5.4 by 5/8 inch cardboard box and nine 3 inch cardboard pieces)

Like Rubik's Tangle 3x3, the directions on the back ask you to arrange the nine squares in a 3 by 3 array so that adjacent edges match; the Crazy Train directions state that there are exactly two solutions and are written in both English and Spanish.

--- 377 ---
McDonald Land Guzzle



Copyright 1997 McDonalds, GamesCo.
(cardboard box containing nine 5" square cardboard pieces)

--- 378 ---
Other McDonald Land Guzzle Puzzles

McDonald Land Guzzle - "Birdie"


McDonald Land Guzzle - "Grimace"


McDonald Land Guzzle - "Bus"

--- 379 ---
Infants' Hospital Puzzle


a.k.a. Infants' Hospital - The Magic Line
Chad Valley Co. Ltd., Harborne, England, 1920;
made for the Infants Hospital in Vincent Square, London, founded by R. Mond.

(cardboard box and 16 cardboard pieces, 7" x 6.25" x 1/2";
instructions on the underside of the box top;
based on a 6x6 grid with four 1x3 pieces, and 12 1x2 pieces;
see also Infants' Hospital Puzzle, Dad's Puzzler - Exchange Version / Infants Hospital, A Ward In The Infants' Hospital, Infants' Hospital Jigsaw Puzzle)

The goal is to make the line go continuously from the start position at the bottom and end at the special "HEALTH" piece. Don't view at the solution before you try it; it's harder than it looks.

--- 380 ---
Krazee Links


a.k.a. Endless Chain
Plas-Trix Co., Jamica, NY, circa 1957.
(plastic box and 14 plastic pieces, 4.75 by 4 by 5/16 inches;
same size / shape box as the Krazee Checkerboard Puzzle that is shown
on pages 57-58 of the Haubrich book, which gives the manufacture date; a puzzle like this is shown as the "Endless Chain" on page 99 of the 1893 Hoffmann book)

--- 381 ---
Lost Rope

Milton Bradley 1984.
(cardboard box and 12 plastic pieces, 7 by 5 by 1.5 inches;
"Lost Rope" is a translation of "Faden Verloren" that is written on the box.)

--- 382 ---
Drive Ya Nuts

Made by Milton Bradley, 1987.
(plastic, 5 inches)

Remove the hexagonal pieces from the pegs and then try to put them back so that the numbers on all edges match. Same puzzle as the Circus Seven puzzle,, (numbers 1 through 6 correspond to the colors red, green, blue, yellow, white, and orange). For a computer, the solution space is small: 7 choices for the center piece, 6 choices for the first outside piece, 5 choices for the second, etc., for at most 7! = 5,040 positions to try. Here are the directions that came with it:



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/circus.htm

--- 383 ---
Circus Seven

a.k.a. Mind Exerciser
Masudaya, Japan, circa 1980's?
(4.25" by 1.75" high plastic box and seven hexagonal plastic pieces)

Arrange the seven hexagons so that adjacent edges match. Like the Circus Puzzler, but a larger size puzzle with different color patterns. This is the same puzzle as Drive Ya Nuts, (the colors red, green, blue, yellow, white, and orange correspond to the numbers 1 through 6).



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/circus.htm

--- 384 ---
Circus Puzzler

a.k.a. Color Matcher
Circa 1980's?
(2.9" by 1.5" high plastic box and seven hexagonal plastic pieces)

Arrange the seven hexagons so that adjacent edges match. Like the Circus Seven puzzle, but a smaller size puzzle with different color patterns. Jaap's Page shows a number of other color variations for which this puzzle was made.

Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/circus.htm

--- 385 ---
Color Match

a.k.a. Spot Color
Made in China, purchased 2007.
(wood box and six wood circles with colored spots, 4 by 4 by 7/8 inches)

Arrange the six circles in a hexagon arrangement so that colored dots match; here is a closer view of the solution:



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/circus.htm

--- 386 ---
Thinkominos

Peter Pan Playthings, 1986.
(9.4 by 6.4 by 1 inch cardboard box, plastic base, and 6 plastic hexagons)

Jaap's Page gives two solutions, the one shown above and this one::



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/circus.htm

--- 387 ---
Match The Colors


Unknown manufacturer.
(7 cardboard hexagons, 2.25" point to point, in a 2.75" x 4" x 3/4" plastic box)

--- 388 ---
Triazzle

Purchased from Mefferts, 2007.
(plastic bag and 9 cardboard triangles, each 4 inches on a side)

This puzzle comes in a number of patterns, this is the "Dizzy Dolphins" version:


--- 389 ---
Bee

Lagoon Games, 2000.
(2 by 6 inch cardboard box with 37 hexagonal cardboard pieces)

Instructions on the box:
Solution provided by the manufacturer (http://www.give-me-a-clue.com):

--- 390 ---
Invisible

Lagoon Games 2007.
(plastic box and 18 half hexagon plastic plates, 3 by 5 by 3/4 inches)

Form a big hexagon from the 18 half hexagon pieces so that edges match. Puzzles of some type using half hexagons have been around for a long time (e.g., the 1924 patent of A. Chrehore). Here is the solution provided by the manufacturer (http://www.give-me-a-clue.com):



Further reading:
Crehore Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 1,495,576

--- 391 ---
Snake Pit


a.k.a. Other Name
Patented by xxx, purchased from xxx.
(cardboard box and 8 cardboard pieces, 5.2 by 5.2 by 7/8 inches)

--- 392 ---
Frog Pond


Copyright Binary Arts 1993.
(cardboard box and 15 cardboard pieces, 5.2 by 5.2 by 7/8 inches)

--- 393 ---
Tool Trouble


Copyright Great American Puzzle Factory, 1996.
(cardboard box and 17 cardboard pieces, 5.5 by 5.5 by 1 inch)

--- 394 ---
Transposer 6 & Bonbons
Patented by C. R. Weinreb 2000, made by Albatross Games / Toysmith Group 2006.

Transposer 6.
(6 cardboard pieces, each 3.5" on a side;
front and backs shown above)

Transposer Bonbons.
(6 cardboard pieces, each 3.5" on a side;
front and backs shown above)

Each circle on the plate is either colored or empty, and the problem is to stack the plates so that the two sides are a specified solid colors (Bonbons also gives some easier problems for one side). Jaap's Page presents solutions for these and some similar ones. Here are the problems given in the directions, which list them in order of increasing difficulty:



Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/trixxy.htm
Weinreb U.S. Patent Application, from: www.uspto.gov - no. 2005/0225032

--- 395 ---
Transposer Kaboozle


Same manufacture as Transposer 6 and Bonbons.
(4 cardboard pieces, each 3.5", backs shown below fronts in photos above)

Four plates must be stacked so that a path of a specified color on each side color connects the corner dots (and there are easier problems for only one side). Here are the ten problems that the directions list in increasing difficulty:


--- 396 ---
Tantrix Discovery

Tantrix Games 1997.
(holder and 10 plastic hexagonal pieces, 1.6 by 2.25 by 2.25 inches high)

Ten hexagonal tiles (numbered 1 through 10 on the backs) can be arranged in patterns, the highest level challenge being to make a loop of a given color (and matching edges of all adjacent tiles). The two sets shown above have different holders and background color, but the same tile patterns. Below, on the right are excerpts from the directions that came with the puzzles and on the left three ten tile loop solutions that are presented on Jaap's Page together with solutions to related puzzles (yellow and blue are switched from the sets shown here).




Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/tantrix.htm
Tantrix Home Page, from: http://www.tantrix.com

--- 397 ---
Tantrix Extreme

Tantrix Games 1991.
(mesh bag and 10 plastic hexagonal pieces, 1.8 inches point to point)

Like Tantrix Discovery, ten hexagonal tiles (numbered 1 through 10 on the backs) can be arranged in patterns, the highest level challenge being to make a loop of a given color (and matching edges of all adjacent tiles) or to make a pyramid with a continuous line through it. Four colors are used (as compared to three with Tantrix Discovery). Here are solutions presented on Jaap's Page for blue and red loops, a blue pyramid, and three red pyramids (the color white here is yellow there):







Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/tantrix.htm
Tantrix Home Page, from: http://www.tantrix.com

--- 398 ---
Tantrix Extreme Directions


--- 399 ---
Great Gears

Patented by K. Minami and T. Nishimiya 1984, made by Tomy.
(plastic with colored metal ball bearings, 4.3 inches square by 1/2 inch thick)

Turning a wheel on the side causes the center ring to turn one direction and all the other rings to turn in the opposite direction. When solved, the center ring and three of the outer rings have silver ball bearings, and the other three outer rings have bearings colored red, green, and blue, and the center ring is missing one ball bearing. The one missing bearing allows bearings to be moved around by turning the rings and transferring a bearing from one ring to an adjacent one that currently has the empty position. After mixing it up, it is difficult to get it back to the solved position because rings cannot be rotated individually.

Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/gears.htm
Minami and Nishimiya Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,468,033

--- 400 ---
Spectra

Copyright Eng's I.Q. Company Ltd. 1987.
(metal, 15 inches)

Each of 12 discs is colored with the same eight colors, but in different orders. The two discs on the left and right sides are attached to an arm (that rotates). In the center is a long arm, on its ends two shorter arms, and on their ends arms with pairs of discs. The discs themselves can all rotate. The task is to rotate the arms to place the discs in a straight line and then rotate the discs in such a way that colors match between adjacent discs and also between the left and right ends. The analysis on Jaap's Page shows that there are 12 ways to do this, but only one of them uses all eight colors:



Here is a side view of the arms when the discs are lined up in a straight line (as with a solved position):



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/spectra.htm
Lamphere's Article, from: http://portal.acm.org/portal.cfm

--- 401 ---
Directions from the Back of the Spectra Box


--- 402 ---
Instant Insanity

a.k.a. Katzenjammer, (Great) Tantalizer, Face-4, Cube-4,
Bognar Balls, Taktikolor, Frantic, Diabolical, Damblocks,
Symington's Puzzle

Patented by F. Schossow 1900, this popular version by Parker Brothers 1967.
(standard: four plastic cubes, each 1.25 inches square;
mini: four plastic cubes, each 5/8 inches square)

Arrange the cubes in a line so that each side has four different colors (it is not possible to arrange them so that all colors on a side are the same). The puzzle, in both the standard and the mini version, was sold without a box, wrapped with the directions:



The solution is unique up to the ordering of cubes or rotating them all 180 degrees in one dimension (the mini is the same except that green and red are reversed);



Further Reading
Wikipedia Page, from: http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_Insanity
Rob Stegmann's Page, from: http://www.robspuzzlepage.com
Schossow Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 646,463
Silkman Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 2,024,541
Bognar UK Patent Application, GB 2,076,663.

--- 403 ---
Expressing Instant Insanity as a Graph Problem
  1. Draw four vertices), and label them green, white, blue, red; it doesn't matter how they are arranged (after solving, the figure below was re-drawn to look nicer).
  2. Number the cubes from 1 to 4 and for each of the three pairs of opposite faces on each cube, draw an edge between the two vertices of the corresponding colors and label that edge by that cube number (a total of 12 edges).
  3. Look for a Hamilton cycle (that passes through each vertex once) with a different label on each edge; this cycle is shown with the thick edges below (it is also ok to use set of smaller disjoint cycles but that doesn't help here).
  4. Find a second Hamilton cycle (or set of cycles) with a different label on each edge, that does not uses any of the edges in the first cycle; this cycle is shown with the hashed edges in the figure below.
  5. Traverse the thick edge cycle to set the top edges (green to blue set the top and bottom of cube 3, blue to white to set the top and bottom of cube 2, white to red to set the top and bottom of cube 4, and red to green to set the top and bottom of cube 1).
  6. Set the front/back edges with the hashed cycle by rotating each cube (without changing the top and bottom).
Efficient algorithms are not known for finding Hamilton cycles (let alone two disjoint ones). However, this is a small graph, and it provides an organized way to search for these two cycles rather than playing with the cubes and trying to remember what has been tried.



cycle 1: G - 3 - B - 2 - W - 4 - R - 1 - G
cycle 2: G - 2 - B - 1 - W - 3 - R - 4 - G

--- 404 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity


Parker Brothers, Copyright 1986, made in China.
(same size 1.25 inch plastic cubes as the 1967 puzzle)

--- 405 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

Katzenjammer Puzzle, patented by Frederick A. Schossow 1900.
(cardboard tray & sleeve, and four 3/4 inch wood cubes)

Same as instant insanity with red -> hearts, green -> clubs, blue -> diamonds,
white -> spades, and cube 3 has the two hidden faces reversed:


These two puzzles have identical cubes (except the green color of the clubs on the right is faded). Here are the top, front, and back, of the two boxes, which are similar but not the same, and also the bottoms, where the one on the left is blank and the one on the right has promotional text:




--- 406 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

FOURACE Puzzle, Britain, 1913.
(cardboard box 1+7/8" x 1+7/8" x 3+7/8", and four paper covered wood cubes,
where the cube edges vary in length from 13/16" to 15/16")

Box says "Provisionally Protected"; Stegman's Page credits J. Slocum as dating this puzzle to Gamage's in Britain 1913. The solution is the same as for the Katzenjammer Puzzle:



Here are the top, front, back, and bottom sides of the box (the box back advertises "The Great Card Puzzle"):



--- 407 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

Great Tantalizer Puzzle, provisional patent no. 18945, not dated.
(cardboard box, and four 3/4 inch wood cubes)

Same as instant insanity with green -> white, white -> brown, and cube 3 has the two hidden faces reversed:



Here are views of the left end, top, front, bottom, back, and right end:


--- 408 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

Tantalizer, made in England, not dated.
(cardboard box, solution sheet, and four 3/4 inch wood cubes; packaged with tie wraps to cardboard back shown on right above)

Same as instant insanity with yellow instead of white:



The solution sheet that came with the puzzle shows the same solution as above,

with cubes in the order 1, 4, 2, 3 and all rotated 180 degrees:



Here are the directions on the bottom of the box:


--- 409 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued


Symington's Puzzle, W. Symington & Co., Harborough, England, not dated.
(cardboard tray & sleeve, and four 1 inch cardboard cubes)

Same as instant insanity with red -> IDEAL TABLE CREAM (red), green->SOUPS (light blue), blue -> CUSTARD POWDER (white), white -> GRAVY (red with brown triangle), and cube 3 has the two hidden faces reversed:



Here are views of the top, front, and back (the bottom is the same as the top):




--- 410 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

"Face 4" made by Ideal Toy Co. 1980.
(tray, cover, and four 1" pieces,
same as Instant Insanity with red -> green and green -> orange)


"Cube-4", except for name on cover is identical to Face-4.
(tray, cover, and four 1" pieces,
same as Instant Insanity with red -> green and green -> orange)




Hungarian "Bognar Buvos Golyok", patented by Jozef Bogner 1981 (GB2076663).
(4 inches long, 1" diameter, balls rotate in place, white / brown / black balls,
same as Instant Insanity with the 1234 order changed to 3142
and with red -> yellow, green -> red/orange, blue -> green, white -> blue)

--- 411 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

Taktikolor, manufactured in Hungary, circa 1980?
(box and four 1.5 inch square plastic pieces with colored paper stickers,
same as instant insanity with green->red, white->yellow, red->green,
and for both cubes 3 and 4 the hidden faces are reversed)


Frantic, Wellingtons Ltd Stamford, UK, 1982.
(box and four 1.5 inch square plastic pieces,
same as instant insanity with green->red, white->yellow, red->blue, blue->green
and with hidden faces of cubes 3 and 4 reversed)


Diabolical, Wellingtons Ltd, Stamford, UK, 1982.
(package and four 1.5 inch square plastic pieces,
same as instant insanity with green->1, white->2, red->3, blue->4,
and with hidden faces of cubes 3 and 4 reversed)

--- 412 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

Cat Puzzle, Copyright 1996 K. Miller / Images & Editions Stamford Lincs, England.
(cardboard box 4.25" x 4.25" x 1.5", solution sheet, and four 1.375" plastic cubes)

The box back and solution sheet are shown below. The solution is the same as instant insanity with the hidden faces of cubes 3 and 4 reversed, where red = "WIDE EYED CAT", green = "TABLE CAT", white = "TARTAN CAT", blue = "WHITE CAT" (the columns of the solution sheet correspond to cubes 1, 3, 4, 2):




--- 413 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

Crazy Cubes, circa 1960's?
(four 1.25 inch square wood pieces labeled with whisky and numbers;
same as instant insanity with green -> 1, white -> 2, red -> 3, blue -> 4)

Sold solved with plastic over the pieces in a tray, with the directions on the back of the tray and the solution sheet under the pieces, where the cubes are arranged as shown in these photos (left is top and front, right is bottom and back):



By exchanging the right two cubes and then spinning each cube 180 degrees, the same presentation as for instant insanity on the first page is obtained:


--- 414 ---
Other Versions of Instant Insanity, Continued

Damblocks, Schaper Manufacturing Co., Minneapolis, Minn., 1968.
(package and four 1.2 inch square plastic pieces with colored paper stickers,
same as instant insanity with white->yellow)


Made by RainTree and purchased 2000.
(box and 4 pieces, each 7/8" inches square,
same as Instant Insanity with red -> green, green -> yellow, white -> red)



Made by Mr. Puzzle Australia and purchased 2005.
(tray and 4 pieces, each 1.5 inches square,
same as Instant Insanity with red -> circle, green -> Square, blue -> hexagon, white -> diamond)

--- 415 ---
The Grand Army Puzzle

Circa late 1800's?
(7/8 by 7/8 by 2.1 inch box with three identical 5/8" wood cubes;
original label on top was lost and replaced by a copy from an identical puzzle)

The Grand Army Of the Republic was a veterans organization formed after the American civil war (see the Wikipedia page). This puzzle has three identical cubes, each colored red, white, and blue on three pairs of adjacent faces. Like the four cube Instant Insanity puzzle, the object is to arrange the three cubes in a line so that each side has no duplicate colors. Below is a solution and its graph (constructed as for Instant Insanity); it is unique up to repositioning the puzzle and reordering the cubes (e.g., replacing cycle 2 by R - 3 - W - 1 - B - 2 - R is the same as rotating 180 degrees, rotating forward 90 degrees, and exchanging cubes 1 and 2):



cycle 1: R - 1 - W - 2 - B - 3 - R
cycle 2: R - 2 - W - 3 - B - 1 - R


Further Reading
Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Army_of_the_Republic

--- 416 ---
The Allies Flag Puzzle



a.k.a. The Allied Flags Puzzle
Valentine & Sons, Ltd., Dundee, British Manufacture, circa 1918.
(1 x 1 x 4.4 inch cardboard box and five paper covered 13/16" wood cubes;
labels from Henry's of Manchester are on side and bottom of box;
similar in name and theme to the Allies Flags Puzzle)

The cube sides have flags from World War I (British, French, Belgian, Japanese, Russian). Like the four block Instant Insanity puzzle, the object is to arrange the five cubes in a line so that each side has no duplicate flags. Here are the directions that came with it:


Here are two solutions and their corresponding graphs (constructed in the same way as for Instant Insanity), where in the first both cycles use the same Hamilton path, but in the second the first cycle follows a different route:


cycle 1: BR - 2 - BE - 5 - F - 1 - J - 3 - R - 4 - BR
cycle 2: BR - 3 - BE - 4 - F - 2 - J - 5 - R - 1 - BR


cycle 1: BR - 1 - BE - 2 - R - 3 - J - 4 - F - 5 - BR
cycle 2: BR - 3 - BE - 4 - F - 2 - J - 5 - R - 1 - BR

--- 417 ---
The Allies Flags Puzzle

Circa 1920's?
(left / right bottom: 2.15" x 2.7" x 1" box and 5 paper covered 3/4" wood cubes;
right top: 1.3" x 4.2" x 1" box and and same cubes as puzzle on left)

Similar in name and theme to the Allies Flag Puzzle, cubes have flags from World War I (U.S., British, Red Cross, Russian, Republic Of China). Like the Instant Insanity puzzle, the object is to arrange the five cubes in a line so that each side has no duplicate flags. Here is a solution and its corresponding graph (constructed in the same way as for Instant Insanity):



cycle 1: US - 1 - Russian - 4 - British - 3 - Red Cross - 2 - Republic Of China - 5 - US
cycle 2: US - 2 - Russian - 3 - British - 4 - Red Cross - 4 - Republic Of China - 1 - US

--- 418 ---
Tantalizing Ten




Made in Japan, undated.
(Cardboard box 1.6" x 1.4" x 5.5" with 4 1+3/8" wood cubes.)

In the theme of Instant Insanity, arrange the cubes in a row so that all four numbers appear on each side. Above is the solution and by numbering the cubes 1 to 4 going from left to right, the corresponding solution graph (unlike instant Insanity there are no colors, numbers are used to label both the cubes and the faces of the cubes).

--- 419 ---
Cuss


Copyright 1976 Onsworld Limited, England.
(four plastic cubes, clues and solution cards, cardboard box 1+5/8" x 1+5/8" x 6.5")

In a theme a bit like Instant Insanity, arrange the cubes so that all sides show an English word. Although the solution included has the letters in correct orientation on all sides, the directions do not say if it is allowed to have a letter on its side or upside down, and two of the letters, N/Z and U/C can be read differently depending on orientation. In the diagram above the letters on the outer and inside faces have their correct orientations, except the R and T on the right of the second and third cubes are rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise, and the D on the right of the fourth cube is flipped horizontally.

Here are the "clues" and solution cards provided:



Here are the top and bottom of the box:


Here are the front and back of the box:

--- 420 ---
Iribako

Made in the Czech Republic 1983.
(box and six 1.2 inch plastic cubes)

Each of the six cubes has a different one of the colors red, blue, green, yellow, white, and black on each side. This puzzle is similar to Drives You Crazy, but with a different color pattern. Like the four block Instant Insanity puzzle, the object is to arrange the cubes in a line so that each side has no duplicate colors. Here is a solution and its corresponding graph (constructed the same way as for Instant Insanity):




cycle 1: Y - 1 - B - 2 - G - 3 - W - 4 - BK - 5 - R - 6 - Y
cycle 2: Y - 4 - G - 5 - B - 6 - W - 1 - R - 3 - BK - 2 - Y

--- 421 ---
Drives You Crazy

Purchased from Mefferts 2007.
(six 1.5 inch foam cubes)

Each of the six cubes has a different one of the colors red, blue, light blue, green, yellow, and orange on each side. This puzzle is similar to Iribako, but with a different color pattern. Like the four block Instant Insanity puzzle, the object is to arrange the cubes in a line so that each side has no duplicate colors. Here is a solution and its corresponding graph (constructed the same way as for Instant Insanity):




cycle 1: Y - 2 - G - 1 - O - 4 - LB - 6 - R - 3 - B - 5 - Y
cycle 2: Y - 3 - O - 6 - G - 5 - LB - 1 - B - 2 - R - 4 - Y

--- 422 ---
Boer War Puzzle

Based on a puzzle produced in 1899; this version made by J. A. Storer, 2011.
(plastic box 1.5" x 2.5" x 3.3", instruction card,
and four 1+3/16" painted wood blocks with vinyl stickers)

Arrange the cubes in a 2x2 array so that all four letters appear on the top and bottom faces, all four letters appear on the left and right sides, and all four letters appear on the front and back sides. The letters are based on the names of two Boer generals, Joubert and Cronje, and two British generals, Buller and Warren, from an 1899 production of this puzzle.

We begin with a different puzzle; here the graph constructed as for Instant Insanity; we use letters to label faces and number the cubes 1 = green, 2 = red, 3 = brown, and 4 = yellow:


The two cycles, labeled by the thick edges and the hashed edges, give the following instant insanity like solution to arranging the cubes in a 1x4 array so that all for sides show the 4 letters; note that unlike the solution for instant insanity, one of the Hamilton cycles is actually a set of two cycles, a self loop and a cycle of three vertices:

cycle set 1: (J - 1 - W - 2 - C - 3 - B - 4 - J)
cycle set 2: (J - 2 - J) (C - 1 - B - 3 - W - 4 - C)

--- 423 ---
(Boer War Puzzle Continued)
Solution idea: Unlike instant insanity, the graph of the preceding page does not give us a complete solution, because we cannot use disjoint cycle sets to simultaneously set both the top / bottom faces and the sides. Instead, we use each cycle set for a way to set the top / bottom faces that may lead to one or more complete solutions, by searching a new graph that describes the ways that cubes can be in a 2x2 array without changing the top / bottom faces. These secondary graphs are constructed below by going around the sides of each cube in a clockwise direction, where when we go from face X to face Y, we place a directed edge (an edge with an arrow) from vertex X to vertex Y (a total of 16 edges). We now look for cycle sets, but with the rule that the direction of arrows must reverse when going from one cube to an adjacent cube, or stay the same when skipping a corner (that uses a self-loop) and going to the opposite corner.

Solutions based on cycle set 1: Cubes 1 (green) and 4 (yellow) form self-loops; if they are adjacent then the red and green edges can be used to cycle between cubes 2 and 3, and if they are diagonally opposite, then the red and blue edges can be used to cycle between cubes 2 and 3. In both cases, and alternate solution can be formed by exchanging cubes 1 and 4:


Solutions based on cycle set 2: We find a solution based on self-loops for cubes 1 and 4 when they are diagonally opposite (and an alternate solution exchanges cubes 1 and 4):


Further Reading
Boer Wars Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boer_war

--- 424 ---
Bolygok

Patented by Jozef Bogner 1981.
(white / brown bodies, 1.7 inches)

Bolygok means planets in Hungarian. A generalization of the Hungarian version of Instant Insanity ("Bognar Buvos Golyok"). Rotate the balls to make patterns such as each side with all four colors or each side with the same color. The directions that come with it are in a long strip; here are pieces of it:



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/bolygok.htm
Bognar UK Patent Application, GB 2,076,663.

--- 425 ---
Double Disaster

KMS Industries, Alexandria, VA, 1968.
(plastic, 1.75 inches;
directions are in the bottom)

Take the eight cubes out of the case and arrange them in a single 2x2x2 cube to make different patterns. The cubes have one of the colors red, blue, green, and white on each face. The card that is in the bottom of the cage challenges give a number of challenges, including making each face showing all four colors:



--- 426 ---
Mental Blocks

KMS Industries, Alexandria, VA, 1968.
(plastic, 1.75 inches;
directions are in the bottom)

Each of the eight cubes has three colored rods going through it, one in each of the x, y, and z directions (four of the cubes have a red, blue, and white rod, two of the cubes have two reds and a white, one has two reds and a blue, and one has two whites and a blue). Take the eight cubes out of the case and arrange them in a single 2x2x2 cube to make continuous rods of the same color passing through it:



--- 427 ---
Disney Cubes


Handle says "Clementoni"; unknown date of manufacture.
(plastic with paper surfaces, 12 pieces, 6 by 6.5 by 1.75 inches)

Position the blocks to make a Disney scene. Newer puzzles of this type are shown on the 2008 Clementoni web page (www.clementoni.com) as their 12 piece "super color cubes".

--- 428 ---
Make A Dice

a.k.a. Spots Puzzle
St. Pierre & Patterson Mfg. Co. 1957.
(cardboard tray and nine 2 x 5/8 inch wood bars with recessed white dots;
shown as the "Spots Puzzle" on pages 98-99, 130-131 of the 1893 Hoffmann book)

Assemble nine 1x1x3 unit bars into a die; from left to right in the photo above, the dots are:
1. no dots
2. left end
3. top center
4. top center
5. top left, end right
6. top left & right
7. top left & right, end left & right
8. top left & right, end left & right, front right
9. top left & right, end left, front left & right
Here are close-up views of portions of the back of the box:


--- 429 ---
Twice Dice


Pentangle Puzzles And Games, England, 2009.
(plastic box and 9 L-shaped wood pieces, 1+7/8 inches)

Assemble the nine L-shaped pieces into a die, with either legal green spots on the outside or legal red spots. Sold in the green solution, which is a "right-handed" die; the red solution is a "left-handed die". Directions tell how to get a "Certificate of Failure". Here are photos of two stages of taking these two solutions apart:



--- 430 ---
Loony Tunes Blocks

Copyright Warner Brothers 1992.
(wood base and 8 blocks, 4 inches)

Slide the 8 blocks onto the 4 posts to make a 2x2 cube so that each of the 4 sides shows a single character. Below are photos of the other two solved sides and the blocks arranged to show the 8 distinct characters used (each block has some combination of 4 of these): Tweety Bird, Bugs Bunny, Road Runner, Daffy Duck, Marvin the Martian, Sylvester, Wile E. Coyote, Taz (Tasmanian Devil).



--- 431 ---
Smarts Pyramid

Copyright 2003 & Design Patent 2006 by Use Your Head Unlimited.
(plastic, base + top + 10 pairs of 1" diameter balls)

There are 10 pairs of colored balls, one pair for each of the possible pairs of the five colors white, yellow, orange, pink, and blue:



These pairs must be placed to form a pyramid so that no two balls of the same color are touching. The directions say that you should also not allow the same colors to touch as you are building, even for places that are not visible when the puzzle is completed. This is a relatively easy puzzle that is fun for children. It has more than one solution. The puzzle pictured here is the golf version; the same puzzle has also been advertised / sold with other sports themes (soccer, baseball, basketball, tennis, football).

The manufacturer has filed a number of design patents relating to this puzzle and its junior version. P. Roberts and A. Kuwagaki & S. Takenaka have 1970's patents on pyramids using pieces formed from more complicated arrangements of balls.

Further reading:
Thompson Design Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. D524,381
Roberts Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 3,945,645
Kuwagaki Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 3,837,652

--- 432 ---
Smarts Pyramid Jr.

Copyright 2000 & Design Patents 2005 by Use Your Head Unlimited.
(plastic, base + top + 5 pairs of 1" diameter balls

There are 5 pairs of colored balls, using the colors white, yellow, pink, and blue (all of the 6 possible combinations except pink-blue):



These pairs must be placed to form a pyramid so that no two balls of the same color are touching. The directions say that you should also not allow the same colors to touch as you are building, even for places that are not visible when the puzzle is completed. This is a relatively easy puzzle that is fun for children; it has fewer pieces that the Smarts Puzzle 4 high pyramid made by the same company. It has more than one solution. The puzzle pictured here is the golf version; the same puzzle has also been advertised / sold with other sports themes (soccer, baseball, basketball, tennis, football).

Further reading:
Thompson Design Patents, from: www.uspto.gov - patent nos. D500,533, D500,534, D500,535, D500,816.

--- 433 ---
The Rock

Probably made in Hungary in the 1980's.
(plastic, 3.5 inches)

Made by Tantrix, purchased 2007.
(3 inches)

Rotate the hexagonal and square faces so that the edges match. Fairly easy to solve because by starting at one vertex where three faces meet, there are not many possibilities, and then you can start working your way around. The bottom face of the Hungarian version is plain black. The faces of the tantrix version ("The Rock") can also be snapped off and put on in different positions to make different puzzles.

The 1983 patent of Sasso describes a similar idea for a regular solid shape where pairs of opposite faces rotate together.

Further Reading
Sasso Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,416,453

--- 434 ---
Einstein Cube

Patented by REFO Verlag GmbH 2002.
(plastic, 2.6 inches)

Turn the 6 rings so at each of the 12 places they meet the colors match. This is a slightly simpler and more colorful version of the Turn 12 puzzle that as 24 numbers on each ring (each in the range 3 to 9, where matching is by adjacent numbers summing to 12 - see Jaap's Page). Here are the directions that came with the puzzle:



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/turn12.htm
REFO DE Patent, from: www.epo.org - patent no. DE20112728

--- 435 ---
Rubik Triamid

Patented by Rubik 1991, copyright Matchbox 1990.
(3.5 inches)

When assembled, the four sides of the pyramid are red, blue, yellow, and white. Moves consists of unsnapping a portion rotating it and snapping it back on.



Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/triamid.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/r90/trmd0.htm
Rubik HU Patent. from: www.epo.org - patent no. HU207233

--- 436 ---
Other 3D Shape Assembly

Although cubes and various types of burrs are among the most common shapes for assembly puzzles, beautiful craftsmanship, often from wood, has gone into puzzles of many shapes. Some employ coordinate motion (a term used by Stewart Coffin) where pieces must be slide together simultaneously when assembling.

--- 437 ---
Two Piece Pyramid


Patented E. Johnson 1940, David Co. circa 1990's?, lower right circa 1960's?.
(top: 3.5"x2.7"x1.4" box, two 3" wood pieces, and directions;
lower right: 2.5"x1.75"x1/2" plastic box and two plastic pieces)

Further Reading
Johnson Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 2,216,915

--- 438 ---
Three Piece Tetrahedron


Designed by Wayne Daniel, made and sold by Interlocking Puzzles 2002.
(Jarrah, 3 pieces, each edge 3.5 inches when assembled)

--- 439 ---
Four Piece Pyramid, Version 1

Box says "MADE IN U.S.A. S.K. & CO.", circa 1950?
(cardboard box and 4 wood pieces, 2.5 inches)

Like the classic Two Piece Pyramid where each piece has been cut in half. Here are photos of it being assembled:



--- 440 ---
Four Piece Pyramid, Version 2


Designed by W. Schneider, copyright Binary Arts, 1998.
(4 identical plastic pieces, 3.25 inches on a side when assembled)

--- 441 ---
Four Piece Tetrahedron




Designed by Wayne Daniel, made and sold by Interlocking Puzzles 2002.
(Jarrah and Maple, 4 pieces, each edge 4.75 inches when assembled;
as shown above, comes apart into two 2-piece assemblies)

--- 442 ---
Truncated Tetrahedron

Designed by Wayne Daniel, made and sold by Interlocking Puzzles, 2003.
(Paduk and Maple, 4 pieces, 3.5 inches)

Two pairs of identical pieces slide together simultaneously. The solved puzzle has a maple diamond on each face where one point meets the point of a diamond on an edge shared with an adjacent face. Here are views of the start of coming apart, and the four pieces:



To solve, as shown on the left below, determine how to assemble two halves that are in the solved state, spread each apart to just coming apart, and with one par in each hand position carefully so that everything can be pushed together. The photo on the right below shows the side not shown in the photo at the top of this page.


--- 443 ---
Five Piece Tetrahedron




Designed by Wayne Daniel, made and sold by Interlocking Puzzles 2002.
(Jatoba and Maple, 5 pieces, each edge 6 inches when assembled;
as shown above, comes apart into a 3-piece and 2-piece assembly)

--- 444 ---
Truncated Octahedra

Designed by Steve Smith, made and sold by Interlocking Puzzles 2004.
(sequential assembly version: Maple, 4 pieces, 3.5 inches,
simultaneous movement version: Jarrah, 4 pieces, 3.5 inches)

These two puzzles have the same size and shape, with six square faces and eight hexagon faces; they were both designed by Steve Smith of Interlocking Puzzles (Interlocking Puzzles also made a third easer puzzle of the same size and shape that was designed by Wayne Daniel). The one on the left above requires sequential assembly of the four pieces in a specific order. The one on the right requires all four pieces to move simultaneously. Here is some of what the designer said about this simultaneous movement and a photo of the puzzle coming apart:
"All four pieces must move simultaneously; there are two pairs of mirror image pieces made from Jarrah. There are 4 "solid" faces where the entire face is part of the same piece and four "multi' faces where the face has sections from three different pieces. Two of the multi faces (which are opposite each other) have a triangular shaped section, a diamond shaped section, and a trapezoid shaped section (the other two have two triangular sections and one larger non-convex section); by holding on to these two faces you can push the puzzle apart (all eight faces remain parallel as the puzzle expands)."


--- 445 ---
Truncated Cubes

a.k.a. Cuboctahedron
Designed by Steve and Leslie Smith, made and sold by Interlocking Puzzles 2004;
box made by J. A. Storer 2004.

(5 pieces: Jatoba, 4.5 inches,
6 pieces: Peroba Rosa, 4.5 inches,
7 pieces: Jarrah, 4.5 inches,
box is 3/8 inch plexiglass with metal hardware, 5 by 5 by 12 inches)

These three puzzles have the same size and shape, with six square faces and eight triangular faces (corresponding to where the corners of the cube have been truncated). The five piece version was designed by Steve Smith and the 6 and 7 piece versions by Steve and Leslie Smith. Here is some of what they say about these three puzzles:
Five piece Truncated Cube: "Each piece is a challenge, even after removing the first three, getting the last two apart and together isn't easy. Reassembly? Let's just say this should NOT be the first polyhedra puzzle of ours you work with."

Six piece Truncated Cube: "A small internal space requires multiple moves to get the first piece out."

Seven piece Truncated Cube: "Unique trilateral symmetry makes this puzzle quite difficult. This puzzle can be thought of as two three piece puzzles, with a key piece that holds it all together."

--- 446 ---
Garnet

Designed by Stewart Coffin, purchased from Cubic Dissection 2004.
(wood, 6 pieces, 2.5 inches)



--- 447 ---
Y-Knot

Purchased from Toys From Times Past, 2014.
(3 identical pieces, each made from 4 3/8" thick parallelograms;
when assembled 3" side to side, 1.5" high)

A first the pieces seem locked together. The pieces move simultaneously to disassemble, and the trick is to push on the top layer in the correct way to spread them apart:


--- 448 ---
Three Piece Block

Designed, made, and sold by Stewart Coffin in 1970's and early 1980's.
(mahogany, 3 pieces, 4 inches;
one of 6 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in the early 1980's)

Described in Stewart Coffin's book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections; here is some of what he says in the directions that came with the puzzle:
"The one symmetrical face of the assembled puzzle happens to resemble a certain corporate logo. The company wanted a simple puzzle incorporating this pattern for some sort of promotional scheme. So the arrangement of six of the blocks was already determined. All that was required to complete the design was the addition of four more blocks in a sort of triangular pyramid and a judicious choice of glue joints to make it into an interesting interlocking puzzle. So the company got what they wanted - except for one thing. It turned out to be anything but simple!"
When apart, it is hard to visualize what it is supposed to look like when assembled (although once assembled, you know you have it). Here are photos showing the piece orientations for assembly and the first of the two steps that puts together the two three block pieces:


--- 449 ---
Three Boxy

Vin & Co., purchased from Bits & Pieces 2007.
(wood, 6 pieces, 3.5 inches)

Here are the directions and solution that were sold with the puzzle:



--- 450 ---
Three Bunnies

Designed and made by Stewart Coffin, 1997.
(wood, 3.25" by 1.75" high, each pod is 1.5" between parallel faces;
written to the right of the International Puzzle Party sticker
is the designer number / signature / date)

Three pieces come apart with simultaneous movement:


--- 451 ---
118-X


Designed and made by Stewart Coffin, 2010.
(wood, 3.25" by 1.75" high, each pod is 1.5" between parallel faces;
signed on the inside;
one of 4 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in 2014)

The name of this puzzle appears to come from the Three Bunnies puzzle, which has the same size and shape and is 118 in the author's new numbering system in the Coffin AP-ART book.

--- 452 ---
Three Pairs

Designed, made, and sold by Stewart Coffin in 1970's and early 1980's.
(left: Mahogany, 6 pieces, 4 inches
right: Cherry, 6 pieces, 4 inches;
the one on the left was purchased at auction in 2001, the cherry one on the right is
one of 6 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in the early 1980's;
he called this cherry one a "crude loose-fitting prototype",
but of course it has terrific fit, and although it has some nicks
and pencil marks on the interior edges, overall it is a beautiful puzzle)

Described in Stewart Coffin's book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections; here is some of what he says in the directions that came with the puzzle:
"To disassemble, grasp the opposite pairs of pieces, and gently pull and wiggle until you discover the combination that separates it diagonally into halves. The wiggle the pieces apart until you discover the strange action that separates each half into three pieces."
The name is a joke that implies that each of the three axes is formed from some sort of pair configuration; that is, the implication being that the puzzle works something like a burr, where pieces slide in and out parallel to the three axes. In fact, it splits into two halves of 3 pieces each along a diagonal plane. Then, the two halves each come apart by simultaneous motion of all three pieces. Below, the left shows the two halves and the right shows one of the pairs:


--- 453 ---
Augmented Four Corners

Designed, made, and sold by Stewart Coffin in 1970's and early 1980's.
(Cherry and Rosewood, 6 pieces, 4.5 inches;
one of 6 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in the early 1980's)

Described in Stewart Coffin's book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections; here is some of what he says in the directions that came with the puzzle:
"The Augmented Four Corners Puzzle consists of six dissimilar interlocking pieces which assemble in one way only, with one sliding axis, to form a geometrical solid with tetrahedral symmetry."
Use the three pieces shown below to put together the top (shown with a rubber band) so that the "legs" that hang down have vertical sides that will slide down onto the other three pieces.


--- 454 ---
Turnabout

Design Science Toys LTD, Tivoli, NY, circa 1990's?
(wood with magnets, 4 inches)

Wood pieces with magnets, each in the shape of a rhombic hexahedron (a slanted cube), can be assembled into shapes, including the same shape as the Augmented Four Corners puzzle. The sheet that comes with the puzzle motivates the use of these pieces from the angles found in carbon molecules.


--- 455 ---
Triumph

Designed, made, and sold by Stewart Coffin in 1970's and early 1980's.
(Rosewood and Tulipwood, 6 pieces, 4 inches;
one of 6 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in the early 1980's)

Described in Stewart Coffin's book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections; here is some of what he says in the directions that came with the puzzle:
"This puzzle has the most unusual capability of being assembled into three different symmetrical solid shapes, even though its six pieces are all identical in shape."
Four assembled shapes are shown in Stewart Coffin's book Geometric Puzzle Design; where he discusses the 4-piece Fusion Confusion; version of this puzzle. One shape is the "star" shown above (6 points running vertically); below are two ways to pull it apart into two sets of three pieces. Another is the "hex ring" (a vertical hexagonal cylinder with a ring around the middle) that is show below, and to its right a way to pull it apart. Note that rubber bands have been used in these figures to hold pieces in place while photographed.



--- 456 ---
Fusion Confusion

Designed by Stewart Coffin, made by interlocking puzzles 2001.
(Paduak and Guatam, 4 pieces, 3.3 inches)

The four pieces of this puzzle are formed by joining two pairs of the six pieces of the Triumph puzzle. Triumph is described in Coffin's book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections, and this puzzle is described in his book Geometric Puzzle Design, where he says that it has all of the original four solutions of the original Triumph puzzle, but with "only one confusing diagonal axis of assembly". To make the star shape, first join two pairs, and then slide the two halves together:



--- 457 ---
Rosebud

Designed, made, and sold by Stewart Coffin in 1970's and early 1980's.
(Mahogany, 6 pieces, 4 inches;
one of 6 puzzles purchased during a visit with the designer in the early 1980's;
handwritten on the directions Stewart Coffin says "second, nicks and scratches, poor fit";
of course, as you would expect, the puzzle looks great and has a good fit)

Described in Stewart Coffin's book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections; here is some of what he says in the directions that came with the puzzle:
"Examine the six individual puzzle pieces and note that there are three identical pieces which we shall arbitrarily refer to as "left-handed" pieces, and three right-handed pieces likewise identical except that one of them has a tapered hole with a pin stuck into it. To assemble the pinwheel solution, first remove the pin and set it aside. Sub-assemble the three left-handed pieces into one sub-assembly, and the three right-handed pieces into another, and mate the two halves. The resulting solution has an axis of symmetry. The other symmetrical solution, known as the Rosebud solution, requires the simultaneous manipulation of all six pieces."

--- 458 ---
Twelve Piece Separation

Designed by Stewart Coffin, made by interlocking puzzles 2002.
(Peroba Rosa, 12 pieces, 5 inches)

In Geometric Puzzle Design, Stewart Coffin says: "Twelve sticks of triangular cross-section with pyramidal end blocks assemble with some difficulty to form a symmetrical interlocking burr." Here is the solution that was sold with the puzzle (pieces are numbered in assembly order):

Step 1: Assemble pieces #1, #2, and #3 to form a triangular base.

Step 2: When in place piece #4 will stand vertically with piece #5 parallel to piece #3. Piece #5 is the only piece with an extra augmentation. Assemble with the augmentation directly to the left of piece #2. Hold #4 loosely to allow #5 to slide in under the hook of #2.

Step 3: When in place piece #6 will be parallel to #4. To assemble, piece #6 hooks around #2 from below and slides up through next to #4.

--- 459 ---
Twelve Piece Separation Solution Continued
Step 4: When in place piece #7 will be parallel to piece #1. To assemble, first push piece #1 all the way into the puzzle. This allows piece #3 to move to the left giving room for piece #7.

Step 5: Insert piece #7. Slide piece #3 back to the right and #1 forward.

Step 6: When in place piece #8 will be parallel to piece #2. To assemble, place #8 on the right side by hooking around #4 and sliding through #1.

Step 7: Now the puzzle has enough pieces in place to hold together better. When in place piece #9 will stand vertically, parallel to piece #4 and #6. To assemble, drop #4 down and move piece #7 back away from you. Bring #8 towards you until enough opening is made to allow for #9.

--- 460 ---
Twelve Piece Separation Solution Continued
Step 8: Insert #9 by hooking around #3. Push #8 back in place to allow #4 to come back up. Make sure #9 is all the way down to allow #7 to slide back towards you. Bring #9 up to its final place. When in place piece #10 is parallel to #5 and #3. To assemble, hook the end of #10 around #8 and slide left under #9.

Step 9: When in place piece #11 is parallel to #8 and #2. To assemble, first drop #4 and #6 down. Slide #8 all the way towards you. Then move #10 to the left just enough.

Step 10: This allows #11 to be inserted underneath #10 with its end hooking around #7. Slide #10 back to the right. Now #8 slides back to allow #4 up. Make sure #11 is all the way towards you to allow #6 to come back up.

Steps 11 & 12: Move #11 to its final place. Then the key piece #12 moves in parallel to #7 to touch the augmented place on #5.

--- 461 ---
Crystal Pyramid

"Crystall Pyramide", made in China, purchased 2009.
(15 wood pieces and base, 5.75 by 5.75 by 3.5 inches high)

Pieces formed from wood rods glued together must be placed on a base (that has some black rods glued to it) to form a pyramid; here is the solution that was sold with the puzzle:


--- 462 ---
Jig Saw Dog

Received as a gift from D. Storer, 2005.
(Cherry, 12.5 inches assembled)

Pull out the white peg that goes through to make the eyes, and the puzzle comes apart in a mor or less linear fashion; about midway through there is a small compartment containing a wood duck:


--- 463 ---
Wonder Puzzle Block


B. B. Shackman & Co., New York, circa 1940?
(wood, 1.7 by 1.7 by 2.9 inches; end not shown says "MADE IN U.S.A.)

--- 464 ---
3x3 Chinese Zigzag

Unknown maker, circa 1930's?
(wood, 3/4 inches square by 3 inches long)

A simpler 3x3 version (3 wavy horizontal cuts and 3 wavy vertical cuts) of the 4x4 puzzle described on page 109 of the 1893 Hoffmann book.

--- 465 ---
3x4 Chinese Zigzag

From the grandfather of J. A. Storer; circa 1900?
(wood, 2.4 by 2.75 by 1.9 inches)

A simpler 3x4 version (3 wavy horizontal cuts and 4 wavy vertical cuts) of the 4x4 puzzle described on page 109 of the 1893 Hoffmann book.

--- 466 ---
Four Piece Jig Saw Puzzle

Patented K. Walker & designed with H. Nelson, made by Binary Arts, circa 2000.
(four plastic pieces, 4 x 4 x 3/4 inches assembled)

The four pieces do not simply come apart as it appears they might; careful positioning and twisting is required; here is the solution that was sold with the puzzle:



Further Reading

Walker Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 5,409,227

--- 467 ---
Wonders Of The World Cube Puzzle




Made in Japan, circa 1960's?
(wood, 1+7/8 inches)

--- 468 ---
Oskar's Matchboxes

Designed by Oskar van Deventer, made by Eric Fuller 2010.
(Pau Ferro and Quilted Maple, 3 inches)

Five pieces, each composed of the shape of a matchbox cover attached to a matchbox tray assemble to a single shape. Here are the pieces:



The two pieces on the top left slide together, then as shown below the pairs of vertical pieces slide together (and the third step slides the two halves together):


--- 469 ---
Pin-Hole Puzzle

Purchased from Puzzles and Brain teasers EBay Store 2007.
(wood dowel and 6 wood pieces with dowels, 2.75 inches;
shown on Page 70 of Coffin's Book on Polyhedral Dissections)

Six wood pieces with pegs and a key peg (the key peg has a little pin to make friction so it does not fall out of the solved puzzle). Here are solution steps:




--- 470 ---
Wood Star

Purchased 2006.
(Walnut and Oak, 8 pieces, 5 inches by 3/4 inches thick)

Assemble three pairs and then push together simultaneously:


--- 471 ---
Saturn Ring

Purchased from Mr. Puzzle Australia 2006.
(wood, 11/16" cubes, 2.75" x 3.5" x 2" when assembled)

This puzzle is constructed like Kev's Cubes. Here, 31 wood pieces (30 unit sized cubes and one 1x1x2 piece) are connected by an elastic cord, and must be manipulated into the shape shown in the photo above.


--- 472 ---
Rubik's Snake

Circa 1980's.
(plastic, 4 inches as assembled above)

A sequence of linked plastic pieces that can an be folded into fun shapes. The "solved" position is a 3D diamond shape shown above that fits into the plastic ball in which the puzzle was sold.

Further Reading
Rubik's Snake Booklet, from: http://www.rubiks.com/World/~/media/Files/hint_snake.ashx
McFArren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/snake2d.htm
McFarren's 3D Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/snake3d.htm
Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubik's_Snake

--- 473 ---
Yin And Yang

Sold by Bits and Pieces 2007.
(aluminum, 4 pieces, 2.5 inches)

Four aluminum pieces fit together; here are four basic solution steps:
Step 1: Identify the two pairs:
Step 2: Put the left pair together:
Step 3: Add the third piece:
Step 4: Slip on the fourth piece:

--- 474 ---
Wooden-Do-It


a.k.a. Cigar Puzzle
Garner Products, New York; this one for sale in 1950's.
(wood pieces on metal spindle, 5.2" long x 3/4" diameter)

This puzzle was purchased from a seller who said that it came from residual stock of Glenn's Novelty Shop, 16th and Market St., Philadelphia, where his father worked when the shop closed shop in 1959. Subsequently I received an email from Michel van Ipenburg, a puzzle collector, who kindly shared the image of the directions to this puzzle that are shown on the following page. The directions list objects to make from the pieces, including:


Chinese
Lantern

Knife
Grinder

HotWater
Bottle

Fire
Siren

Hitching
Post

Urn On
Pedestal

--- 475 ---
Wooden-Do-It Directions

--- 476 ---
Gumball Keychains

Circa 1960's.
(plastic, 2.75")
These keychains, barely a puzzle, became popular in the 1960's and have been made over the years for numerous objects, animals, shapes, etc. over the years. Here are three more examples and the directions that came with them:



(1.75" high)


(1.8" long)


(1.75" high)

--- 477 ---
Hartley's Humpty Dumpty


Circa 1950's.
(plastic, 3.25" high by 2.25" diameter)

--- 478 ---
Almost Impossible Heart



Fabricated on a 3D printer by L. Milekic 2016,
from a 3D print design by G. Frost,
posted in 2012 on the web page http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:26334.

(PLA plastic, 2" x 2" x 1.5" thick)

The two white pieces are the same shape but are not quite the same dimensions. Similarly, for the two dark pieces (that are symmetric to the white pieces). So first match each white with its corresponding dark piece. The two white pieces slide together on one plane and the two dark pieces slide together on a perpendicular plane. Start by putting three together and see how the fourth fits in. Then spread them all apart just right with the fourth piece now in position, and push together with simultaneous movement. Takes a bit of dexterity.

--- 479 ---
Rubik's Cube Etc.

The great thing about the classic Rubik's Cube is that you don't have a bag of pieces when it is unsolved. Keep it on a coffee table, pick it up, play with it, and put it down when get tired. The original 3x3x3 Rubik's cube started an entire class of manipulation puzzles.

--- 480 ---
Rubik's 2x2x2 Pocket Cube

First patented by Rubik 1983, other patents cover different internal mechanisms.
(plastic, 1.5 inches)

Rubik 2x2x2 Three Step Solution

Notation: L (left), R (right), F (front), B (back), U (up), and D (down) for 90 degree clockwise rotations of that face, - means counterclockwise. Corners are named with three letters.

1. Solve the down layer.

2. Put the up layer corners in correct locations (but possibly rotated incorrectly):
Use the following sequence exchange two corners:

FLU <-> FRU:   ( F   U )   (F-   U-)   (L-   U-   L)

Note: A quick way to do UBL <-> UFR is to precede this by L and skip the final L.
3. Fix the up layer so all corners are rotated correctly:
Position the cube so the up front right corner is not correct and repeat these two steps until all up corners are correct:
  1. Repeat until the up front right corner is correct:

    (R- D-)   (R   D)

  2. Rotate the up layer so the up front right corner is not correct.

Note: During Step 3, the down layer will be mixed up, but it will become correct again at the end. Be sure to do all four moves of Step 3A each time; it is easy to forget the final D when you see the correct color on top.

--- 481 ---
Notes About The Rubik 2x2x2 Three Step Solution

Step 1: Get three corners right, move two of the correct ones 90 degrees, move the fourth into position, and move the two correct ones back. If the 4th corner is rotated so it won't position correctly, do a full 180 degree turn of that side and then you can reposition it to try again. In any case, even if this description is hard to follow, after playing a bit, this step becomes easy.

Step 2 - an easier but slower solution: This step could be replaced by:
Step 2. If possible, rotate the up layer to be correct, except some corners may by be rotated; otherwise, mix up and go back to Step 1 using a different color on the bottom.

(Starting from a random position, there is a 1 in 6 chance that this test succeeds. So even if a quick mix and starting with a different bottom is not completely random, once you get reasonably fast at doing Step 1, it shouldn't take too long.)
Step 2 - making it faster: This step can be used three times for a diagonal exchange. However, since it does not change the upper back left corner, it is faster to do UBL <-> UFR by preceding the transformation with L and skipping the final L.

Step 3 - making it faster: Every iteration of the corner rotator exchanges UFR and DFR, and repeating it 6 times returns the cube to exactly where it was. Step 6A will use the corner rotator 2 times if the top color is on the right side of the UFR corner, but 4 times if it is on the front, in which case it is faster to do the reverse sequence 2 times:
reverse corner rotator:   D- R- D R
Step 3 - why it works:

--- 482 ---
Rubik's 2x2x2 - A Slow But Easy Randomized Solution


Step 1. Solve the down layer.

Step 2. If possible, rotate the up layer to be correct, except some corners may by be rotated; otherwise, mix up and go back to Step 1 using a different color on the bottom.

Step 3. Fix the up layer so all corners are rotated correctly:
Reposition the cube so the up front right corner is not correct, and repeat these two steps until all up corners are correct:
  1. Repeat until the up front right corner has the correct color on top:

    (R- D-)   (R   D)

    Where R and D mean to rotate the right and down layers 90 degrees clockwise, or R- and D- mean to rotate the right and down layers counterclockwise.

  2. Rotate the top layer 90 degrees counterclockwise.

--- 483 ---
Rubik 2x2x2 Three Step Solution - Another Way Do Step 2
The randomized solution described on the previous page, that simply hopes for the 1 in 6 chance to skip Step 2, can be a bit unsatisfying. It's not hard to learn the sequence of Step 2, but it is interesting to note that you don't have to. Instead, we can borrow the sequence from Step 3A, which we call S, and its reverse S-:
S   =   (R- D-)   (R   D)

S   =   (D- R-)   (D   R)
Consider interleaving a do-nothing sequence of U's into a do-nothing sequence of S's:



Here is how this sequence cycles three corners A,C,D on the top layer (and the cube is returned to where it was if you do it three times), or if it is followed by a U, it exchanges two corners B and C on the top layer (X denotes the corner below A at the start):



Although the sequence is relatively long when each S is expanded to the corresponding four moves, once you understand how S works, it is easy to remember this alternate Step 2:
2 (alternate). Fix the up layer so all corners are rotated correctly:
Let S be the sequence of Step 3A. Below is S S S- S- interleaved with U U U2; use it to keep the up left front corner and cycle the others, or to exchange the two up left corners, follow it with a U:
S   U   S   U   S-   U2   S-

--- 484 ---
Another 3-Step Solution
The booklet that comes with the Homer Simpson version describes a three step solution using these sequences:



WWith the notation from the preceding page (where 2 means do it twice), these transformations can be expressed as:

Step 2:
FRD <-> BLD:   F   L   D   L-   D-   F-   D-     ("diagonal swapper")

FRD -> BLD -> BRD -> FRD:   B   L   D   L-   B-   L   D-   L-   ("shunter")
Step 3:
FRD-, BRD-, BLD-:   R-   D-   R   D-   R-   D2   R   D2   ("shifter")

--- 485 ---
Other Sequences For Faster Solutions
The 3-step solutions presented on the preceding pages employ transformations that may have to be used several times. Jaap's Page presents a solution that uses fewer moves by employing a different transformation for each of the possible situations that may occur.

Notation: R (right), F (front), and D (down) for 90 degree clockwise rotations of those faces, and - for counterclockwise instead of clockwise. A 2 means do it twice. Corners are denoted with three letters (e.g., BLD = back left down corner).

Sequences for exchanging corners:
FLD <-> FRD: F D F- D- R- D- R
FRD <-> BRD: R F D F- D- R- D-
(Jaap's page does FRD <-> BLD: F- R- D- R D F D- )
Sequences for rotating corners (+ / - denote clockwise or counter clockwise):
FLD-, BLD+: R- D- R F- D R- D R D2 F2
FLD+, BLD-: F2 D2 R- D- R D- F R- D R
FLD-, BRD+: R2 D- R D2 R- D2 R D- R2 D
FRD-, BRD-, BLD-: R- D- R D- R- D2 R D2
FRD+, BRD+, BLD+: D2 R- D2 R D R- D R
FRD-, BRD+, BLD-, FLD+: R2 D2 R D2 R2 D
FRD+, BRD-, BLD-, FLD+: R D F R2 D2 F2 D F- D R2
These transformations are done from the point of view of the top layer solved and then solving the bottom layer, because it makes the puzzle easier to hold with the left hand and manipulate with the right hand (no moves of the up, left, or back layers needed).

Jaap's Page presents the above transformations along with many more, including transformations to make specific patterns.

--- 486 ---
Rubik's 2x2x2 - 25 Years Later

Plastic, stickerless, made in China, purchased from Amazon.com in 2015.
(DaYan, sold by Maxin, comes in a fitted box, 1.8" square)

In the early 2000's, smoother working versions of Rubik's 2x2x2 were widely available, with screws / springs for adjustable tension and smooth turning even when layers are not exactly aligned (beveled interior corners in conjunction with the spring action give a minimal degree of automatic alignment). Even dimension Rubik cubes, of which the 2x2x2 is the smallest, don't use a central axis like standard odd dimension designs such like the Rubik's 3x3x3 cube. Here are photos of the one shown above apart:



--- 487 ---
Rubik's 2x2x2 Star Wars
The Darth Maul figure is large (4 inches high) with a smooth mechanism. The others are small (between 2.25 and 2.5 inches high) from Kellogg's cereal boxes in the 2002 time frame; each has two related star wars episode II figures, one on each side.


Darth Maul

Darth Vader / Anikin Skywalker

Obiwan Young / Obiwan Older

Lea / Amidala

Dooku / Emperor

Trooper / Jango

R2D2 - C3PO

--- 488 ---
Rubik's 2x2x2 Cartoon Characters

Mickey Mouse
(Disney, Spain,
circa 1990?, 5",
sold by Mefferts 2006)

Donald Duck
(Disney, Spain,
circa 1990?, 4")

Bugs Bunny
(Warner Brothers,
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 3.5")

Scooby Doo
(Warner Brothers,
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 3.75")

Batman
(Warner Brothers
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 3.75")

Joker
(Warner Brothers
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 4")

Tom
(Warner Brothers,
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 3")

Jerry
(Warner Brothers,
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 3")

Tasmanian Devil
(Warner Brothers,
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 3.25")

Tweety
(Warner Brothers,
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 2.75")

Mars Marvin
(Warner Brothers,
1999, PUZZLE
HEADZ LTD, 3.25")

Hanshin Tigers Baseball
(circa 2000, 3")

Homer Simpson
(circa 2000, 5")

Bart Simpson
(circa 2000, 4.5")
  
Dog, Kitty, Penguin
(China, 2006, all three are 4.25")

--- 489 ---
Rubik's 2x2x2 Other Versions

Rubik's Pocket Cube (1980's, 1.5")

Large Size (2006, 2")

Tiny Size (2006, 1")

Keychain (2007, 1")

2007 Calendar Cube (2")

Rubik's Junior (2006, 1.5")

Popeye (1980's, 2.2")

Smaller Popeye (1980's, 2")

Harry Potter (circa 2000, 2.25")

Australian Road SIgns (circa 2000, 2.25")

--- 490 ---
Further Reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube2.htm
Rubiks.com booklet, from: http://www.rubiks.com/World/Rubiks%20downloads.aspx
Rubiks.com assembly diagram, from: http://www.rubiks.com/World/Rubiks%20downloads.aspx
Rubik Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,378,117
Li Patent, (Eastsheen Mechanism), from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 5,826,871
Patermann EP Patent (Mickey Mouse), EP712,649.
Khoudry International Patent (K-Ball), IP25874.
Kremmer Patent (Darth Maul), from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 6,217,023
Nicholas Patent (uses magnets), from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 3,655,201

--- 491 ---
Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube
SOLUTION - click here for all you need to know!


Patent filed by Erno Rubik 1975, sold by Ideal Toys in the 1980's.
(plastic with colored stickers, 2.2"; keychain 1.2")

The original twisty cube. Difficult, but fun to play with. One can rest at any time and pick it up later. The first puzzle of this type in a large class of puzzles in the years to follow. A number of ways to construct this puzzle have been devised over the years; here are the pieces of an original Rubik's Cube like shown above, where there is a central axis assembly and 20 pieces that interlock with it.


--- 492 ---
Rubik's 3x3x3 Six Step Solution
Notation: L (left), R (right), F (front), B (back), U (up), D (down) for 90 degree cockwise rotation of those faces; - means counterclockwise and 2 means do it twice. Corners are named with three letters and edges are named with two letters (e.g., FR means looking at the front, it is the edge on the right).
  1. Solve the top layer (all of it, including the sides), and turn the cube over so now it the bottom layer and the bottom third of the cube is solved (easy with a little practice).

  2. Solve the middle layer:
    Rotate the middle so centers are correct, and then use the edge mover sequence to move edges between the up and middle layers until the middle is solved; if an edge first needs to be flipped, move it be FU and do the edge flipper sequence of Step 3 (the edge will end up flipped at position UR, and you can rotate the top to move it back to FU).
    edge mover, FU -> FR:   (U R) (U- R-) , (U- F-) (U F)
  3. Flip the up edges so they all have the correct color on top:
    If no up edges have correct top color, first do the edge flipper. Now position the cube so UL has correct top color and UF does not, and do the edge flipper at most two times.
    edge flipper:   F   (R U) (R- U-)   F-
  4. Move the up layer edges to their correct positions:
    As needed, re-position the cube and use the edge swapper sequence.
    edge swapper, UF<->UL:   (R U)   (R- U)   (R U2)   (R- U)
  5. Position the up layer corners:
    The corner cycle sequence leaves UFR alone and cycles the other three counterclockwise. Identify one corner that is correct (but may be rotated), or if there is not one, do the corner cycle. Then re-position the cube so the correct corner is UFR, and then do the corner cycle one or two times to make all corners correct.
    corner cycle:   (U R)   (U- L- )   (U R-)   (U- L)
  6. Rotate the up layer corners:
    *** Don't worry that the bottom appears mixed up as you do this, it will be ok in the end.
    Position the cube so UFR is not correct and repeat these two steps until all corners correct:

    1. Repeat the corner rotator until the UFR corner is correct:

      corner rotator:   R- D- R D

    2. Rotate the up layer (not the whole cube) so that UFR is incorrect.

--- 493 ---
Remembering The Basic Rubik 3x3x3 Six Step Solution

Each sequence has a natural rhythm, but an easy mistake is to start off wrong. The Edge Mover and Corner Cycle start with U, the Edge Flipper (after parking the F) and the Edge Swapper start with R. To avoid forgetting your place, run the sequence in your head, or simply count 1,2,3,4,... as you go; two sets of 4 for the edge mover, 4 between the F's of the edge flipper, etc.

Edge Mover (for Step 2):
edge mover, FU -> FR:   (U R) (U- R-) , (U- F-) (U F)

Mixes the up layer but leaves the lower two layers unchanged except replaces FR with FU. Think of it as two pairs, the first starts with UR, and the second with U-F-.
Edge Flipper (for Steps 2 and 3):
edge flipper:   F   (R U) (R- U-)   F-

Mixes the up layer and flips UF (leaving it in the UR position). Repeat at most three times to make all up edges have correct top color; if at least one up edge is correct already, start with the cube positioned so that UL is correct. Think of this as "parking" the front with F, doing (RU) (R-U), and then "unparking" the front with F-.
Edge Swapper (for Step 4):
edge swapper, UF<->UL:   (R U)   (R- U)   (R U2)   (R- U)

It's R R- R R- interleaved with U U U2 U. Starts with R, the R's alternate + and -, and the U's keep going clockwise, where the third is 180 degrees.
Corner Cycle (for Step 5):
corner cycle:   (U R)   (U- L- )   (U R-)   (U- L)

It's U U- U U- interleaved with R L- R- L. Starts with U, the U's alternate + and -, and remember that R and L- come first, and the next two must be R- and L.
Corner Rotator (for Step 6):
corner rotator:   R- D- R D

Exchanges UFR and DFR; repeat 6 times to restore the cube. Step 6A does it 2 or 4 times. Also exchanges DBL and DBR; cube is mixed during Step 6, but lower layers will be solved again once the up layer is. Always complete the sequence before doing Step 6B; it is easy to forget the final D when you see the correct color on top.

--- 494 ---
Speeding Up the Basic Rubik 3x3x3 Six Step Solution

The basic six step solution is not the fastest for speed cubing, but it can be fun to do it faster:

Step 1: Solve the up layer and turn the cube over for the remaining steps. If needed, move the solved portion out of the way, flip a piece, put it into position, and rotate the solved portion back. To help with quickly locating pieces, pick a color for the first face that works best for you.

Step 2: Instead of using the edge flipper, learn the symmetric sequence that moves an edge down counterclockwise from up to middle:
edge cc-mover, UF -> MLF:   (U- L-) (U L) , (U F) (U- F-)
Step 3: Before the final F-, if the right side of FR is not the top color, instead of wasting time to do F- F, repeat the (R U) (R- U-) before doing F-.

Step 4: Do nothing if all edges are correct, or the standard Edge Swapper if just two adjacent edges need to be swapped. Otherwise, because omitting the last move of the Edge Swapper leaves UF unchanged and cycles the other three counterclockwise, start by rotating the top to make UF correct. If UB is also correct (but UL and UR are reversed), do the first 7 Edge Swapper moves and then swap UL and UB. The other case is that UL,UB, UR need to be cycled; do the first 7 moves to cycle them counterclockwise. For clockwise, do the first 7 moves twice, or it is faster to reverse the 7 moves (easy to remember as the same R R- R R- but interleaved with U2 U- U-. instead of U U U2):
clockwise cycle UL, UB, UR:   (R U2)   (R- U-)   (R U-)   R-
Step 5: If no corners are correct, learn how to tell for which orientation of the cube the corner cycle will leave things so that a counterclockwise cycle will be needed. Or, if you have identified a correct corner and a clockwise cycle of the other three is needed, instead of doing the corner cycle twice (three times returns the cube to where it was), save time by reversing the sequence:
reverse corner cycle:   (L- U)   (R U- )   (L U)   (R- U-)
Step 6: Every iteration of the corner rotator exchanges UFR and DFR, and repeating it 6 times returns the cube to where it was. Step 6A will use the corner rotator 2 times if the top color is on the right side of the UFR corner, or 4 times if it is on the front, in which case it is faster to do the reverse sequence 2 times (easy, start with D- instead of R- and everything follows):
reverse corner rotator:   D- R- D R

--- 495 ---
The Corner Rotator - Why Step 6 Works
Step 6 is the same as Step 3 of the solution presented for Rubik's 2x2x2; we repeat the explanation given there for why it works:
More About The Corner Rotator
It is interesting to see that the Corner Rotator can be used for Step 5, by memorizing two "do simple nothing" sequences:

5 (alternate). Position the up layer corners:
Let S be the sequence of Step 6A, and let X be the sequence S S S- S- (which does nothing) interleaved with rotating the up layer 360 degrees with U U U2:
alternate corner cycle:   Z   =   S   U   S   U   S-   U2   S-
Z does a counterclockwise cycle of UFR, UBR, UBL; repeat it until at least one up corner is correct (but may be rotated), re-position the cube so this corner is UFL, and then continue repeating it until all up corners are in their correct positions.
Although this sequence is relatively long after expanding each S to the corresponding four moves, it is relatively easy to remember as the interleaving of two do-nothing sequences. In addition, if you forget what it does, a pencil and paper can be used to draw what happens to the up layer; see the explanation and diagrams presented for the Rubik's 2x2x2 Rubik 2x2x2 alternate solution.

--- 496 ---
Solving Rubik's 2x2x2 With 3x3x3 Sequences
A completely solved 3x3x3 cube except for two adjacent corners exchanged is not possible due to parity considerations; that is, if just two adjacent corners are interchanged, then it must be that the edges are not completely solved. However, this is possible for the Rubik's 2x2x2 cube.

If you are fast with the Step 5 corner cycle sequence, and don't want to bother remembering the sequence to exchange two corners of a 2x2x2 cube (which corrupts edges when used with the 3x3x3 cube), Steps 1, 5, and 6 will solve the 2x2x2 cube, by using the corner cycle appropriately for Step 5:



The single swap is all that is needed, since it can be used 3 times for a diagonal swap and twice for a double swap. However, by using all three variations shown above, it is at most 9 moves for a single swap (8 moves for the corner cycle plus the final U) or 16 moves for the diagonal or double swap. Note each time a corner sequence or reverse corner sequence is done, the cube first needs to be repositioned so that the corner that does not move is in the UFR position. If you don't want to remember the reverse corner cycle, the second sequence of the double swap can be a standard corner cycle on D,B,A followed by a U2; however, counting that final U2 as two moves, it is no fewer moves than doing two single swaps.

--- 497 ---
A Corners-First Rubik's 3x3x3 Solution
Here is a different approach that starts with solving the corners, then the top and bottom edges, and finally the middle edges.

Notation: L (left), R (right), F (front), B (back), U (up), D (down) for 90 degree cockwise rotation of those faces; - means counterclockwise and 2 means do it twice. Corners are named with three letters and edges are named with two letters (e.g., FR means looking at the front, it is the edge on the right).

1. Solve the corners using a solution for Rubik's 2x2x2.

2. Position up and down edges by moving to and from the middle layer:
  1. Cycle edges between the middle and up layers to get three top edges correct:

    RB -> FU, FU -> FD, FD -> RB:   F M F-

    That is, repeatedly position the cube so that the edge to be moved is RB, rotate the U layer so that where you want to move it to is FU, and cycle.

  2. Turn the cube over, and repeat Step A.

  3. Move the edge that goes to FD to the FU position; then move final edge to FU.
3. Use this to flip up and down edges:
Flip the UF edge:   F-   M   (F M)2   F-
4. Use rotations of the middle layer and these to position middle edges:
Front back swap, LF <-> LB, RF <-> RB:   (R2 M2)2
Clockwise cycle, RF -> LB -> RB -> RF:   R2 M R2 M-
5. Use this to flip middle edges (for right to left diagonal, do B2 before and after):
Flip MRF and MRB:   (R M-)3   R   M2   R   (M- R)3

--- 498 ---
Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube - 25 Years Later
     
Plastic, stickerless, made in China, purchased from Amazon.com in 2015.
(left: Newisland, sold by YaMiYo, comes in a with a storage bag, 3.25" square;
right: DaYan, sold by Maxin, comes in a fitted box, 2.3" square)

In the early 2000's, smoother working versions of Rubik's 3x3x3 were widely available, with screws / springs for adjustable tension and smooth turning even when layers are not exactly aligned (beveled interior corners in conjunction with the spring action give a minimal degree of automatic alignment). The Newisland cube shown above was a gift from a friend who does speed cubing; it is smooth and quiet, comes with a storage bag and directions, and its literature explains PA plastic lower resistance, anti-popping, and internal construction. The less expensive Da Yan cube shown above has different but similar construction; here are photos of it apart:



--- 499 ---
Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube - 25 Years Later

25th Anniversary Cube, 2.2"

Gold Cube, 2.2"

all plastic with no stickers, 2.2"

large all plastic with no stickers, 3.5"

Large Dice Cube, 3.5"

Large Alphabet Cube, 3.5"

White Maze Cube, 2.2"

Yellow Maze Cube, 2.2"

Sudoku Cube, 2.2"

Red Sudoku Cube, 2.2"

--- 500 ---
Rubik's 3x3x3 Other Versions Continued

McDonalds, 2.2"

Chex Cereal, 2.2"

Jack Daniels, 2.2"

UPS, 2.2"

Mickey Mouse, 2.2"

MatLab, 2.2"

Small Cube, 1.2"

Small Shiny Cube, 1.2"

Dice made by Volker (Germany), 2.2"

Assembly Cube, 2.2"

--- 501 ---
Some Other Rubik 3x3x3 Solutions (In Alphabetical Order)

Beust's Page, from: http://beust.com/rubik
Bieber's Page, from: http://www.ronaldbieber.de/Fun/Rubik
Chess And Poker Page, from: http://www.chessandpoker.com/rubiks-cube-solution.html
Cheyer's Page, from: http://www.ai.sri.com/~cheyer/rubiks/rubiks.html
Dedmore's Page, from: http://www.helm.lu/cube/solutions/rubikscube
Dry Erase Board Page, from: http://www.thedryeraseboard.com
Fridrich's Page, from: http://ws2.binghamton.edu/fridrich/cube.html
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube3.htm
Jasmine Page, from: http://peter.stillhq.com/jasmine/rubikscubesolution.html
Jeays' Page, from: http://jeays.net/rubiks.htm
JJuergen's Page, from: http://www.mathematische-basteleien.de
Marshall's Page, from: http://helm.lu/cube/MarshallPhilipp
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/rc/RubCub0.htm
Monroe's Page, from: http://www.alchemistmatt.com/cube/rubik.html
Nerd Paradise Page, from: http://www.nerdparadise.com/puzzles/333
Olefsky Puzzle Solver Page, from: http://www.puzzlesolver.com
Ortega and Jelinek Corners First Solution Page, from: http://rubikscube.info/ortega.php
Oxford ComLab Text Solution, from: ftp.comlab.ox.ac.uk
Petrus' Page, from: http://lar5.com/cube
Rob's Rubik Repair Page, from: http://www.roobik.com/cgi-bin/rubix/rubix.cgi
Rubiks.com Solution, from: http://www.rubiks.com
Scared Cat Page, from: http://www.scaredcat.demon.co.uk/rubikscube/the_solution.html
Shengshou Speed Cube Solution, from: http://www.speedsolving.com/wiki/index.php/Shengshou
Shon's Rubik's Place Page, from: http://www.rubiksplace.com
Still's Page, from: http://peter.stillhq.com/jasmine/rubikscubesolution.html
You Rubik Page, from: http://www.yourubik.com
WikiHow Page, from: http://www.wikihow.com/Solve-a-Rubik's-Cube-(Easy-Move-Notation)

--- 502 ---
Some Rubik 3x3x3 Patents
Rubik Hungarian Patent, BE887875.
Rubik U.S. Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,378,116
Sugden Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 6,974,130
Sugden Design Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. D495,378
Scott Patent Application, from: www.uspto.gov - application no. 2010/0230897

Further Reading
God's Number is 20, from: http://www.cube20.org
Kociemba's Two Phase Algorithm and Cube Math, from: http://kociemba.org/cube.htm
22 Moves, from: http://www.springerlink.com/content/q088143tn805k124/fulltext.pdf
Speed Solving Page, from: http://www.speedsolving.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
Superflip, from: http://www.speedsolving.com/wiki/index.php/Superflip
Rubiks.com Page, from: http://www.rubiks.com
Rubiks.com Booklet, from: http://www.rubiks.com
Rubiks.com Diagrams, from: http://www.rubiks.com
Rubiks Cube Typesetting with TeX, from: http://www.ctan.org/pkg/rubik
Cube Lovers Archive, from: http://www.math.rwth-aachen.de/~Martin.Schoenert/Cube-Lovers
Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubik%27s_cube
Wikipedia - God's Algorithm, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God%27s_algorithm
Wikipedia - solutions, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optimal_solutions_for_Rubik's_Cube

--- 503 ---
Rubik1x2x2

Made by SOCUBE, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 2009.
(plastic, 2.1 x 2.1 x 1 inch;
white opposite yellow, red opposite orange, blue opposite green)


Availabe at McDonalds in the U.K. 2002.
(plastic, 3.5 inches)

A very easy (but cute) puzzle.

Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/morph.htm

--- 504 ---
Rubik 1x2x5

Purchased 2012.
(plastic, 3.9" x 1.5" x 3/4" inches)

A mechanically fun and not too hard puzzle, although the graphics can make it confusing to look at it mixed up and determine what needs to be done. Jaap's Page presents a solution that first solves the edges and then the corners.


Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/index.htm

--- 505 ---
Rubik 1x2x9


Rubik 1x2x9 "Chopsticks",
designed by Oskar Van Deventer and Ola Jansson, sold by Mefferts 2013.

(plastic, 5+1/8" x 1+7/8" x 1+3/8")

A longer puzzle in the theme of Rubik 1x2x5. Shown above is the puzzle and it turned over.

--- 506 ---
Rubik 1x2x13

a.k.a. Unlucky Twist
Designed and custom made by Oskar Van Deventer, 2013.
(plastic, made with a 3D printer, 10.25" x 1.5" x 3/4")

A larger version of the mass produced Rubik 1x2x9. Here are photos of successive manipulations, where the third photo is a close up of the center of the second one to see how the mechanics of how the layers build out from the middle cube:





--- 507 ---
Rubik 1x3x3 Floppy Cube

Designed by Katsuhiko Okamoto 2007, purchased from Gentosha, Japan, 2009.
(plastic, 2.25 by 2.25 by 3/4 inches;
by the same designer as the Rubik 3x3x3 Void Cube)

Seems to impossibly stay together as sets of three are flipped:


Notation: L (left), R (right), F (front), B (back) denote flip that side.

Jaap's Page presents a computer analysis that shows there are only 192 reachable positions, each requiring at most 8 moves to solve. By just playing with this puzzle it usually does not take very long to solve, or to get it to where it can be fixed with the following simple transformation:
F R   F R   F R
(flip two adjacent edges)

The directions that came with the puzzle also present the following transformations (after doing the last two, rotate or turn the puzzle over to get the views shown):

L F L   R B R
(flip two opposite edges)

L F L   R F R
(exchange opposite edges)

F L R B
(flip center and
exchange two opposite edges)
Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/floppy.htm

--- 508 ---
Rubik1x3x3 Floppy Mirror Cube

a.k.a. Magic Floppy Cube
Made in Hong Kong, 2009.
(plastic, 2.25 by 2.25 by 3/4 inches)

A version of the Rubik 1x3x3 Floppy Cube where the cube sizes progress from small to large in both horizontal dimensions; it can be solved in exactly the same way. Fun shapes can be formed:



Unlike the Rubik 3x3x3 Mirror Cube which progresses in all three dimensions, here all cubes have the same thickness and not all unsolved positions have a jumbled shape. In fact, because for this puzzle it is very easy to get back to the square shape, it is perhaps even easier to solve than the normal floppy cube. By randomly mixing and restoring to a square the puzzle is typically quickly solved or in a position where two adjacent edges are flipped, which can easily be fixed with the following transformation (F and R denote flips of the front and right sides, 3 means do it three times):


(F R)3

--- 509 ---
Rubik1x3x3 Scramble Cube

Designed by Katsuhiko Okamoto, made by Gentosha, Japan, 2010.
(plastic, 2.25 by 2.25 by 3/4 inches)

A generalization of the Rubik 1x3x3 Floppy Cube Rubik 1x3x3 Floppy Cube where a 1x1x2 portion can rotate (see also the Rubik 1x3x3 Floppy Mirror Cube); here are a sequence of three moves to make an edge piece sit up:



Jaap's Page presents an analysis, but by just playing it is relative easy to solve, and it is easy to make interesting shapes, like the one on the left below, and then return the puzzle to flat.



Notation: L (left), R (right), F (front), B (back) denote flip that side, L90 to turn the left side 90 degrees clockwise, B90 to turn the back side 90 degrees clockwise.

Once flat, moves for the 1x3x3 Floppy Cube can be used to solve or to be left with one edge flipped as shown on the right above. To fix this, make the edge opposite to this edge sit up, then use the edge pair flipping transformation from the 1x3x3 Floppy Cube (LFL RBR), and then put the opposite edge back down; all 90 rotations are in pairs, so all movement can be clockwise:
L90 B90 L90   L F L   R B R   L90 B90 L90

Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/floppy2.htm

--- 510 ---
Rubik 2x2x2 Bandaged

Made by J. A. Storer from a standard Rubik 2x2x2 cube, 2007.
(two brass plates glued to a Meffert's Eastsheen Rubik 2x2x2 cube, 2 inches)

This is a relatively easy puzzle that can usually be solved without too much effort by playing a bit. However, it can get more mixed up than is first apparent. An organized way of solving is to combine repositioning of the bandaged portion with transformations for the standard Rubik's 2x2x2 cube that only use R and D rotations, such as these which are shown on Jaap's Page.

Notation: R (right) and D (down) for 90 degree clockwise rotations of the corresponding faces, - to do counterclockwise instead of clockwise, and 2 to do it twice; corners are denoted with three letters (e.g., FLD- = counterclockwise rotation of the front, left, down corner).
FLD-, BRD+: R2 D- R D2 R- D2 R D- R2 D

FRD-, BRD-, BLD-: R- D- R D- R- D2 R D2

FRD+, BRD+, BLD+: D2 R- D2 R D R- D R

FRD-, BRD+, BLD-, FLD+: R2 D2 R D2 R2 D

Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube2.htm

--- 511 ---
Rubik 2x2x2 Double Bandaged

Made by J. A. Storer from a standard Rubik 2x2x2 cube, 2007.
(four brass plates glued to a Meffert's Eastsheen Rubik 2x2x2 cube, 2 inches)

This is an easy puzzle, but still fun, that can be solved without too much effort by playing a bit.

--- 512 ---
Rubik 2x2x2 Nested

a.k.a. Rubik 2x2x2 Super Square
Made in China, 2010.
(plastic, 2.2 inches)

Works like a Rubik 2x2x2, and also each face has a circle that rotates. So this puzzle is a bit like a 2x2x2 nested inside a standard 2x2x2 cube.

--- 513 ---
Rubik 2x2x2 Cubes Fused



Two, three, or four Rubik's 2x2x2 cubes joined, purchased from UK3 2005.
(plastic, each formed from 7/8 inch 2x2x2 cubes inches)

--- 514 ---
Rubik 2x2x3 Tower Cube

a.k.a. Slim Tower, Franken Tower
Made by Gentosha, Japan, 2009.
(plastic, 1.5 x 1.5 x 2.25 inches,
opposite red is yellow, opposite blue is light green, and opposite gray is black)

An extended Rubik's 2x2x2 where two dimensions are restricted to 180 degree rotations.

Notation: With a 2x3 surface facing you, F (front), B (back), U (up), and D (down) denote 180 degree clockwise rotations of the corresponding faces, L (left) and R (right) denote a 90 degree clockwise rotation of the corresponding faces, - to rotate counterclockwise instead of clockwise, 2 or 3 to do it two or three times.

Solution: The solution that comes with the puzzle gives the following transformations that may be used to solve the corners and edges independently.
Solve the corners using the following transformation as needed:
BRU <-> BRD:    U F R F    L- U L    U    R- U R
Solve the edges using the following transformation as needed:
UF <-> UB:    (U   R2)3

Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube223.htm
(Presents a similar approach with many additional transformations.)

--- 515 ---
Rubik 2x2x4 Tower

Made in Japan, purchased from Mefferts 2010.
(plastic, 1.7" x 1.7" x 3.4"
green opposite yellow, red opposite orange, white opposite blue)

Unlike Rubik 2x2x3, 90 degree turns on the long dimension can lead to jumbled shapes; here is a sequence of three 90 degree turns:



Solution

1. Return the puzzle to the correct shape.
One approach is to think of this as a 2x2x2 cube formed by the center portion with stuff hanging off of it, and employ Rubik 2x2x2 transformations.
2. Use a solution for Rubik 3x3x4.
(Steps to correct edge pieces can be omitted).

--- 516 ---
Rubik 2x2x4 Nested

a.k.a. Rubik 2x2x4 Super Square
Made in China, 2010.
(plastic, 2.2 inches)

The middle portion is just like a Rubik 2x2x2 Nested, (where each face has a circle that rotates), and then this puzzle has a standard layer added to the top and bottom.

--- 517 ---
Rubik 2x2x23


a.k.a. Overlap Cube
Designed by Oskar Van Deventer, purchased from Shapeways 2013.
(Lots of little uncolored plastic pieces in a 3.5" by 5.5" plastic bag;
buyer must color and assemble to have a puzzle as shown in the pictures above
from the Shapeways web page; good luck!)

--- 518 ---
Rubik's 2x3x3 Domino

Designed by Erno Rubik 1983; left purchased circa 1985; right purchased 2009.
(plastic, 1.5 inches high by 2.25 inches square)

Put the numbers in order on both sides.

Notation: R for a flip of the right side, U, D for clockwise rotations of the up and down faces (- for counterclockwise, and 2 to do it twice). We also use M to denote rotating the whole puzzle 90 degrees clockwise (with respect to looking down), as a convenience so that only right flips are needed (easier to hold and also useful for the solution to Rubik 3x3x4).

Move pieces to their correct layers:

1. Repeatedly position pairs of edges on the wrong layers on the right and do R.

2. Repeatedly position two corners on the wrong layers at the front right and do:
Exchange UFR and DFR:   R   U   R   U-   R
Solve the two layers independently:

3. Use this to permute corners; X = Step 2 transformation, Y = reverse of X:
Exchange URF and URB:   X   M-   Y   D-
4. Use this to permute edges:
Exchange UF and UR:   (R   U)2   (R   U2)2   X
Jaap's Page presents the transformations above (and others), as well as the following transformation to change a side to its mirror image (F denotes a front flip):
R F T- F T2 R (T F)2 T2 R T- F R
Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/domino.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/rdml/rubdom1.htm

--- 519 ---
Rubik2x3x3 Layered

Made in China, purchased 2010.
(plastic, 1.5 inches high by 2.5 inches diameter)

A smaller version of Rubik3x3x3 Layered and mechanically the same as Rubik2x3x3, but with each layer being a single color (and this version has been made in a circular shape).

Although any solution for Rubik's 2x3x3 could be used, the puzzle is much easier to solve. It is easy to flip the sides as needed to make the centers match the edges (i.e., each side has a cross of a single color). Then corners can be fixed with just 180 degree rotations of the front (F2) and clockwise or counter-clockwise rotations of the top (U, U-). If you want to memorize a simple transformation, this one exchanges the front top left corner with the front bottom left corner:
F2   U   F2   U-   F2
After the above transformation has been used to fix pairs of corners, such shown below on the left, a flip of the front and back sides followed by a flip of the left and right sides gives the checkerboard pattern shown below on the right.


--- 520 ---
Rubik 2x3x4

Made in China, 2012.
(plastic, 2.8" x 2.1" x 1.4" inches)

The shape can change quickly. Here are three successive moves; the first turns the back face 90 degrees clockwise, the second turns left and right two halves 180 degrees with respect to each other, and the third turns the front face 90 degrees counter clockwise:



Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube234.htm

--- 521 ---
Rubik 2x4x4

a.k.a. WitEden 2x4x4
Purchased from Mefferts, 2013.
(plastic, 2.7" x 2.7" x 1.75";
white opposite yellow, green opposite bule, orange opposite red)

The top and bottom layers can rotate 90 degrees; the other rotations are limited to 180 degrees.

--- 522 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Mirror Cube

a.k.a. Yong Jun Cube
Purchased from Yong Jun Toys / Mega House, 2009.
(plastic with silver stickers, 2.25 inches)

A version of the standard Rubik's 3x3x3 cube cube where the cube sizes progress from small to large in all three dimensions. Each piece is distinguished by its shape rather than it color. Here are photos of three successive moves:



Any solution for the standard Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube can be used, although it may be more confusing to identify each piece based on its shape when the puzzle is mixed up than it is to look at colors on a standard cube.

--- 523 ---
Rubik3x3x3 Square King

Designed by T. Fisher, purchased from Mefferts 2009.
(plastic, 2.2 inches;
silver opposite gold, green opposite blue, red opposite orange;
also made with a black body)

Works just like a a standard Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube, but can be confusing when the shape becomes very jumbled. Meffert's also made this puzzle in all silver and all gold, and versions from China were sold as the "Square King":



Here are photos of 4 consecutive moves:


--- 524 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Void Cube


a.k.a. Holey Cube
Designed by Katsuhiko Okamoto 2007,
top by Gentousha 2009 and uses stickers,
bottom two purchased from CubeFans 2009 and are all plastic.

(plastic, 2.25 inches;
top: gray opposite black, red opposite yellow, blue opposite light green;
bottom: green opposite blue, yellow opposite white, red opposite orange)

By the designer of the Rubik 1x3x3 Floppy Cube. Logically the same as the classic Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube, but mechanically very different. The standard Rubik's 3x3x3 cube relies on central 3D axes to which the centers are attached and the other pieces flow around. Here, one can look through the center of the cube along any of the three axes (i.e., a square bar with a 1x1 unit cross section can be passed through the cube in any of the three directions). Solving is the same as the standard version, except for the void cube parity issue, described on the following page.

--- 525 ---
Void Cube Parity Problem
In a standard Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube, not all possible positions are reachable by mixing up the puzzle. For example, it is not possible to end up with the cube solved, except for two adjacent corners exchanged. Note that this fact is not at odds with such a situation being possible for the Rubik's 2x2x2 Cube, which has no middle layers. For example, cycling the UFL, UBL, UBR corners counterclockwise followed by rotating the up layer 90 degrees clockwise results in the UFL and UBL corners being exchanged and the remainder of the 2x2x2 cube unchanged, but for the 3x3x3 cube this would leave the edges of the up layer disturbed.

The void cube parity problem is when the puzzle is almost solved in an apparently impossible position. For example, using the simple layer at a time solution, as was presented for the standard Rubik's 3x3x3 cube, you may get stuck at the end with something like this:



Such a configuration corresponds to a standard Rubik's 3x3xx3 cube where in addition to the two exchanged corners, some center squares are mixed up as well. Other solution approaches could result in impossible configurations of the edges. With the void cube, there are no middle tiles to get mixed up, and some impossible positions for the standard 3x3x3 cube are now possible.

Rather that mix up up the puzzle and try again, there are many ways that have been published for fixing the problem. But without having to remember something new, a simple approach is to try to solve using whatever method you use for the standard cube, and if it works fine (you lucked out and got the right mode of parity), and if not, go back to a place where you can make a move that will change parity with respect to the center squares and resolve from that point forward.

When using the basic 6-step layer by layer solution for Rubik's 3x3x3, one can just solve as usual, hoping things will work, and if not, rotate the middle layer 90 degrees, and then resolve from that point on.

When using a corners first solution, at the last phase that solves the middle, the same sequences can be used, possibly preceded with an additional 90 degree rotation of the middle layer.

--- 526 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Edges Only

a.k.a. Cornerless Void Cub
Left: made by Smaz Smart Toy Shop IQ Toys from a Gentosha Void Cube 2009.
right: mass produced by Cube For You (C4Y) 2009;

(plastic, 2.25 inches,
left: white opposite yellow, blue opposite green, orange opposite red,
right: blue opposite green, purple opposite red, and yellow opposite gray;
left looks nice, right has a smoother mechanism)

A simplified Void Cube that removes everything but the edges from a standard Rubik 3x3x3 Cube; complements the Rubik 2x2x2 Cube that removes everything but the corners.



The puzzle has exactly two solutions. To see this, observe that for each color there is exactly one other color for which it shares no edge, so this determines the pairs of colors that are opposite each other. Now choose two adjacent colors to make a standard orientation with one on the top and one on the front (for example, for the puzzle on the left above, blue on top and purple on front), which uniquely determines the bottom and back colors, and now it is possible to solve the puzzle with either choice for the left and right colors.

Although a solution for the void cube can be used here (omitting solving corners), shorter sequences can be employed because there is no need to avoid disturbing the corners when manipulating the edges.

--- 527 ---
Rubik's 3x3x3 Fourth Dimension

Rubik's 3x3x3 with graphics on the middle squares, produced in 1988.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

Many promotional versions of the standard Rubik's 3x3x3 cube have graphics printed on the faces that require the middle square to be properly oriented. Rubik's 3x3x3 Fourth dimension adds minimal graphics for this purpose. Here are the directions from from the box lid:



Some Rubik's solutions, such as Marshall's Page, employ transformations that preserve center orientations. For others the centers can be fixed at the end with simple moving around and rotating of the middles that does not affect the remainder of the puzzle. The Dry Erase Board Page gives the following idea:
0. Optional: Rotate an outside layer (or more than one if you want).
1. Rotate a middle layer.
2. Rotate a different middle layer.
3. Reverse step 1.
4. Reverse step 2.
5. Reverse step 0.
Jaap's Page gives specific transformations.

Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube3.htm
Dry Erase Board Page, from: http://www.thedryeraseboard.com/mechpuz/333/centersolve
Marshall's Page, from: http://helm.lu/cube/MarshallPhilipp/Rubikfourth.htm

--- 528 ---
Layered Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube

Custom made Rubik's 3x3x3, one color per layer, purchased 2006.
(plastic, 2.2 inches)

Mechanically the same as Rubik's 3x3x3, but with each layer being a single color. Although any solution for Rubik's 3x3x3 could be used, the puzzle is much easier to solve; the solution below is the same as that for the Rhombi Diamond.

Solution:

1. Solve the middle layer.
Easy if you don't care about the rest of the puzzle.
2. Solve the top and bottom edges.
Easy by using 180 degree front rotations to exchange incorrect edges.
3. Solve the bottom back right and bottom back left corners.
It is easy to play with top rotations and 180 degree front rotations to make at least one bottom corner red; rotate this corner to the bottom back right. If the bottom back left corner is green, play some more with these rotations to make the top front left and top front middle red, then rotate the front 180 degrees to bring these two red cubes down, and then rotate the bottom 90 degrees to bring the red corner to the back right (and making the red corner that was in the back right now in the back left).
4. Solve the remaining incorrect corners.
This can be done with just 180 degree rotations of the front (F2) and clockwise or counter-clockwise rotations of the top (U, U-). If you want to memorize a simple transformation, this one exchanges the front top left corner with the front bottom left corner:
F2   U   F2   U-   F2

--- 529 ---
Rubik's Perpetual Calendar

Ideal Toy Co., 1981.
(plastic 2.2 inches, with cardboard can with plastic lid)

A standard Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube for which each day of the year one can solve the top face to that day. It is much easier than the standard cube, since only one side has to be solved. For a given day, the top left and bottom right corners of the top face are blank, the top middle square has day, the top left has one of Sun, Mon, Tues, Wednes, Thurs, Fri, Satur, the middle three squares are the month, JAN, FEB, MAR, APR, MAY, JUN, JUL, SEP, NOV, DEC, and the bottom right two squares are the date (or just the bottom right if the date is only one digit).

Here is a Dutch version Here is a Dutch version solved for Monday, Jan 1 on the left, and on the right the other three sides for this solution (in Dutch, day=dag, Sunday through Saturday are Zondag, Maandag, Dinsdag, Woensdag, Donderdag, Vrijdag, Zaterdag, and January through December are Januari, Februari, Maart, April, Mei, Juni, Juli, Augustus, September, Oktober, November, December).


--- 530 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Bandaged

a.k.a. Bicube
Made by Mefferts, 2009.
(left: plastic 2.3 inches, red opposite white, yellow opposite orange, blue opposite green;
right: plastic 1+5/8", red opposite orange, green opposite blue, yellow opposite white)

The bandages restrict the way in which a Rubik's 3x3x3 cube can be mixed up, and the sequences to solve it are also restricted. Jaap's Page presents analysis and solution sequences. Here is what the other three sides look like:



Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/bandage.htm

--- 531 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Patched

a.k.a. Fused Cube
Made in China 2008.
(plastice, 2.2 inches)

In a theme similar to Rubik's 3x3x3 Bandaged, the "patches" restrict the way in which a Rubik's 3x3x3 cube can be mixed up, and the sequences to solve it are also restricted. Here is what the other three sides look like:


--- 532 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Brick

a.k.a. Brick Cube
Made by Hidetoshi Takeji, 2008.
(plastic, 2.2 inches)

This is a Rubik's 3x3x3 cube that has been patched in pairs along two of the three dimensions; to see this, rotate the middle section by 90 degrees:


Here is what the other three sides look like:

--- 533 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Latch Cube

Designed by Katsuhiko Okamoto, purchased in Japan, 2010.
(plastic, 2.2 inches square)

Like a standard Rubik 3x3x3 cube but movement is restricted so that a face may only turn in the direction of the arrows. When solved, all faces have consistent arrows and can rotate only in the indicated direction. When mixed up, some faces may have no arrows (and can rotate in either direction) and some faces may have arrows in both directions (and cannot be rotated in either direction). Here are box back and the other three sides:


--- 534 ---
Rubik 3x3x3 Constrained

a.k.a. TomZ Constrained Cube, Tom's Constrained Cube
Purchased from Mefferts, 2012.
(plastic 2.2" square;
TomZ Constrained Cube 90,
TomZ Constrained Cube 180,
TomZ Constrained Cube 270,
TomZ Constrained Cube Ultimate)

Locks in the center allow the corresponding face to only rotate a particular number of degrees. Below is a photo of the 180 degree cube, and also a photo of a second 180 degree cube which came with its blue face set to 90 degrees. The ultimate cube has a mixture of degrees on its faces, including 0 degrees.



Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/quarter.htm

--- 535 ---
Rubik 3x3x4

Made by Cube 4 You (C4U), 2009.
(plastic, 2.2 by 2.2 by 3 inches; white body has opposite sides white / blue, red / orange, green / yellow, the same as the color scheme as the standard Rubik's 3x3x3; black body has opposite sides black / white, red / yellow, green / blue)

This extension of the standard Rubik 3x3x3 cube allows only 180 degree rotations in two of the dimensions. One solution approach is to think of an "outer" Rubik 2x2x3 Domino formed by the top and bottom layers with an "inner" domino in the middle:

1. Solve the outer domino.

2. Solve the inner domino, except if your solution makes use of flips of the front, back, or left sides, replace each such flip by a flip of the right side (that is, rotate the middle layers appropriately, flip the right side, rotate the middle layers back).

3. If Step 2 ended up using an even number of flips, then the puzzle is solved. Otherwise, perform the following transformation, adapted from Jaap's Page for the domino, that does nothing to the middle two layers (by exchanging an upper and lower middle edge) using an odd number of flips:
D2   R   M-   (D2   R) 3   M   R   D2

Notation: R denotes a flip of the right face, M a 90 degree clockwise rotation of the middle two layers (with respect to looking down from the top), D and D- clockwise and counter clockwise rotations of the lower middle layer (with respect to looking up from the bottom), 2 and 3 mean do it two or three times.
Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube334.htm
(Presents a similar approach with many additional transformations.)

--- 536 ---
Rubik 3x3x5

Designed by Aleh & Eveniy, purchased from Mefferts 2013.
(plastic 3.75" x 2.25" x 2.25";
red across from orange, blue across from green, yellow across from white)

--- 537 ---
Rubik 3x3x5 X

Designed by Aleh, Tont, & Eveniy, purchased from Mefferts 2013.
(plastic 3.75" x 2.25" x 2.25";
red across from orange, blue across from green, yellow across from white)

One of a number of generalizations sold of Rubik 3x3x5. Unlike the standard 3x3x5 shape or the big brother of this puzzle, the Rubik 3x3x5 Cross, the shape of the puzzle can change quickly; below are three successive 90 degree clockwise rotations:


--- 538 ---
Rubik 3x3x5 X

Designed by Aleh, Tont, & Eveniy, purchased from Mefferts 2013.
(plastic 3.75"; red across from orange, blue across from green, yellow across from white)

One of a number of generalizations sold of Rubik 3x3x5. Like the standard 3x3x5 shape and the little brother of this puzzle, Rubik 3x3x5 X, the shape of the puzzle does not change as it is manipulated.

--- 539 ---
Rubik 3x3x9

Made by WitEden, sold by Mefferts 2011.
(plastic, 2.25 inches;
WitEden made a number of variations, many sold by Mefferts,
including smaller heights, white bodies, RoadBlock versions, and Crazy versions)

Here are three successive moves (top, right, middle):


--- 540 ---
Rubik 3x3x9 RoadBlock

Made by WitEden, sold by Mefferts 2011.
(plastic, 2.25 inches;
a generalization of the standard 3x3x9 version; also sold in a white body)

Here are three successive moves (back two, middle slice, back):


--- 541 ---
Rubik 3x4x5

Made by mf8, sold by Mefferts 2012.
(plastic, 2.1" x 2.75" x 3.5", with storage bag 7.4" x 5.75";
white opposite yellow, red opposite orange, green opposite blue)

For all three dimensions, only 180 degree turns are useful.

Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube345.htm

--- 542 ---
Rubik 4x4x4 "Revenge"

"Rubik's Revenge";
Patented by P. Sebesteny 1983.

(plastic, 2.5 inches)

Mefferts "Rubik's Master" 2007;
uses the Eastsheen mechanism,
patented by C. Li 1999.

(plastic, 2.3 inches)

Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube4.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/rr/RubRev1.htm
Helm's Page, from: http://www.helm.lu/cube/solutions/revenge
Hardwick's Page, from: http://www.speedcubing.com/chris/4-movelist3.html
Hardwick's Speed Page, from: http://www.speedcubing.com/chris/4speedsolve.html
Jeays Page, from: http://jeays.net/rr.htm
Rubiks.com booklet, from: http://www.rubiks.com/World/Rubiks%20downloads.aspx
Rubiks.com assembly page, from: http://www.rubiks.com/World/Rubiks%20downloads.aspx
Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubik%27s_Revenge
Sebesteny Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,421,311
Li Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 5,992,850

--- 543 ---
Rubik 4x4x4 Patched

Made in China 2012.
(plastic, 2.75 inches;
blue opposite green, red opposite orange, yellow opposite white)

Here are three consecutive 90 degree turns:


--- 544 ---
Rubik 4x4x4 Brick

Made in China 2012.
(plastic, 2.8 inches;
blue opposite green, red opposite orange, yellow opposite white)

Here are three consecutive 90 degree turns:


--- 545 ---
Rubik 4x4x5

Made in China, 2011.
(plastic 2.3" x 2.3" x 2.9";
blue opposite green, yellow opposite white, red opposite orange)

Turns on the 4x4 planes can be 90 degrees, while turns on the 4x5 planes must be 180 degrees; Jaap's Page presents a solution.


Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube445.htm

--- 546 ---
Rubik 4x4x6

a.k.a. TomZ 4x4x6 Cuboid
Purchased from Mefferts; made by the Now Store, Hong Kong, 2012.
(plastic, 2.5" x 2.5" x 3.5";
orange opposite red, blue opposite green, yellow opposite white)

The shape can change quickly; shown below are three consecutive 90 degree turns. Solution steps are outlined on the Rubik's Ultimate Solution Page.




Further Reading
Jaap's Page,, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube446.htm
Ultimate Page, from: http://rubiksultimatesolution.blogspot.com/2012/04/4x4x6-cuboid.html

--- 547 ---
Rubik 5x5x5 "Professor"

Purchased from Rubik's.com 2006;
patented by U. Krell 1986.

(plastic, 2.75 inches)

Purchased from Mefferts 2007;
uses the Eastsheen mechanism.

(tiled plastic, 2.9 inches)

Mefferts "Mini Professor" 2007;
uses the Eastsheen mechanism.

(plastic, 2.3 inches)

Made by V-Cube 2008;
patent application by P. Verdes 2007.

(plastic, 2.5 inches)

Further reading:
Meffert's Page, from: http://www.mefferts.com/puzzles/profsol.html
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube5.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/rp/RubPro1.htm
Monroe's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/alchemistmatt/cube/5by5cube.html
Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professor's_Cube
Krell Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 4,600,199
Li Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 6,129,356
Verdes Patent Application, from: www.uspto.gov - patent application 2007/0057455

--- 548 ---
Rubik 6x6x6

a.k.a. V-Cube 6x6x6
Patented by P. Verdes 2007, made by V-Cube 2008.
(plastic, 2.75 inches;
opposite black is yellow, opposite red is orange, opposite blue is green)

Uses slightly rectangular cubes on the edges and larger square cubes at the corners; works with a click-stop action. The Wikipedia Page outlines a number of solution strategies, and Jaap's Page presents a four phase solution in the same theme as for the larger Rubik 7x7x7 cube. The Verdes patent describes designs as large as 11x11x11. Below are photos of the this puzzle partially disassembled and the pieces that are used; note that some of these pieces are used for filling space that is not seen from the outside.




Further Reading
Jaap's Page,, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube6.htm
Wikipedia Page,, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V-Cube_6
Verdes Patent Application, from: www.uspto.gov - patent application 2007/0057455
Verdes Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 7,600,756

--- 549 ---
Rubik 7x7x7

a.k.a. V-Cube 7x7x7
Patented by P. Verdes 2007, made by V-Cube 2008.
(plastic, 3.1 inches;
opposite black is yellow, opposite red is orange, opposite blue is green)

This cube has a slightly bulging shape. The V-Cube 7x7x7 on the left is described in the same patent as the V-Cube 6x6x6 (the patent describes designs as large as 11x11x11), and like that cube, it uses slightly rectangular cubes on the edges and larger square cubes at the corners (the 7x7x7 has continuous action, whereas the 6x6x6 has click stop action).

The Wikipedia Page outlines a number of solution strategies. Jaap's Page presents a solution of four phases:
  1. Solve the 5x5 areas of each center one at a time.

  2. "Inner edge pieces" (ones directly adjacent to the center piece on an edge) are matched up to the center edge pieces to form solved triples on each edge.

  3. "Outer edge pieces" (edge pieces that are one away from the center edge piece) are matched up to the solved edge triplets to form solved quintuplets.

  4. Any method for solving Rubik's 3x3x3 cube can now be used to finish the solution (the solved 5x5 centers correspond to the Rubik 3x3x3 centers and the solved quintuplets correspond to the Rubik 3x3x3 edges).


Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube7.htm
Wikipedia Page, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V-Cube_7
Verdes Patent Application, from: www.uspto.gov - patent application 2007/0057455
Verdes Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 7,600,756

--- 550 ---
Large Rubik Cubes


Made in China, 2010 - 2013.
(8x8x8: plastic, 3+1/4", red opposite orange, yellow opposite white, blue opposite green,
9x9x9: plastic, 3+3/4", yellow opposite gray, orange opposite red, blue opposite green,
10x10x10: plastic, 3+7/8", yellow opposite white, red opposite orange, green opposite blue,
11x11x11: plastic, 4+1/2", yellow opposite black, orange opposite red, blue opposite green)

The patent for the Rubik 6x6x6 and Rubik 7x7x7 cubes presented designs for up to 11x11x11 cubes. Subsequently 8x8x8 through 11x11x11 cubes were mass produced in China. The even dimension 8x8x8 and 10x10x10 cubes shown on top above are square in shape but with larger edge and corner tiles, and the odd dimension 9x9x9 and 11x11x11 cubes shown on the bottom above are also slightly curved in shape.

Further Reading
Chris Hardwick's Page On Big Cube Speed Cubing, from:
http://www.speedcubing.com/chris/bigcubes-info.html

--- 551 ---
Huge Rubik Cubes

YongJun MoYu 13 Layer, made in China, 2015.
(plastic, 5+1/4", over 1000 pieces, weighs 5+1/3 pounds)

This cube goes improves the 11x11x11 design with extra tabs on the ends of some pieces. Tony Fisher does an impressive job in a video showing a complete disassembly of the cube, and a second video showing a reassembly; he identifies 38 piece classes.

Even larger Rubik's cubes have been custom made with 3D printing. In February 2011 Oskar Van Deventer presented a Rubik 17x17x17 cube called "Over The Top" (using Shapeways 3D printing technology). In 2016 Coren Puzzle made a 22x22x22 cube and in 2017 Grégoire Pfennig demonstrated this 33x33x33 cube:



Further Reading
Tony Fisher Disassemble,, from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlbsR--UVf8
Tony Fisher Reassemble,, from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xP8AdF8Tl-w
Deventer presentation February 2011, from:
http://twistypuzzles.com/articles/building-17x17x17/building-17x17x17.pdf
Shapeways Page, from: http://www.shapeways.com
Rubik 17x17x17 Video, from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihWyzvOM9pk
Rubik 17x17x17 Disassembly Video, from:
http://www.youtube.com/user/OskarPuzzle?blend=2&ob=1#p/u/2/CBY7JRh2YOo
Ruwix Page about the 22x22x22 cube, from:
https://ruwix.com/the-worlds-largest-cubic-nxnxn-rubiks-cube-puzzle-22x22x22
Ruwix Page about the 33x33x33 cube,, from: https://ruwix.com/33x33x33-rubiks-cube
Greg's 33x33x33 video,, from: https://www.youtube.com/user/RubixFreakGreg

--- 552 ---
Camouflage Cube 3x3x3

Made in China by WitEden, 2012.
(plastic, 2.25" square; white opposite yellow, green opposite blue, red opposite orange)

Looks at first like a Rubik 3x3x3 cube with unequal sections; but turns so as to realign the center planes in a way that causes shape to change quickly; here are three successive 90 degree turns:


--- 553 ---
Camouflage Cube 3x4x4

Made in China by WitEden, 2012.
(plastic, 2.7" x 2.7" x 2.25"; white opposite yellow, green opposite blue, red opposite orange)

A larger version of the Camouflage Cube 3x3x3 where turns realign the center planes in a way that causes shape to change quickly; here are three successive 90 degree turns:


--- 554 ---
Evil Cuboid 2x3x4

Made by Fabio Causarano, 2007.
(plastic, 2 by 3 by 4 inches)

Constructed by combining Rubik's cube mechanisms. In only a few twists the puzzle can become quite jumbled; here is an example of a sequence of four moves:




Referring to the diagram on the right above (which uses the colors gray, orange, and blue to denote the three portions of the puzzle), the center four gray cubes form a solid block to which two essentially separate puzzles are attached; each of the two 2x3 orange sections can be rotated (by temporarily rotating blue out of the way to solve the orange portion independent of the blue, and similarly the blue portion works independent of the orange. The colors are useful to help think about what is going on (although it is not necessarily the case that the colors will be correct whenever the puzzle has the correct shape).

--- 555 ---
Evil Cuboid 3x3x3

Made by Fabio Causarano, 2007.
(plastic, 1.4 inches)

Like the Evil Cuboid 2x3x4, constructed by combining Rubik's cube mechanisms. Here is an example of a sequence of four moves:



--- 556 ---
Evil Cuboid 3x4x5

Made by Fabio Causarano, 2007.
(plastic, 2.2 by 2.9 by 3.7 inches)

Like the Evil Cuboids 2x3x4, constructed by combining Rubik's cube mechanisms. Here is an example of a sequence of four moves:



Here is another example of a sequence of 5 moves:


--- 557 ---
Crazy Cube 2x3x3

Made in China, 2010.
(plastic, 1.6 inches high by 2.2 inches square,
yellow opposite white, blue opposite green, red opposite orange)

A smaller puzzle in the theme of the Crazy Cube 3x3x3. Each side can be flipped 180 degrees as in a standard Rubik 2x3x3. cube. In the solved state shown above with yellow on top, when grasping the bottom and rotating the top, the yellow face rotates about the center circle. After one flip of an edge, holding the bottom and rotating the top turns the entire top face as with a standard Rubik 2x3x3 cube and rotates the circle in the bottom. Each successive flip of an edge reverses the relative movement of top and bottom. That is, one full side is always connected to the center circle of the other. Here are four successive moves of flip right, rotate top 90 degrees clockwise, flip right, rotate top 90 degrees clockwise:



--- 558 ---
Crazy Cube 3x3x3

Crazy Cube Mars, purchased from Mefferts, 2010
(plastic, 2.2 square, white opposite yellow, blue opposite green, orange opposite red;
Crazy Cube 2x3x3 is a smaller puzzle with this theme)

There are two types of faces:
Spin Around: The circle in the center stays fixed and the remainder of the face rotates.
Spin Together: The entire face moves, as in a standard Rubik's Cube.
The Mars member of a series of eight (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) that differ in the configuration of the faces; it has the following face configuration:
white = around, yellow = together
blue = together, green = around
orange = together, red = around
Here is a sequence of three clockwise moves of the left, right, and top faces:


--- 559 ---
Crazy Cube 3x3x7

a.k.a. WitEden Super Magic Cube
Made by WitEden, sold by Mefferts 2011.
(plastic, 2.25" x 2.25" x 1.75"; also sold in a white body)

In the same theme of Rubik's Cube 3x3x3 generalized to the Crazy Cube 3x3x3, this puzzle generalizes the WitEden 3x3 stacks (that were made as large as 3x3x9) to have the added movement. For this one, the circle turns with the top layer, and the bottom layer turns around the circle; a version was also made where both the top and bottom layers turn around the circle.

--- 560 ---
Crazy Cube 4x4x4

Made in China, 2010.
(plastic, 2.6" square, white opposite yellow, blue opposite green, orange opposite red;
Crazy Cube 2x3x3 and Crazy Cube 3x3x3 are smaller versions;
Crazy Cube 4x4x4 Two has a larger center circle)

Faces rotate around the center circle; here is a sequence of three face rotations:



Here is a sequence of 4 rotations about the center:



Jaap's Page presents a solution.

Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/crazy444.htm

--- 561 ---
Crazy Cube 4x4x4 Two

Made in China, 2010.
(plastic, 2.6" square, white opposite yellow, blue opposite green, orange opposite red;
Crazy Cube 2x3x3 and Crazy Cube 3x3x3 are smaller versions;
Crazy Cube 4x4x4 Crazy Cube Two 4x4x4 has a smaller center circle)

Faces rotate around the center circle; here is a sequence of three face rotations:



Jaap's Page presents a solution.

Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/crazy444.htm

--- 562 ---
Geared 1x1x4

Designed and custom made by Oskar Van Deventer, 2012.
(plastic, made on a 3D printer, 2.3" square;
red opposite orange, yellow opposite white, blue opposite green)

The puzzle has 4 layers where the sides are yellow (front), green (left), blue (right) and white (back). Layer 1 (top) is red on top and layer 4 (bottom) is orange on the bottom. In the top layer there is a 35 tooth center gear, three 10 tooth planet gears, and 55 teeth around the edge. In the bottom layer, using finer teeth, is again a 35 tooth center gear (but of a smaller diameter than the top one), three 21 tooth planet gears, and 78 teeth on the outside. The center gears are fixed to a common axle. The axles for the top planet gears are attached to layer 2. The axles for the bottom planet gears are attached to layer 3.

Basically playing with the puzzle involves confusing rotations seeking least common multiples of numbers based on the gears. Here are general properties:

--- 563 ---
Geared 2x2x2

Designed and custom made by Oskar Van Deventer, 2012.
(plastic, made on a 3D printer, 2.3" square;
yellow opposite white, orange opposite red, green opposite blue)

In the theme of the 3x3x3 Gear Cub, fully functional Rubik 2x2x2 with gears. On the left below the top layer has been turned, in the middle the turning of the top has completed to make the puzzle square again, and on the right the front layer has been turned until the puzzle became square again:


--- 564 ---
Geared Mixup

Designed by Oskar van Deventer, purchased from Mefferts, 2014.
(plastic, 2.25" square;
black body: red opposite white, yellow opposite orange, green opposite blue;
white body: red opposite b;ack, yellow opposite orange, green opposite blue)

This geared 2x2 type cube allows 90 degree turns and quickly gets very messy. Starting with the orientation shown above, here is a 90 degree turn of the right side followed by a 90 degree turn of the front:


--- 565 ---
Gear Cube

Invented by Oskar van Deventer, purchased from Mefferts, 2010.
(plastic, 2.3 inches)

Looks like a complicated version of Rubik's Cube, but is actually much easier to solve (see the Gear Cube Extreme for a harder to solve version). Here is the puzzle solved, the right face rotated 90 degrees, and the right face rotated 180 degrees:



Call the operation of rotating a face 180 degrees a flip; it is the only thing you can do: Jaap's Page presents a solution. Here is an approach that requires essentially no memorization:
  1. Restore puzzle to be flat (easy - do flips as needed).

  2. Solve the corners (easy - faces cannot rotate 90 degrees).

  3. Use step A to solve as much as possible, use Step B, and repeat until solved (repositioning the cube as appropriate):

    1. Flip the right face clockwise 6 times.
      (Exchanges front/rear and top/bottom of the vertical center layer).

    2. Flip the bottom face clockwise, flip the right face twice clockwise, flip the bottom face counter clockwise, flip the right face twice counter clockwise.
      (Exchanges front/rear of vertical center layer and left/right centers.)
Further Reading
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/gearcube.htm

--- 566 ---
Gear Cube Extreme

Invented by Oskar van Deventer, purchased from Mefferts, 2011.
(plastic, 2.3 inches)

A harder to solve version of the Gear Cube where the edge pieces along the middle layer are not geared; shipped with stickers to go in the black U's below the gears to make a more difficult puzzle that Mefferts calls the "Gear Cube Extreme". Six turns bring the puzzle back to its shape; below are some example moves. Jaap's Page presents a solution.



Further Reading
Mefferts Page, from: http://www.mefferts.com
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/gearcube2.htm

--- 567 ---
Timur Gear Skewb


Designed by Timur Evbatyrov, purchased from Mefferts, 2015.
Another puzzle in the theme of the Gear Cube.
(plastic, 2.25" square)

--- 568 ---
Gear Shift

Designed by Oskar van Deventer and Bram Cohen, made by Mefferts 2011.
(plastic, 2.25 inches)

As shown on the left below, the puzzle spins around (keep spinning and get back to where you started). As shown in the middle below, the difficulty of this puzzle comes from its ability to be split apart along any of the three axes to allow the orientation of two halves to be changed by spinning only one half, as shown on the right below.


--- 569 ---
Mixup Cube

Designed by Oskar van Deventer, made by Witeden, purchased from Amazon.com 2014.
(plastic, 2+9/16" square)

A Rubik 3x3x3 cube generalized so that the middle section can turned by 45 degrees. The designer says this on the Shapeways Page:
"Mixup Cube is like a Rubik's Cube, but with an unexpected twist. When a mid plane is turned by 45 degrees, other turns are possible. This way of turning mixes up the center and edge pieces. Although the concept has already been patented in 1985 by Sergey Makarov, this version has an internal 2x2x2 "cube" for extra stability."
Here is a 45 degree turn of the middle followed by a 90 degree turn of the front followed by a 90 degree turn of the left side:



Further Reading
Shapeways Page, from: http://www.shapeways.com/model/31732/mixup-cube.html

--- 570 ---
Ghost Cube

Designed by Adam G. Cowan, purchased from Mefferts 2014.
(plastic, 2.2 inches, left silver edition, middle stickered edition,
right stickered version with three turns)

The Meffert's Page says
"The ghost cube is an exercise in making a 3x3x3 shape modification that is as challenging as possible while only allowing one solution. Misaligned layers, odd shaped pieces, and only one color all add to the challenge."
and it quotes the designer:
"When I designed this puzzle back in 2008, I was inspired by Tony Fisher's Golden Cube, itself an iconic puzzle. The Ghost Cube design gradually formed over several days of 'tweaking' a basic concept until I had something really interesting. The very first prototype was printed by Geert Hellings and shown at DCD 2008 with good reviews, and early in 2009, several were made for sale by Jason Smith. After the initial sales, the Ghost Cube concept sat on the back shelf for a while, and to my surprise, several puzzle builders created their own hand made versions (including a 7x7x7 version!). Suddenly there was a strong desire to produce this puzzle, and I set to work on an injection molded production design. I am very happy with the results, and glad that I will be able to share this puzzle with the entire puzzle community! Enjoy!"

--- 571 ---
Pocket Cube

Designed by Justin Eplett, purchased from Mefferts 2013.
(plastic, 2.25" square; smooth mechanism;
left 2 color version, right 4 color version)

The off-axis points of rotation combined with two sizes of cubes, allows for jumbled shapes to be formed; for example, here are three consecutive 90 degree turns:


--- 572 ---
Axel Cube

Designed by Adam G. Cowan, purchased from Mefferts, 2010.
(plastic, 2.2 inches;
yellow opposite white, green opposite blue, orange opposite red)

This puzzle works like a Rubik's 3x3x3 Cube where looking at each face there are three layers that can turn. Here are two views from the top of the two layers turned.



Any move makes a non-square shape, and successive moves make a completely jumbled shape. Here is a sequence of three moves, a clockwise rotation of the back layer, followed by a clockwise rotation of the front layer, followed by a clockwise rotation of the lower right layer:


--- 573 ---
Skewb

a.k.a. Pyraminx Cube
Purchased from Meffert's 2007.
(plastic, 2.2 inches)

Here is a photo of the other three sides:



It can be rotated along any of the planes that passes diagonally through the cube:



Jaap's Page credits this puzzle to Tony Durham, says that it was originally called the Pyraminx Cube by Uwe Meffert, that Douglas Hofstadter coined the name Skewb in a 1982 Scientific American article, discusses the relationship of the Skewb to the Pyraminx, and presents a solution. There are a number of variations of this puzzle, including the Skewb Diamond, Super Skewb Diamond, Skewb Ultimate, Skewb Kite, 3D Skewb, and Skewb Ball

Further Reading
Meffert's Page, from: http://www.mefferts.com/puzzles/skewbsol.html
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/skewb.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/Skewb.htm
Dry Erase Board Page, from: http://www.thedryeraseboard.com/mechpuz/skewb/solution
A Cubist Page, from: http://www.acubist.com

--- 574 ---
Augmented Skewbs

Augmented Faces Skewb
a.k.a. Polymorphix Limited Edition
Purchased from Meffert's 2008.
(plastic, 2.9 inches)

Same as the Skewb where each face has a protruding piece on it. The colors of each of the four faces of a protrusion must match the color of the corresponding adjacent face, which gives an explicit constraint to the orientation of a face with respect to its corners.



Augmented Corners Skewb
a.k.a. 3D Skewb
Purchased from Meffert's 2008.
(plastic, 2.9 inches)

Same as the Skewb where each corner has been replaced with a protruding piece (that has the same three colors that match the adjacent faces).

--- 575 ---
Holey Skewb

a.k.a. Void Skewb
Designed by Tony Fisher, purchased from Mefferts 2010.
(plastic, 2.2 inches)

In the theme of the Rubik 3x3x3 Void Cube, same as the Skewb but without the centers, so that one can look through the center of the cube along any of the three axes (i.e., a square bar can be passed through the cube in any of the three directions).

--- 576 ---
Golden Cube

Designed by Tony Fisher, purchased from Meffert's, 2009.
(plastic with metallic finish, 3.1 inches;
made in a number of colors in addition to gold,
including silver shown above, copper, white, black)

A Skewb mechanism with sections offset; makes a big mess when it is mixed up. In the same spirit as the Rubik 3x3x3 Mirror Block pieces of the cube are distinguished by shape rather than color.

--- 577 ---
Dino Cube

a.k.a. Dinosaur Cube
Described in patent of J. Holloway 2000, first manufactured in the mid 1990's,
left: custom made from a Rainbow Cube mechanism by D. Calvo 2007,
middle two: sold by SMAZ 2011,
right: sold by Mefferts 2011.

(all are plastic, left 2.3 inches, others 2.2 inches,
left three: yellow opposite orange, pink opposite red, blue opposite white
right: yellow opposite white, blue opposite green, red opposite orange)

Each corner can twist. Below are photos of the other three sides and of the puzzle mixed up:



Next to the Pyraminx Duo, the Dino Cube is one of the most easy (but fun) Rubik's type puzzles. Hold the cube with one corner facing up and determine what colors must go on what faces. Start by solving just this upward facing corner. Then do the three adjacent corners to it. Finally, the corner facing down may just need to be rotated. Three-deep reasoning can be used, like "to rotate this triangle into place, I need to first rotate this corner so it doesn't get messed up (and then rotate it back afterwards), and before doing that I should rotate this other corner so it doesn't get messed up (and rotate it back afterwards)". This reasoning works because you don't care what happens to the bottom corner until the end, when it will end up solved except for rotating it.

Further reading:
Jaap's Page, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/dinocube.htm
Holloway Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 6,056,290

--- 578 ---
Blue Magic

a.k.a. Black Flower Cube, Star Cube, Rex Cube
Made in China, 2010.
(plastic, 2.2 inches;
white body: yellow opposite black, blue opposite green, red opposite orange;
block body: yellow opposite white, blue opposite green, red opposite orange)

Generalized Dino Cube, with two paths across each diagonal; here are 3 successive moves:


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Mosaic Cube

Designed by Oskar Van Deventer, sold by Mefferts 2011.
(plastic, 2.4 inches;
yellow opposite orange, blue opposite green, red opposite purple)

In the theme of the Dino Cube, but much more complex; corners rotate in two different layers:



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Square 1

a.k.a. Super Cubix, Cube 21
Patented by K. Hrsel and V. Kopsky 1993, copyright Irwin Toys 1990.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

Three layers that form a cube when solved. The middle layer has two identical trapezoid pieces that can be in only one of two states, square or nonsquare. The top and bottom each have four 60 degree corner pieces and four 30 degree edge pieces. The only moves are to rotate the top or bottom layers by a multiple of 30 degrees and to make a vertical 180 degree twist along the reference plane that passes through the two middle pieces. The middle can be solved independent of top and bottom. Repeating three times a twist followed by a 180 degree rotation of the top changes the state of the middle (if you don't care about disturbing the top and bottom, a single 30 degree rotation followed by a twist suffices). A twist followed by 180 rotations of the top and bottom, followed by a twist flips the middle upside-down. And we can rotate the top and / or bottom after a sequence of moves to align them with the middle. Hence, we address solving the top and bottom, without worrying about the middle.

The easier problem of getting the puzzle back to a cube shape, but with colors in any arrangement (as in the second figure above) requires no explicit memorization. Gather the 8 edges in the top to form the "flower" pattern; the figure below shows the flower on the left and patterns resulting from 4 twists. The bottom layer below the flower has all 8 corners arranged in a star, however, the four positions resulting from each of the twists all have identical patters on the top and bottom. So the rule for this sequence is "rotate along the major axis of symmetry 4 times" (shown by the dark lines). The only exception is when a twist gives you the same pattern back; in this case, rotate the bottom by 90 degrees before performing the twist (step 3).


Making the flower is not hard. Pairing edges and then combining pairs is the general approach, but you typically cannot avoid having two "stragglers" that are not paired. The key is to get a pair of stragglers separated by exactly two corner pieces; then you can park them in the bottom left, use rotations of the top and twists to get the other 6 edge pieces together, and then twist up the stragglers to become the first and last of the 8. If you get stuck with two stragglers separated by only one corner piece, split a group and rearrange, sooner or later things will work.

--- 581 ---
Solving Square 1
We combine approaches of Jaap, Vandenbergh, and Nerd Paradise for a solution of more moves, but requires only 3 non-trivial sequences to be memorized.

Holding the puzzle: Hold in your left hand with Square 1 on the left, your thumb on the short orange section of the front of the middle layer and your finger on the long red section of the back of the middle layer. All twists are relative to the reference plane that goes from the front left to the back right.

Notation: Pieces are denoted by direction U (up), D (down), L (left), R (right), F (front), B (back); UFL corner, BR edge, etc. For moves, / denotes a twist and (x,y) means rotate the top x units and the bottom y units; a positive number is clockwise and a negative number is counterclockwise. For example:
change state of middle layer: (6,0) / (6,0) / (6,0) /
flip the middle layer: / (6,6) /
Step 1: Make the puzzle into a cube, as described on the previous page.

Step 2: Get all the white corners to the top and all the green corners to the bottom (but not necessarily in their correct locations). If you are at the level that you can make it into a cube, you can easily do this. Get two green together and park them in the lower left. The using rotations of the top and twists get the other two greens together and twist them down.

Step 3: Get all the white edges to the top and all the green edges to the bottom (but not necessarily in their correct locations), using the transformation UB <-> DF:
(0,-1) / (-3,0) / (4,1) / (-4,-1) / (3,0) /

A note on using the puzzle upsidedown: The moves in Steps 4 and 5 are defined for the top layer. To apply them to the bottom layer, turn the puzzle upsidedown, hold the puzzle with Square 1 on the left (your thumb on the long red section on the front and your finger on the short orange section on the back) and precede a move sequence with (-1,1), which restores the reference plane to effectively go from front left to back right.

Step 4: Position corners using the transformation UFL <-> UFR:
/ (3,-3) / (3,0) / (-3,0) / (0,3) / (-3,0) /
* Three times to swap diagonally, or do directly using UBL<->UFR:
/ (3,3) / (3,0) / (3,3) / (3,0) / (3,3) /
Step 5: Position edges using the transformation UF <-> UR:
/ (-3,0) / (0,3) / (0,-3) / (0,3) / (2,0) / (0,2) / (-2,0) / (4,0) / (0,-2) / (0,2) / (-1,4) / (0,-3) /
* Three times to swap opposites, or do directly using UL<->UR:
/ (3,3) / (-1,0) / (2,-4) / (4,-2) / (0,-2) / (-4,2) / (1,-5) / (3,0) / (3,3) /
Step 6: Fix the middle layer if necessary.

--- 582 ---
Some Photos of Square 1 Mixed Up

Other Useful Sequences (that can be used for shortcuts)
Exchange the top and bottom layers:
/ (6,6) / (5,-5)
Exchange the UF and UB edges with DF and DB (Nerd Paradise "Sequence A"):
(1,0) / (-1,-1) / (0,1)
Exchange the 4 top edges with the 4 bottom edges:
(1,0) / (-1,-1) / (-2,-2) / (-1,-1) / (0,1)
Exchange two pairs of corners (from Jaap's page):
UFR<->UBL, DFR<->DBR: / (3,0) / (-3,0) / (3,0) / (3,0) / (6,0) /
UFR<->UBR, DFL<->DBR: / (0,-3) / (0,3) / (0,-3) / (0,-3) / (0,6) /
Exchange two pairs of edges (from Jaap's page):
UF<->UB, DF<->DB: (1,0) / (-1,-1) / (6,0) / (1,1) / (-1,0)
UL<->UF, DR<->DF: (1,0) / (-3,0) / (-1,-1) / (3,0) / (1,1) / (-3,0) / (-1,-1) / (4,1) / (-1,0)
Exchange two edge corner pairs (Nerd Paradise "Sequence B"):
DL<->DR, DLB<->DRB: / (3,0) / (-3,-3) / (0,3) /

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Square 1 Package:


--- 584 ---
Unpacking Square 1:
Square 1 is shipped mixed up in a way that looks intimidating but can be solved with 7 twists that are provided in the directions:





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Other Versions of Square 1

Sold in U.K, circa 1990.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

Sold in Hungary, circa 1990.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

3 yellow sides with silver on opposite sides.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

Custom made - all sides gold.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

All black, purchased from Cubfans 2007.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

All clear, purchased from Cubfans 2007.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

Made in China, purchased 2005.
(plastic, 2.1 inches)

--- 586 ---
Square 1 Variants

Left: Purchased from Mefferts 2012.
Right: "Dodecagonal Barrel", custom made by Laurent Langlade 2007.

(plastic, made with Square 1 parts; 2.2 inches;
top and bottom layer can each rotate by multiples of 30 degrees
and a vertical 180 twist can be made along a single reference plane)


"Super Square 1", by Smaz Smart Toy Shop IQ Toys, Hong Kong, 2008-2009.
(plastic, 2.2 inches high;
extra center layer where everything rotates around a center post that splits;
switching top and bottom layers will not change color of the top of the posts.)


"Two-Layer Square 1, made in China 2011. (plastic, 2.2" x 2.2" x 1.1", a Super Square 1 without the middle layers)

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Further Reading
Jaap's Page - Square 1, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/square1.htm
Jaap's Page - Square 2, from: http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/square2.htm
McFarren's Page, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/sq1/sq1xf.htm
McFarren's Page2, from: http://www.geocities.com/abcmcfarren/math/sq1/sq1xf.htm
Alchemistmatt Page Page, from: http://www.alchemistmatt.com/cube/square1.html
Dry Erase Board Page, from: http://www.thedryeraseboard.com/mechpuz/square1/solution
Nerd Paradise Page, from: http://nerdparadise.com/puzzles/square1
Vandenbergh's Page, from: http://www.cubezone.be/square1.html
Monroe's Page, from: http://www.alchemistmatt.com/cube/square1.html
Eggermont's Page, from: http://web.inter.nl.net/users/C.Eggermont/Puzzels/SquareOne
Eggermont's List of all Square 1 configurations,
from: http://web.inter.nl.net/users/C.Eggermont/Puzzels/SquareOne/SquareList.html
F2 Page, from: http://f2.org/maths/square1
Hrsel and Kopsky Patent, from: www.uspto.gov - patent no. 5,193,809

--- 588 ---
Helicopter Cube

Designed by A. Cowan 2005, purchased from Mefferts, 2010.
(plastic, 2+3/8 inches;
black body: red opposite white, yellow opposite orange, blue opposite green
white body: red opposite black, yellow opposite orange, blue opposite green)

Each of the 12 edges can rotate 180 degrees; here is a sequence of three moves:



In addition, an edge may be partially rotated so that subsequent moves create a jumbled shape; here is the same sequence of three moves as shown above except the first is a partial rotation:


--- 589 ---
Curvy Copter

Designed by Tom van der Zanden, purchased from Mefferts, 2012.
(plastic, 2+3/8 inches;
red opposite orange, yellow opposite white, blue opposite green)

A curvy version of the Helicopter Cube: